Big corporations get off easy on crimes

first_imgWho pays the fine? Not  Michael Corbat, the executive who was paid $14,515,462 in 2016. Jail was never a possibility.HSBC had criminal charges dropped for money laundering. It also had made a profit of $881 million for allowing illegal drugs to flow through the American financial system. One of the world’s biggest lenders was fined and paid $1.9 billion, but again, jail is never an option in our justice system.Why does Congress let these crimes go unpunished? The people have an obligation to demand equal justice. As Benjamin Franklin said, “If the people behave like sheep they will be eaten by wolves.”Mary Jane ValachovicSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Motorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departments Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionIn the Capital Region, a 16-year-old boy was sentenced to nine years in jail for stealing about $100 worth of clothes. Compare that to the sentence and jail time time received by the oligarchs of the world — whose corporations and banks cheat the innocent public of millions but have too much money and power to ever see a jail cell.Citigroup was fined $11.5 million for cheating mom-and-pop investors by giving them wrong information on 1,800 stocks the company analyzed.last_img read more

Hackney cuts debts by £6m as financial year-end nears

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Interview: Mats Langensjö weighs options for Sweden’s giant AP7

first_img“The big balancing act is between the implied or expected cautiousness of pillar one and how you maximise pensions”Mats Langensjö“Having this kind of structure in the first pillar system is rare, as there are not many such systems that rely on market returns – in fact, I haven’t come across any others where this is the case,” he said.“So the question is, how do you then position that? It is a given that the structure is there, but what is the appropriate level of risk and appropriate objective, particularly for the savers?”Other issues that needed to be resolved in the report included defining the target group for the default fund.“In one sense you are targeting the whole population of Sweden, but maybe you need to prioritise certain groups such as people who are younger, older, or have different earnings levels,” he said.New investment guidelines?Langensjö said he would also consider whether AP7’s investment universe should be updated, as a consequence of the objectives and risk profile.AP7 currently invests more than 80% of its portfolio in equities, but its leadership has called on the Swedish government to broaden investment rules to allow real estate and infrastructure allocations.In his report, Langensjö said he would also address AP7’s use of leverage.He cited Nobel Prize-winning economist Richard Thaler, who last year stated that AP7 should not apply leverage to its investments, but Langensjö said there were good arguments for and against the use of gearing.Langensjö refused to be drawn on the specifics of how the investment universe might be altered.“It is too early in the process to say, but the big balancing act is between the implied or expected cautiousness of pillar one – the social security approach – and how you maximise pensions, which in simplistic terms is to maximise risk,” he said. “In the end that will define the investment universe and the type of portfolio.”Further readingSweden cuts one third of investment options in system overhaul Pensions regulator outlines plans to cull a third of the investment funds from the PPM, transferring roughly SEK9bn (€879m) to AP7Swedish Premium Pension: Safe and sound Reform of the Premium Pension System aims to root out poor management practices and make the system sustainable, writes Gail Moss “It was set up at a time when there were no other investment options in the first pillar system, then later it became the default option and now it is a fund in excess of €50bn because more than two thirds of savers have chosen to stay in it.”AP7 was the most rapidly growing investment fund in the world, he said, which meant the framework had now to be changed. According to data from IPE’s Top 1000 Pension Funds survey, it has grown from €8bn in 2009 to almost €62bn as of last year, as a result of investment returns and policy reforms.AP7’s growthChart MakerLangensjö’s report is likely to be submitted by the summer and will probably be put out for consultation later this year as part of the second stage of the PPM reform that is currently under way.Just over 13% of Swedish individuals’ state pension contributions – equating to 2.5% of salary – are directed into the PPM, which allows people to put their money into a wide range of private investment funds or into the default option, the balanced Såfa fund run by AP7.In compiling his report, Langensjö said he would look at what the future role and objective for AP7 should be as the default fund. The Swedish Finance Ministry has tasked pensions expert Mats Langensjö with devising a new framework for the country’s largest public sector pension fund.AP7 is the manager of the default option within the defined contribution (DC) segment of the state pension, known as the Premium Pension System (PPM).Langensjö – who has played significant roles in several pension reform processes in Sweden – is considering all options for the fund, including expanding its investment universe as well as changing its use of leverage.He told IPE: “AP7 has been around since 2000, but nothing has really changed since then in terms of the framework.last_img read more

Photo Gallery: Memorial Day, 2018

first_imgPhotos by Jay Cook and Patrick Olivero |On Memorial Day, May 28, patriotism was on display in the towns of Rumson, Fair Haven and Middletown. Americans paid their respects to those who died in service to their country and held festive  parades.Some of these photos were published in the May 31-June 7, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img