Raspberry Pi 400 personal microcomputer fits into a compact keyboard » Gadget Flow

first_img– Advertisement – The Raspberry Pi 400 hides a whole PC into a compact keyboard and is great for remote workers and children. This gadget is an upgrade of the original Raspberry Pi and features a quad-core 64-bit processor. Therefore, it runs much quicker and remains cooler than its predecessor. The Raspberry Pi 400 is packed with 4GB of RAM and features a MicroSD card slot for storage and running the operating system. There’s also plenty of USB ports to connect to a monitor and other devices. Furthermore, it features wireless networking and Bluetooth, so you can remain connected on the go. This personal microcomputer also offers 4K video playback. Although it’s compact design is a highlight, the gadget still features full-size keys. Overall, this affordable device mirrors the minimalism of earlier devices with a modern touch that’s simple to use.last_img read more

CDC says delay of Chiron flu vaccine not a problem

first_imgAug 27, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Close to half of the nation’s influenza vaccine doses will be shipped later than expected this fall, but everyone who wants a flu shot should ultimately be able to get it, federal health officials said today.Chiron Corp. announced yesterday that it is delaying release of its flu vaccine doses until early October because some lots of vaccine didn’t meet sterility standards. The company said it expects to ship 46 million to 48 million doses, down from the 50 million doses predicted previously.But Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said today the CDC still expects that about 100 million doses of vaccine, more than ever before, will be available this year.”Those who are used to receiving their shot in early October may not get it then,” Gerberding said. But, “The bottom line is that right now we’re expecting to have enough flu vaccine so that everybody who needs flu vaccine can have it. . . . For folks who are trying to plan for their immunization, the best thing is to stay tuned to messages from your local health officers and your clinician.”The other flu vaccine manufacturers are expected to deliver their product on schedule, Gerberding reported. Chiron and Aventis Pasteur are each expected to produce roughly half of the projected 100 million doses, while MedImmune is likely to supply about 1.5 million doses of the intranasal vaccine FluMist, she said.Chiron anticipates shipping 40 million doses in October, and MedImmune also will deliver its doses in October, according to Gerberding. After shipping a few doses this month, Aventis anticipates delivering 15 million to 20 million doses in September and the rest in October, she said.”We’re confident that we’ll be able to get vaccination programs started on time with the doses that we do have,” Gerberding commented.Neither Chiron nor Gerberding revealed exactly what caused the problem with the Chiron vaccine, produced in Liverpool, England. The company announcement said “a small number of lots” failed to meet sterility specifications. “While ongoing internal investigations into the root cause of the variance indicate no widespread issues with the manufacturing process, Chiron has delayed releasing any Fluvirin doses until it has completed additional release tests,” the announcement said.Gerberding said Chiron officials told her they “have identified the problem, they’re fixing it, and they’re taking extra steps to make sure they have a safe product before they ship it.”Chiron said its planned “late-season delivery” of 2 million Fluvirin doses for the CDC stockpile for the Vaccines for Children program remains on schedule. Those doses are in addition to the 46 million to 48 million produced for general distribution.Gerberding said the vaccine lots affected by the sterility problem don’t include any pediatric vaccine. “We’re not expecting a decrease in total predicted doses available for children at this time,” she said.In response to a question, she said Chiron’s vaccine production problems, to her knowledge, were not related to thimerosal, a mercury compound used as a preservative in most flu vaccine doses. The CDC predicted in May that 6 million to 8 million doses of thimerosal-free flu vaccine would be produced this year for people concerned about the preservative.Gerberding said flu vaccine delays are nothing new. “As recently as 2001 we had some shipments that were delayed until October. . . . We’ve been here before, we’ve done this before, and we’ve handled it.”The CDC, she noted, recommends flu vaccination for people aged 50 and older, those who have a chronic medical condition or weakened immunity, those who expect to be pregnant during the flu season, children aged 6 to 23 months, healthcare workers, and people in close contact with others in the foregoing categories.last_img read more

CDC’s Cox honored as top federal employee

first_imgSep 28, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Influenza expert Nancy Cox, PhD, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was named federal employee of the year yesterday by a nonprofit group.Cox, 58, director of the CDC’s Influenza Division, received the award in Washington, DC, from the Partnership for Public Service, a nongovernmental organization that promotes excellence in government employees. She was honored for her work to help the United States and the world prepare for an influenza pandemic, according to a CDC news release yesterday.”Nancy Cox embodies the best of what CDC is about—world-class scientists serving on the front lines each and every day to protect America’s health,” said CDC Director Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, in the CDC release. “Her dedication and leadership of CDC’s influenza activities are truly making a difference in the country’s fight against seasonal influenza as well as in the world’s preparation for the next influenza pandemic.””I’m very honored to receive this award,” Cox said in the CDC release. “I feel like it’s a reflection of the excellent work done by many, many people who’ve worked on influenza at CDC—both in the past and present—and have helped build our influenza program into what it is today.”An Iowa native, Cox received a bachelor’s degree in bacteriology from Iowa State University and a doctorate in virology from the University of Cambridge, England. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, before joining the CDC in 1975.Cox assumed leadership of the CDC’s 14-person influenza group in 1992. The division now comprises more than 100 staff members.Under Cox’s direction, the Influenza Division monitors for new influenza strains or outbreaks that could signal a pandemic, assists countries around the globe in investigating flu outbreaks, recommends strains for the seasonal flu vaccine, and conducts a variety of influenza virus studies, according to the CDC news release.Cox has received numerous scientific and achievement awards, the CDC said. In addition, she was recognized by Time magazine as one of 2006’s 100 most influential people and by Newsweek as one of the “15 People Who Make America Great.”See also:Sep 27 CDC news releasehttp://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/r060928.htmlast_img read more

The Association of Landlords from Cres is organizing the first public forum on the amount of the flat tax

first_imgThe deadline within which cities and municipalities must make a decision on the amount of the lump sum is January 31, 2019. RELATED NEWS: Also, the question arises as to what over 100.000 renters do in their local communities with the organization of the same public forums and the opening of a dialogue with the City Council (representatives of the local population) who make the decision on the amount of the lump sum. This directly affects and affects the business of private renters, and if there is now no dialogue and the need to openly discuss the amount of the lump sum, then the problem is in the renters themselves. When the decision is made on the amount of the lump sum per bed, then it is too late to “Facebook smart” and call for the “destruction” of private accommodation. It is primarily the responsibility of private landlords to be actively involved in the discussion and open a dialogue with City representatives. Today, starting at 18:30 pm in the Rector’s Palace on Cres, the first public forum will be held on the amount of the lump sum per bed, ie accommodation unit. WITH THE ENTRY IN THE NEW YEAR, THE RESIDENCE TAX WAS INCREASED The law stipulates that the lump sum may not be less than HRK 150 or more than HRK 1.500. However, if the city or municipality does not make a decision on the amount of the flat tax within the given deadline, then according to the Act, the lump sum will be 750 kuna per bed. RENTERS HAVE THE MOST BENEFITS FROM TOURISM? center_img Currently, the amount of the lump sum in the area of ​​Cres is 300,00 kn, and as they point out from the Cres Landlords Association, the association’s leadership wants to hear the landlord’s opinion before opening an official dialogue with the City. More information about the public forum – Flat tax on the island of Cres, see HERE It is interesting that this is the first public forum on this topic, at least as far as I know. Also, this is the only right way to develop the local community through dialogue and constructive discussion, so support the organizers and come to the public discussion. Cover photo: TZ Cres PRIVATE RENTERS ON STRIKE: WHO PROFITS AND WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES?last_img read more

Only the rich want the GOP’s tax plan

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThere’s much excitement over new tax bill, which is a reincarnation of Reaganomics. George H.W. Bush called Reaganomics “voodoo economics.” No one wants it except the upper 1 percent, who get to control more and more of the nation’s wealth. Conservatives, I think, support the efforts primarily because liberals are against it. When conservatives and liberals listen to one another, they find they don’t really have much different views. The turmoil Americans are kept in really pleases the ruling class.Calvin MooreColonieMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

Big corporations get off easy on crimes

first_imgWho pays the fine? Not  Michael Corbat, the executive who was paid $14,515,462 in 2016. Jail was never a possibility.HSBC had criminal charges dropped for money laundering. It also had made a profit of $881 million for allowing illegal drugs to flow through the American financial system. One of the world’s biggest lenders was fined and paid $1.9 billion, but again, jail is never an option in our justice system.Why does Congress let these crimes go unpunished? The people have an obligation to demand equal justice. As Benjamin Franklin said, “If the people behave like sheep they will be eaten by wolves.”Mary Jane ValachovicSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Motorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departments Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionIn the Capital Region, a 16-year-old boy was sentenced to nine years in jail for stealing about $100 worth of clothes. Compare that to the sentence and jail time time received by the oligarchs of the world — whose corporations and banks cheat the innocent public of millions but have too much money and power to ever see a jail cell.Citigroup was fined $11.5 million for cheating mom-and-pop investors by giving them wrong information on 1,800 stocks the company analyzed.last_img read more

Guns not only lethal in hands of criminals

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionThis is in response to the Feb. 14 letter arguing that it is criminals, not guns, who are responsible for gun deaths:Strong political opinions are rarely altered by arguments. What does change people’s minds is personal experience. Mr. Homan, it would only take one unsupervised child getting a hold of your gun and accidentally shooting another child to change your mind. It would only take one depressed neighbor knowing you had a gun and subsequently borrowing it to kill herself to change your life.As a retired mental health worker, I know many such cases, and none of the people involved were criminals.Nancy OrtnerScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…last_img read more

Chesterfield sale in balance

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Funds get a new lease of life

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Town centre regeneration

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img