Gawker Upgrades Its Kinja Commenting System

first_imgKinja originally launched in December of 2012.  “To paraphrase Nick [Denton, founder and CEO of Gawker Media], it was developed to solve the tragedy of comments that can be a toxic and poisonous section of a news site or blog,” says Lauren Bertolini, community development manager It is difficult to argue that Internet trolls have become an endemic problem for publishers looking to create quality conversations that engage serious readers. And while Bertolini doesn’t believe there is a way to rid the Web of trolls, she does believe there are better ways to control the conversations of Gawker’s approximately 20 million monthly site visitors. “If you give people the tools to engage and promote a discussion then hopefully they will utilize it,” Bertolini says.  Social Media is in Kinja’s DNA, but its built around news content, thus making it a unique product. Registered users can create a homepage where they can post blogs, share content from users and editors and store comments posted on any of the Gawker Media sites. Users can also follow writers, other users and integrate social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter into their homepage. Editors from each vertical will have the same tools available and are expected to be active members of the community. This incentivizes both the reader and the writer to participate in a manner that keeps the conversation moving forward. “The revamped commenting system debuting today will refine and sharpen that heckling, and make it more likely, we hope, that informed sources and subjects will bring their voices to bear on our stories, unmediated and of their own volition,” explains Gawker editor-in-chief John Cook in a post about the new platform. “It banishes untrusted or new sources to the outer reaches in a ‘pending queue,’ while privileging and highlighting threads started by readers that have been found useful in the past.”Bertonlini adds that while Gawker is primarily a news-producing operation, the ability for readers to contribute to the content by having a conversation around it is important. “We produce news and that’s what our foundation is. We understand the tools that you need to create content and we wanted a platform that was simple and easy to use that can build a rich story and conversation. We are giving people control of the conversation,” she says.Social blogging is not a new concept, but Kinja is unique in that it merges professional and amateur content into one space. This of course raises provocative questions about crowdsourcing content: How could this impact professional journalists? Will readers ultimately take control of content? Bertolini says that is not a concern for the company: “Our content is still edited by John Cook or our other editors and they will always decide what gets posted. The editors are still in control. But we have hired people out of comments.” Gawker Media rolled out its redesigned platform this week across all of its verticals, which include Gawker, Jezebel, Deadspin and a just re-introduced, Silicon Valley-focused Valleywag. Along with all this is a significant upgrade to Gawker’s homegrown commenting platform Kinja, which has been tweaked to surface more constructive content and “banish” pointless or excessively harsh commenters. last_img read more

BMWs nextgen adaptive cruise control stops at traffic lights

first_img The 2019 BMW 330i is a brilliant return to form for the… BMW Enlarge ImageThis 330i prototype houses BMW’s next-generation adaptive cruise control tech. Steven Ewing/Roadshow BMW is working on a next-generation adaptive cruise control system that adapts the technology for use in city environments. The company detailed and demonstrated this technology at an event Tuesday, and plans to roll it out in the near future.Called Urban Traffic Light Recognition, at least internally, this next step forward for adaptive cruise control will allow a car to slow and stop at a traffic light without the driver touching the brake pedal. BMW’s engineers say this tech will be able to work at stop signs, as well, though this was not demonstrated.On a short test route around Munich, Germany, a BMW test driver set the adaptive cruise control at 30 kilometers per hour — the speed limit — and approached a traffic light. As the light changed from green to yellow, the car’s cameras picked up the signal, and displayed a traffic light image on the digital gauge cluster of the BMW 330i test car. The car then slowed for the light without the driver needing to do anything. Share your voice Tags 6:56 BMW 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2 Now playing: Watch this:center_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Now, here’s the caveat: If you are the lead car at the stoplight, the system will not automatically restart once the light turns green. You either have to move the car forward with the gas pedal, or press the “resume” button on the steering wheel. If you aren’t the lead car, the system works like any other adaptive cruise control, where it restarts after a lead car begins to pull away.BMW says this technology is only programmed to work at speeds up to 80 kilometers per hour (50 miles per hour) right now, and is still very much in development. When it rolls out, vehicles fitted with the latest radar systems — like the 3 Series or X7, for example — should be able to add the tech via over-the-air updates. BMW hopes to roll this tech out across several countries, though it’s unclear if this technology will be legally approved for use in the US. 2020 Mercedes-Benz CLA250 first drive: Now actually feels like a premium car More From Roadshow 57 Photos Comments Auto Tech The 2019 BMW 330i is once again a joy to drivelast_img read more

Sensex spurts on Economic Surveys optimistic projection for FY17

first_imgIndian stock markets, which had trimmed the morning session gains during the afternoon trade on Friday, were up almost one percent after the government tabled the Economic Survey 2015-2016, projecting a GDP growth rate for 2016-2017 in the range of 7 to 7.75 percent. The S&P BSE Sensex was trading at 23,203, with a gain of 226 points, or 0.99 percent, at around 1.45 p.m.The biggest Sensex gainer was India’s largest lender State Bank of India, which was trading at Rs 155, up 4.11 percent; state-owned miner Coal India, Larsen & Toubro, NTPC, BHEL and Axis Bank were also trading with a gain of 2 to 3.40 percent.On the NSE, the 50-scrip Nifty was trading with a similar gain of about one percent at 7,040, after slipping below the psychological mark of 7,000 during the afternoon trade. Most of the sectoral indices were up, except for auto. The rupee, which opened lower at 68.73 and plunged to 68.79 to the US dollar, recovered and was trading at about 68.71, though not far away from its all-time low of 68.85 hit in August 2013.”The intra-day range is seen between 68.60-68.85 levels,” IFA Global said in its note on Friday.The yield on the Indian 10-year benchmark 7.72% maturing 2025 had risen to to 8.07% on account of system-wide liquidity shortfall, but eased later after the survey was tabled in Parliament.On Friday, the government’s Economic Survey 2015-2016 forecast the economy to grow between 7 and 7.75 percent in FY2017, almost flat from the advance estimate of 7.6 percent for the current year released last month.last_img read more