10 months agoChelsea defender David Luiz: We must find consistency

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea defender David Luiz: We must find consistencyby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea defender David Luiz says finding a winning consistency is key to returning to the top.Luiz knows Chelsea need consistency, after their win over Manchester City was sandwiched between defeats against Wolves and Leicester.He said: “In those games we had the same problem after the goal we conceded. We changed our style. We have to be consistent in the way we play, and after that the results are going to come.”Luiz praised Eden Hazard, who has been playing as a false nine recently. “He’s a fantastic player, an intelligent player,” he said. “He is playing a different position but intelligent players can play anywhere. He is doing well and he deserves it.” last_img read more

DeVier Posey to Verlon Reed Heres how to receive with ease

The Buckeye quarterback battle has dominated talk at the water cooler, but the biggest concern heading into spring might have been the lack of depth at wide receiver. With DeVier Posey suspended for the first five games of the season and the graduation of Dane Sanzenbacher, the Buckeyes lost virtually all meaningful experience at the position. The Buckeyes have a collection of young players who hope to fill the void, but their performances in the early parts of the spring were far from encouraging. “We got young guys at receiver and I thought they really came along this spring,” coach Jim Tressel said after the Spring Game on Saturday. “I think after about three practices we were thinking, ‘Oh my gosh, we might be in three (tight ends), a fullback and a tailback.’” But Posey took it upon himself to bring the younger guys along. “I think for me the biggest thing to get those guys to understand as far as leading by example is practicing hard every single day,” Posey said. “I want them to see how passionate I play, how the game is supposed to be played and how fast the game is supposed to be played so that they can learn from that.” Posey said the receivers needed some help getting accustomed to college football and the rigors of being a student-athlete. “They had some rough days,” Posey said. “They had some days they didn’t want to play football anymore, and they had some days where they looked like All-Americans and I felt like that was key to get those guys on a straight line and keep them consistent.” Posey’s example seemed to make a big difference. During the first two jersey scrimmages, Posey was the only receiver to reach the end zone, but Saturday’s Spring Game saw four new receivers cross the goal line. At 6-foot-5, 228 pounds, redshirt freshman T.Y. Williams is an imposing physical target. He’s had issues catching the ball in his brief time at Ohio State, but he led the team in receiving yards Saturday with three receptions for 83 yards, including a 68-yard touchdown catch from quarterback Taylor Graham. Sophomore Corey “Philly” Brown is the only receiver with legitimate game experience. Brown had eight receptions for 105 yards and a touchdown last year and is the leading candidate to replace Posey as the top wide receiver. He hauled in a 15-yard touchdown pass from Braxton Miller on Saturday. Tressel seemed prophetic after calling redshirt freshman Verlon Reed the “dark horse” before the Spring Game. Reed caught Saturday’s first touchdown pass, a 17-yard strike from Kenny Guiton. A quarterback in high school, Reed has caught the attention of his teammates with his play. “I think he’s stepped up,” offensive lineman Mike Brewster said. “I think he’s started to make a name for himself on the team.” Ryan Ross also caught a touchdown from Joe Bauserman. “I felt like a proud dad today watching three of them score touchdowns and making big plays,” Posey said. “To me, that shows their growth and that shows their maturity.” Posey said the success for the young receivers in the spring game will help their progression through the summer and fall camps. “It’s definitely a confidence booster,” Posey said of the receivers’ touchdowns. “I think that was Corey’s second time scoring at Ohio Stadium and it was Tyrone and Verlon’s first time. They’re happy, man, and I’m really excited for those guys.” But the young group still has a ways to go. Most of the receivers’ success came when the first-team defense watched from the sidelines. “(The receivers) need to have tremendous progress between now and September,” Tressel said. “But I think for all of our guys, receivers especially, with the youth of them, this spring was well-served.” Recruits Devin Smith and Evan Spencer will both join the receiver battle this summer and hope to help the offense deal with Posey’s absence. Posey, quarterback Terrelle Pryor, offensive lineman Mike Adams, running back Dan Herron and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas are suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling memorabilia and receiving improper benefits. Tressel will join them for failing to report their violations. OSU has until July 5 to respond to the NCAA’s questions and will meet with the Committee on Infractions on Aug. 12. read more

No 14 Ohio State mens hockey prepares for weekend series versus No

The Ohio State-Michigan football game is more than a week away, but the bitter rivalry between both schools will be in action this weekend on the ice. The No. 14 OSU men’s hockey team (8-3-1, 5-2-1) will face No. 7 Michigan (7-3-2, 3-3-2), in a two-game series starting Friday night in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Buckeyes, ranked for the first time this season, are currently on a five-game winning streak and unbeaten in their last seven games. OSU head coach Mark Osiecki is looking forward to the test facing Michigan on the road will pose for his team. “We know what to expect playing against Michigan,” he said. “We expect a well-coached team, and a team that plays at a high level and competes.” Playing at Michigan is always fun for senior forward Danny Dries, a Michigan native. “Being from around there, it’s always fun to have family and friends around and play in front of them,” he said. “It’s a pretty fun environment. Youcan’t let it intimidate you.” Senior goalie Cal Heeter said that playing Michigan is special because of the historic rivalry between the two schools, but that the real importance of the games are the conference points that could be gained. “We have to realize and respect the rivalry for both schools. On top of that, the CCHA points are important for this team,” he said. OSU is currently tied for second in the CCHA with 17 points. Michigan has 12 points and stands alone in sixth place. Osiecki attributes the recent success to players gelling and coming together as one. “Whether they’ve had a lot of playing time or a little, they’ve done well,” he said. One of the things OSU has done well is play disciplined. OSU has had a season-low four penalties in each of their past four games. When the Buckeyes have had to play a man down during the five-game winning streak, they’ve been perfect, killing all 19 of their opponents’ power plays. “We have done some things in practice to make our guys move their feet and keep their sticks down,” Osiecki said. “I think that has been a big factor in us being smart and knowing we can play hard and stay out of the penalty box.” The Buckeyes have been no slouch on the offensive end either, outscoring their opponents, 27-6, during the seven-game unbeaten streak. OSU leads the CCHA with 3.38 goals per game in conference play. Heeter said he enjoys having a potent offense play in front of him, but that it can be tough to get into the flow of the game when he doesn’t have to make a ton of saves. “It’s different, it’s tough for sure,” he said. “It’s just a different element, something you have to get used to.” Michigan is second in the CCHA with 3.25 goals per game, and posted a season-high 10 goals in a game against St. Lawrence in October. OSU and Michigan are set to take the ice at 7:35 p.m. Friday and play again Saturday night. read more

Ohio State womens volleyball sweeps threegame DC Koehl Classic

Then-sophomore middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe (10) celebrates during a game against Penn State on Oct. 31, 2014. Credit: Lantern File PhotoThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team began its 2015 home schedule on Labor Day weekend with a trio of wins to take first place in the 10th annual Sports Imports D.C. Koehl Classic at St. John Arena.OSU (5-1) topped Northern Iowa (3-3) and Florida State (3-3) in a doubleheader on Saturday before beating the Seminoles for a second time on Sunday.A proficient .387 attack percentage helped OSU capture its second win of the weekend over No. 14 Florida State in four sets (25-19, 18-25, 25-13, 25-21).Middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe led her team with 19 points, by way of 15 kills, five blocks (one solo) and an ace. After being named to her second consecutive all-tournament team, the junior said her confidence is high; both in herself and in her team. “(We’re) ready to show what we’ve got and I’m really looking forward to these upcoming weekends,” Sandbothe said. “I think people should look out for the Buckeyes.”Senior outside hitter Elizabeth Campbell, who now is in her second season with OSU after transferring from Duke, led the team with 16 kills and also blocked four shots.Both OSU setters were used heavily, as freshman Taylor Hughes assisted on 24 Buckeye points and senior Emily Ruetter added 21 helpers.In the second game of the tournament, OSU won a back-and-forth match against No. 14 Florida State in five sets (21-25, 25-19, 20-25, 25-19, 15-11).The story of the game for both teams was defense. OSU held the Seminoles to a .102 attack percentage and tallied 14 blocks. The Buckeyes were held to a .110 attack percentage and had 15.5 shots blocked.A big reason for the defensive success of OSU was libero Valeria León, who had 32 digs, the fourth-highest single-game total in school history and a personal best for the junior from Puerto Rico.“It’s easy when my teammates around me are doing their jobs,” León said. “So I just do whatever I can to win the games. Our team is doing a really good job and I’m just trying to do my part.”Sandbothe came up big for the Buckeyes’ defense as well, with seven blocks (three solo). She added 17 kills and two aces to lead the Buckeyes with 24 points.Campbell and Hughes contributed to the win with double-doubles.Campbell, who also broke the 20-point mark, had 20 kills and 11 digs to go along with three blocks (one solo).Hughes had 42 assists and 13 digs, providing the OSU offense with a spark after entering the game in the middle of the first set with her team struggling. The freshman also added four kills, four blocks and two aces.Before handling Florida State twice, OSU swept its first match of the weekend against Northern Illinois (25-21, 25-18, 25-14) and never trailed in the first or third set.The Buckeyes did trail for most of the second frame but mounted an impressive comeback. With Northern Illinois up 17-14, OSU went on an 11-1 run to take the set.Senior outside hitter Katie Mitchell helped to lead the Buckeyes, racking up 13 kills at a .250 attack percentage. Sandbothe had an efficient showing with 10 kills on a .625 attack percentage and three blocks.In her first game in St. John Arena, the Texas Tech transfer Ruetter had 30 assists, seven digs and four blocks.Sandbothe was named the tournament MVP thanks to her team-leading 55 points on 42 kills, 16 blocks and three aces. Campbell (45 kills, 25 digs) and León (58 digs) were also named to the all-tournament team.Sandbothe said she was proud of her team’s performance, but feels they have even more to show moving forward.“I think that we had a lot to prove today and we think we have a lot to still prove, but I was really proud of the way we came out and the heart we had and showed,” she said. “And winning MVP, having the greatest teammates, the greatest support staff, is really, really special.”OSU is set to head back out on the road next weekend as they take part in the Blackbird Invitational in Brooklyn, New York. The Buckeyes are scheduled to take on host LIU Brooklyn at 7 p.m. on Friday, followed by matches against Syracuse at 10 a.m. and Arizona at 5 p.m., on Saturday. read more

Tuchel not yet concerned over Liverpool as he looks forward to

first_imgParis Saint-German will be facing another Ligue 1 side on Friday and their coach Thomas Tuchel would not open up about playing Liverpool in their opening game in the Champions League while the media confronted him with the matter.PSG may be recording their five straight win in the opening of Ligue 1 this season but the inquisitive media would jump beyond that to bring up the matter of the club going over to England on Tuesday to open their Champions League run against Liverpool.But this curiosity of the media never caught the club manager’s fancy as he wasn’t going to engage the matter yet.Opinion: Neymar needs to apologize to PSG’s supporters Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 After such a dramatic summer during the transfer window, Neymar truly needs to apologize to all the PSG supporters this weekend.When Neymar finished last…“This is not the subject,” he said, according to Mail Online.“Today is about Saint Etienne and everyone in the club should be aware that it’s important.”“I did not know nobody had ever done it. We want to win, it’s clear, but I expect a tough match against a disciplined opponent, for which I have a lot of respect.”last_img read more

TCI mourns the passing of an education icon

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, July 8, 2016 – The Ministry of Education and the nation mourns today the passing of iconic educator, Louise Thomas.  Thomas had recently taken up post at the Enid Capron Primary School and died due to illness, we are told, at hospital in The Bahamas this morning. last_img

Markets recover after early losses Sensex up over 100 points Nifty at

first_imgThe S&P BSE Sensex was trading higher at 25,151, a gain of about 106 points or 0.43% at 1.05 pm on Monday, after opening at a loss of 100 points and breaking the 24,000 mark, tracking Asian markets, concerns over falling crude oil prices and waiting for the US Fed decision on rate hike.Tata Steel, Hindustan Uniliver, Coal India, Sun Pharma, Maruti Suzuki and Infosys were trading with gains, while Tata Motors, Bharti Airtel, ONGC and TCS were losers.Infosys was up 1.41% at Rs 1,067 on news of its $3 million in Whoop, an early stage company that offers performance optimisation systems for elite professional sporting teams. In a regulatory filing to the BSE, the Bengaluru-based company said that the deal will be completed by 16 December, 2015. Infosys will have a minority stake that won’t exceed 20% in Whoop Inc.In a related development, Infosys said that it will be announcing its third quarter results on 14 January, 2016.Asian stock markets were also trading lower, with the Nikkei down 1.8% in the afternoon trade, recovering from a loss of 3% in early morning trade.Meanwhile, falling crude oil prices due to a glut could influence the decision of the US Fed later this week when it meets to decide on a likely interest rate hike.”Lower crude oil prices will encourage deflationary conditions and interestingly, not only may it lead to further stimulus in Eurozone but also it will be one of the major point of discussion during the Fed meeting as inflation is inversely proportional to interest rates – which may lead to Fed rethink on adopting a hawkish policy,” an analyst wrote in Business Today.last_img read more

Sensex spurts on Economic Surveys optimistic projection for FY17

first_imgIndian stock markets, which had trimmed the morning session gains during the afternoon trade on Friday, were up almost one percent after the government tabled the Economic Survey 2015-2016, projecting a GDP growth rate for 2016-2017 in the range of 7 to 7.75 percent. The S&P BSE Sensex was trading at 23,203, with a gain of 226 points, or 0.99 percent, at around 1.45 p.m.The biggest Sensex gainer was India’s largest lender State Bank of India, which was trading at Rs 155, up 4.11 percent; state-owned miner Coal India, Larsen & Toubro, NTPC, BHEL and Axis Bank were also trading with a gain of 2 to 3.40 percent.On the NSE, the 50-scrip Nifty was trading with a similar gain of about one percent at 7,040, after slipping below the psychological mark of 7,000 during the afternoon trade. Most of the sectoral indices were up, except for auto. The rupee, which opened lower at 68.73 and plunged to 68.79 to the US dollar, recovered and was trading at about 68.71, though not far away from its all-time low of 68.85 hit in August 2013.”The intra-day range is seen between 68.60-68.85 levels,” IFA Global said in its note on Friday.The yield on the Indian 10-year benchmark 7.72% maturing 2025 had risen to to 8.07% on account of system-wide liquidity shortfall, but eased later after the survey was tabled in Parliament.On Friday, the government’s Economic Survey 2015-2016 forecast the economy to grow between 7 and 7.75 percent in FY2017, almost flat from the advance estimate of 7.6 percent for the current year released last month.last_img read more

A true friend for farmers

first_imgEmdadul Haque is helping a farmer to wear Mathal and mask at Kaliganj of Jhenaidah. Photo: Prothom AloNannu Mia was tending to his vegetable field, sweating under the scorching sun. There was no tree or any sort of shade for a moment of respite.Suddenly a man appeared with a ‘mathal’, the traditional wide straw hat worn by farmers. He handed it to over to Nannu Mia so the farmer could shade himself from the relentless rays of the sun.Again, whenever a farmer sprays his field with pesticide, this man rushes forward with a mask. He helps the farmer wear the mask to avoid inhaling the toxic chemical fumes.This person also provides soap to the farmers so that they can bathe properly at the end of the day when they return home after toiling in the fields. He also gives them mosquito nets to ensure they have a sound sleep.This is Kazi Emdadul Haque. In his locality, he is known as a friend of the farmers.He has established a night school so the illiterate farmers may get a basic education. Around 500 farmers have received literacy lessons at these schools so far. He advises farmers and trains them in making earthworm fertiliser to lessen the use of chemicals in the soil.Emdadul, a resident of Daulatpur of Kaliganj, Jhenaidah, also ensures that the farmers record their blood groups.He has been working for the farmers over a decade.Emdad teaches at a local madrasa free of cost. He runs his family on fees he earns from private tuition at home and also from farming. He saves money and spends it on the welfare of the farmers.His father Kazi Abdul Wahed, now deceased, was involved in social welfare besides farming. People in the locality still remember him.Emdad, inspired by his father’s social welfare activities, also decided to do something for the people. In 2006 he consulted a few of his neighbours at his home in 2006 and started holding regular meetings at night in his village. He would teach at the meetings and help the farmers with their various problems.In the beginning he made a list of farmers of 11 villages in his union, Kola. He made a list of the farmers who did not have ‘mathals’ to protect them from the sun and who did not wear masks while spraying pesticide and supplied them with the hats and masks. He has provided over a thousand of these straw hats over a thousand masks so far.Mominur Rahman, a resident of Kamalhat village, said, “When Emdad Bhai sees a farmer without a ‘mathal’, he rushes to him with a hat.”Night school and other activitiesEmdad noticed that illiteracy was an obstacle for the farmers. It was hard for them to carry out the instructions of the agriculture department as they could not take down written notes. So he established night schools in his locality. He made over 500 farmers literate by establishing 13 night schools in eight villages. He has used government primary schools for the purpose.Emdadul said many farmers do not bathe properly after returning home from the field. They also do not use mosquito nets at night. He distributed soap and mosquito nets among farmers and made them aware of the importance of using these.Emdadul Haque received training on earthworm fertiliser from a local voluntary organisation. Now he provides this training to the villagers. He also distributes earthworms to the farmers. Many farmers of Kola union now make and use earthworm fertiliser and sell it too. Their crops are now free of toxic chemicals and the fertility of the land is increasing.Kaliganj upazila agriculture officer Zahidul Karim said the local agriculture department is happy with Emdadul’s work and has established an agriculture library at his home.Farmer Azizur Rahman said he can now read and write after attending the school set up by Emdad.Emdad has two daughters and a son. He earns Tk 10,000 per month on private tuition. He spends Tk 6,000 for his family and the rest for the farmers.Emdad said he has engaged more people to assist the farmers. He has established an institution in his father’s name, the Kazi Abdul Wahed Memorial Foundation. He is the president of this foundation.Kola union parishad chairman Ayub Hossain said the people’s representatives could not do what Emdad has done for the welfare of the people.Kaliganj upazila nirbahi officer Subarna Rani Saha highly appreciated Emdadul Haque.“We have many people who are working to change the society. They are very good. Kazi Emdadul Haque is one of them,” said Subarna Rani Saha.*This report, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Rabiul Islam.last_img read more

Ebola Vaccinations Begin in Rural Congo on Monday Ministry

first_imgBy SALEH MWANAMILONGO, Associated PressKINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Ebola vaccinations will begin Monday in the two rural areas of Congo where the latest deadly outbreak was declared this month, the health ministry said Saturday, as the number of confirmed Ebola cases rose to 35, including 10 deaths.A vaccination campaign is already under way in Mbandaka, the city of 1.2 million on the Congo River where four Ebola cases have been confirmed. About 100 health workers have been vaccinated there as front-line workers face high risk from the virus, which is spread via contact with the bodily fluids of those infected, including the dead.In this photo taken Friday, May 25, 2018, UNICEF staffer Jean Claude Nzengu, center, talks with members of an Ebola vaccination team as they prepare to administer the vaccine in an Ebola-affected community in the north-western city of Mbandaka, in Congo. (Mark Naftalin/UNICEF via AP)The vaccination campaign will begin Monday in the rural areas of Bikoro and Iboko in the country’s northwest, health ministry spokeswoman Jessica Ilunga told The Associated Press.“The health minister can be found at this moment in Bikoro for assessing the preparations for the vaccination campaign,” Ilunga said.Of the 10 confirmed Ebola deaths, five have occurred in Bikoro, two in Iboko and three in the Wangata area of Mbandaka.In addition to the confirmed Ebola cases there are also 13 probable cases and six suspected ones, the health ministry said.The World Health Organization emergencies chief has said the next few weeks are crucial in determining whether the outbreak can be brought under control. Complicating factors include its spread to a major city, the fact that health workers have been infected and the existence of three or four “separate epicenters” that make finding and monitoring contacts of infected people more difficult.WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told a meeting in Geneva on Saturday that “I am personally committed to ensuring that we do everything we can to stop this outbreak as soon as possible.”This is Congo’s ninth Ebola outbreak since 1976, when the hemorrhagic fever was first identified.There is no specific treatment for Ebola. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pain and at times internal and external bleeding. The virus can be fatal in up to 90 percent of cases, depending on the strain.WHO is using a “ring vaccination” approach, targeting the contacts of people infected or suspected of infection and then the contacts of those people. More than 600 contacts have been identified.WHO also is accelerating efforts with nine neighboring countries to try to prevent the Ebola outbreak from spreading there, saying the regional risk is high. It has warned against international travel and trade restrictions.___Associated Press writer Geir Moulson in Berlin contributed.last_img read more

Bowie Man Indicted For Defrauding Veterans Administration

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, Staff Writer, mgray@afro.comA Bowie man was indicted on 20 counts for defrauding the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (V.A.) of $300,000 by a federal grand jury for allegedly using his business to deceive a program for disabled military veterans on April 22.Francis Engles, 63, is alleged to have used his company, Engles Security Training School, which he co-owned and operated, to overcharge the V.A.’s Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program for services that either were shortened, or not performed altogether. After an extensive federal investigation, Engles was arrested on April 18 then indicted four days later.A Bowie man was indicted on 20 counts for defrauding the United States Department of Veterans Affairs of $300,000, after turning in misleading information about a program for disabled veterans on April 22. (Courtesy Photo)According to the Soldier of Fortune military blog, the formal announcement was made by representatives of the law enforcement agencies who collaborated on the investigation. Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Jessie K. Liu for the District of Columbia, Special Agent in Charge Matthew J. DeSarno of the FBI’s Washington Field Office Criminal Division and Special Agent in Charge Kim Lampkins of the V.A. Office of Inspector General (OIG), Mid-Atlantic Field Office made the public statement after unsealing the indictment.Engles Security became an approved vendor of the VR&E program in 2015. The VR&E program is designed to help disabled military veterans with education and employment-related services. The Temple Hill-based company specialized in security guard and related courses.   The indictment claims Engles falsified documents regarding how he administered it’s course.However, the investigation found evidence that the company provided veterans far less than what Engles presented to the Veterans Administration. He allegedly submitted documents to the V.A. stating that he was providing 15 veterans with months-long courses for 40 hours per week and over 600 total hours.  However, in some instances, he allegedly offered only a few hours of class per day, while claiming that the students were in class for 40 hours per week.According to the indictment, Engles frequently cancelled classes without notice or any provision to make them up. Instructors often were late and ended class early.   Engles is also alleged to have ended some classes after less than a month although he represented to the V.A. that the veterans’ classes would last for several months.The elaborate scheme also included Engles allegedly creating and sending to the V.A. “Certificates of Training” stating that veterans had completed courses that they had not completed or taken.  Engles allegedly submitted letters to the V.A. falsely stating that the veterans had been employed by his private security business.  Engles also allegedly instructed veterans to sign attendance sheets representing that they had attended class sessions, which they didn’t attend.Engles allegedly charged the VA thousands of dollars more for veterans’ courses than he charged non-veterans who took the same or similar courses. The V.A. paid Engles Security over $300,000 for the education of 15 veterans.The FBI’s Washington Field Office and the V.A. OIG are leading the investigating the case.  Trial Attorney Simon J. Cataldo of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney David Misler of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia are lead in prosecuting the case.There hasn’t been an announcement about when the trial will begin or what jurisdiction will hear it.last_img read more

PM Modi Hasina inaugurate Bangladesh Bhavan

first_imgSantiniketan (West Bengal): Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bangladeshi counterpart Sheikh Hasina inaugurated the Bangladesh Bhavan here on Friday to symbolically highlight the warm bilateral cultural ties between the two countries. The inauguration of Bangladesh Bhavan inside the Vishwa Bharti University complex took place in the presence of West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee.The Bangladesh Bhavan features a museum that showcases renowned poet Rabindranath Tagore’s association with that country, the Liberation War of Bangladesh and Indo-Bangla relations. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIt has been built at a cost of Rs. 25 crores, which was provided by the Bangladesh government.A fund of Rs. 10 crores would be given to help maintain the museum premises.Reportedly, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will also be signed between Vishwa Bharati University and the Secondary and Higher Secondary Division of the Bangladesh education ministry.Prime Minister Hasina, who is on a two-day visit to India, on the invitation of Prime Minister Modi, was received by Banerjee.As per reports, both Prime Ministers will hold a bilateral meeting.Prime Minister Hasina will return to Bangladesh on Saturday night.last_img read more

February 18 2003 A team of new workshoppers is as

first_imgFebruary 18, 2003A team of new workshoppers is assigned to the rebar crew. [Photo & Text: sa] Construction crew members Gabriel Hendrix and Brad Bishop instruct workshoppers Chiara Voicu and Michael Ray Teslow in the art of tying rebar. [Photo & Text: sa] Michael and Chiara work on the third floor beam of the East Crescent Complex. [Photo & Text: sa] The partially finished beam. [Photo & Text: sa]last_img

Weve written before about the idea of personalize

first_imgWe’ve written before about the idea of personalized medicine and how an increasing number of doctors and research scientists seek to move away from the one-size-fits-all approach that has defined drug R&D and patient treatment for centuries. Today, the trend is to focus more on matching the biological characteristics of each person with the best treatment options available – and in the future even perhaps to develop specific drugs for specific patients. But it’s not just doctors who are moving toward more personalized health care. A growing number of average individuals is taking an interest in the concept as well. Thanks to advancements in technology, a revolution in data-driven personal health monitoring (often referred to as “self-quantification”) has become possible. This revolution is changing the face of health care as we know it. Gary Wolf is a self-described spokesman for the “self-quantification” movement. With the help of various wearable technologies and smartphone apps, Wolf regularly records approximately 20 of his own vital signs – including heart rate, glucose levels, blood pressure, and more. But he’s not collecting data for the sake of collecting data. He has successfully applied this self-analysis to get his high blood pressure under control. Not all self-trackers are as extreme as Wolf, but he is far from alone. The Quantified Self website has attracted thousands of self-trackers from around the world to share their knowledge and experiences. As the technologies improve and it becomes even easier to self-quantify, demand to do so will only increase. How much? According to ABI Research analyst Jonathan Collins, while a solid 30 million wearable, wireless monitoring devices (including those for medical and clinical use) were sold in the US last year, that figure is expected to balloon to 160 million devices a year by 2017. Furthermore, a recent report from IMS Research indicates that the wearable-technology market already generates $2 billion a year in sales, and will represent a minimum revenue opportunity of $6 billion a year by 2016. The market for wearable technologies in health care alone is projected to exceed $2.9 billion a year by 2016. A popular example of one of these “wearables” is the Basis B1 watch, which, in addition to telling time, has a number of sensors to provide an overview of one’s health. The device includes a heart-rate monitor, 3D accelerometer, thermometer, and galvanic skin response sensor. Then there is “Smart Clothing” from AiQ. The company’s BioMan T-shirt has ribbed “smart sleeves” that measure heart rate, respiration rate, and skin temperature and can be further customized to measure skin moisture and electrophysiological signals such as EKG, EEG, and EMG. There’s even a “Smart Bra” from First Warning Systems that measures minute variations in temperature caused by the growth of blood vessels that develop in the breast to supply cancerous tissue with blood. This could allow a tumor to be detected years before it would be visible in a traditional mammogram or even an MRI. In addition to wearables, smartphones will play a large role in the future of self-quantification. Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist and director of Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, California, says that advancements in smartphone technology and downloadable apps will help people take better control of their health by tracking it with increasing precision. In his book The Creative Destruction of Medicine, Topol describes how we will soon start running common medical tests on our smartphones, lessening the frequency of doctor’s office visits. Imagine a world in which you just take a picture of a rash on your skin with your smartphone, upload it to a medical app, and receive a tailored diagnosis. Or better yet, simply breathe into a sensor on your phone and receive a diagnosis for whatever ails you. That reality is probably still a long way off, and the technological hurdles are high; but it’s hard to imagine that it’s not coming. On the nearer horizon, modern wearable technologies could be supplanted by electronic skin tattoos that monitor all kinds of things. We’re actually closer to this reality than you might think. Materials scientist John Rogers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign first demonstrated so-called “epidermal electronics” in his lab several years ago. These devices – which consist of ultrathin electronics, sensors, electrodes, and wireless power and communication systems – could theoretically attach to the skin and record and transmit electrophysiological measurements for medical purposes. Early versions of the technology were not rugged enough to stand up to the activities of everyday life, but Rogers has now figured out how to “print” the electronic tattoo directly onto the skin so it can be worn for up to two weeks. Rogers is now focused on developing and refining the wireless power sources and communication systems that need to be integrated into the system. He says the technology could potentially be commercialized within the next couple of years. Whatever the timeline for electronic skin tattoos and other technologies that help us self-quantify, we think it’s safe to say that this revolution we’re seeing in personal health monitoring will only pick up steam along the way. Analysts from Ernst & Young predict that over the next decade as much as 50% of health care will shift out of the hospital and clinic, and we will increasingly conduct virtual visits with doctors and nurses through our mobile devices. These changes will require new roles and business models across the board; but at the end of the day, it’s hard to argue against better, more frequent access to information about what’s going on inside our bodies, in order to allow us to live healthier lives. Bits & Bytes Yet More Leaked Samsung Galaxy S IV Pics Appear Hours Before Launch (TechCrunch) Samsung is unveiling a new version of its flagship phone tonight. The phone will be called the Galaxy S4. The latest leaked photos show a device that looks a lot like the company’s previous flagship phone, the Galaxy S3. While the phone may lack a new design, it’s rumored that it will include several bold, new features such as floating touch, which allows users to hover a finger over the screen to interact with it. The Gigabot 3D Lets You Print Things that Are Bigger than a Few Breadboxes (TechCrunch) The standard crop of 3D printers is all well and good, but what about those times when you need to print something really big? Austin-based startup re:3D has built a machine that could fill that void. It’s called the Gigabot, and it is touted as being the first large-format 3D printer designed for the home. In Your Pocket, a Lost-and-Found (New York Times) Here’s a neat gadget for those who are prone to losing stuff. The Linquet Mini is a small dongle that you can place on any item you might lose and connect it to your smartphone with Bluetooth. Provided the tagged items stay in a specified range of the smartphone, everything will remain silent. But when any tagged item is moved out of range, the smartphone will sound an alarm. Engineering College Lets Students Shop with Biometric Scans Instead of Credit Cards (Popular Science) South Dakota School of Mines is trying out a new way to pay for things. Instead of using cash and cards, students pay by linking accounts to their fingerprints. The main difference between this technology and existing technologies is that it detects hemoglobin, making it nearly impossible for a criminal to steal your identity.last_img read more

Every time I write an article that mentions god –

first_imgEvery time I write an article that mentions god – even if used as a descriptive reference to “the gods” – I get insulting and arrogant comments from atheists. And it’s not just me; you can see the same thing all over the Internet. To put it simply, these people are bullies, striking unbidden with fast, hard blows. It’s not about truth; it’s about dominance. Not all atheists do this, obviously. I have quite a few atheist friends who are decent, kind people. But an abusive strain of atheism has taken root in recent years, and I think it’s time to confront it. Here’s the key: The goal of these bullies is not to find truth or even to defend it; it’s to put down other people – to insult, humiliate and laugh at the fools who believe in any sort of god, even people who use references to god. These people slash and burn. They labor to destroy, not to build. I used to have a standing offer: that I would publish any atheist book that did not criticize, but instead told people how atheism would make their lives better. The result? No one ever submitted a manuscript. The Irony of It All Last week I wrote an article entitled Are you a Gorilla or a God? In it, I explained that the worst of human behavior is gorilla-like and the best god-like. I went on to explain the gorilla side this way: Dominant gorillas seek status and the power to control others. The submissive apes seek to pass along their pain to the apes below them. In response to the article (which mentioned gods!), I received the business end of that atheistic slash and burn. But these people never realized that they were placing themselves precisely into the position I had assigned to the gorillas: slapping and biting smaller animals to make themselves dominant. A Defense of Atheism I don’t have a problem with atheism per se. I was actually raised as an atheist, by a mother whose love I never for a moment doubted. And, as I say, I have friends who are atheists. The opinion, by itself, doesn’t bother me. I think atheism is a valid opinion. I happen to disagree with it, but I disagree with a lot of things – that doesn’t mean I go about to destroy them all. Our goal should be to improve people, not to chop them up. One essential flaw I find with strident atheism is that no one can know enough to make that pronouncement. Here’s what I mean: I think it is 100% fair to say, “I’ve never seen evidence of a God, so I don’t think there is one.” Some atheists will say that putting God outside of the universe was merely a trick to avoid evidence. But even if it did begin as a trick, the idea stands on its own, and saying, “I know that there is no god at all, anywhere,” is unsound. But, again, to say, “I see no evidence and don’t think there’s a God” is an entirely fair and rational opinion. The Unfair Atheist Argument You’ve all seen the technique: The aggressive atheist picks their spot and pounces with references to the very worst examples of theism, and implies that all believers are that way. But most believers have no desire at all to burn witches or stone homosexuals. To paint them as being that way is not only unfair; it is abusive. These atheists will, of course, pull together abstract arguments, saying, “Your book says that, and you say you believe the book, so you defend burning witches.” The truth, however, is that modern believers want nothing to do with burning witches, inquisitions, or any other horrors. (In fact, they would oppose them strongly.) The atheists know this, of course; they’re just trying to slash and burn. A kinder, better atheist would say, “You believers really should explain why you no longer accept some of the things written in your book.” That would be honest and helpful. Can We All Get Along? Yes, of course we can. Only one thing needs to be absent (on both sides): the desire to injure and dominate. Atheists and theists can be friends and co-travelers. I’ve spent pleasant hours with evangelists for atheism. We disagreed, we got over it, and we enjoyed each other’s company. It really comes back to the basic principles that we learned as children: You don’t try to bully them, and they shouldn’t try to bully you. Play nice. It isn’t that hard. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.com What I don’t think is fair, is to say, “I know there is no such thing as God.” This is especially true regarding the Judeo-Christian God, who is said to exist beyond our universe. Until they can look beyond the universe, no one can say for sure.last_img read more

In This Issue   Only 3 currencies are up today

first_imgIn This Issue. *  Only 3 currencies are up today. *  Gold loses ground again! *  Aussie jobs report sends A$ down! *  A treat from the Ludwig von Mises Institute. And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts! The Dollar Swings Its Mighty Hammer. Good Day!  And a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday to you! It’s snowing again outside, but so far it’s just a dusting, no biggie. What a roller coaster ride this week’s weather has been! Much like the week for the currencies and metals. Our St. Louis U Billikens squeaked out a win last night, and I finished all my writing assignments ahead of time! Do I get a Gold Star? Well. The dollar is swinging its mighty hammer again this morning The euro, Swiss franc and Danish kroner are the only currencies with any gains VS the dollar this morning, while the Aussie dollar (A$) is bringing up the rear. The A$ loss overnight has been HUGE! And one has to wonder if it’s a little overdone, with the chance of a bounce-back at this point. I’m going to be talking about why now it’s more important than ever to be diversified in currencies and metals at one of my presentations in Orlando in two weeks. And one of the things I’m going to be talking about in that presentation is the fact that everyone, except me and a few others, is on the dollar’s side these days. Doesn’t that worry you? It does me. As I’ve seen this before folks. 2005, 2008, 2011 immediately pop into my mind as years that everyone jumped on the dollar’s bandwagon, but the euphoria didn’t have multi-year staying power, and eventually the dollar went right back to its underlying weak trend.  Long time readers know how I don’t like the phrase: This time it’s different. So, I don’t see how this time it will be different for the dollar, do you? Here’s why I think this dollar strength will all unwind eventually. In 2008, the Fed Heads and Treasury implanted extraordinary financial intervention to save the banking system from collapse. But to me, all they did was push the problems down the road a couple of years. And now that the Fed has decided to begin to unwind those programs, I believe all hell is going to break loose, and it could set the dollar up for its ultimate decline.   Now, it all might turn out to be seashells and balloons for the economy, and we’ll never look back on why we worried so much about the extraordinary financial programs, and I would be wrong.  But all that remains to be seen, eh? And if I am wrong, then I’ll go back and sue my economics professors! HA! But here’s something to think about regarding the economy’s strength. From MarketWatch yesterday. “The country’s top three mortgage lenders confirmed this week that new home loans dropped last year as mortgage rates rose, with earnings results Wednesday morning from Bank of America showing a 46% year-over-year drop in the fourth quarter.” And if the economy is so strong, then why did Macy’s and JC Penney announce store closings and jobs losses? At JC Penney, they’re going to close 33 stores and lay off 2,000 workers. Going on to other things. The December Labor Report for Australia printed as we suspected. weak!  Headline employment fell 23,000 in December.  November’s gain of 15,400 was in effect, wiped out. I don’t think the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) is going to panic at the disco here, and rush to cut rates. But it won’t take but one or two more of these weak labor reports before they do cut rates.  The data sent the Aussie dollar (A$) reeling and I mean reeling badly! As I said above, I don’t get why the A$ was punished this harshly, on a jobs report was not good, but also not horrible. So, to me the selling was overdone. We’ll have to see, eh? In the Eurozone this morning. Germany, which is the largest economy in the Eurozone, printed their CPI numbers, and they printed bang on with the forecasts of a .4% gain in December, and an annualized increase of 1.2%… This was a good print for Germany and the Eurozone as a whole, for the recent trend in consumer inflation for the region was on a downward path, so the euro was rewarded for this data. The return of the Carry Trade! I had just hit the “send” button yesterday when a story shot across the screens pronouncing the return of the Carry Trade. OK. long time readers know all about the Carry Trade of the past. Sell yen, and buy a high yielding currency like Aussie or kiwi..  Well, here we go again. The funding currency now can be one of many given the zero interest rate policies of Japan, U.S., Swiss, Eurozone,  and the currency to buy has changed to the Brazilian real.  This won’t make the leaders in Brazil too happy.  For they still want a real that’s not too weak to invite inflation, and not to strong, to hurt exports, but one that’s just right. Yeah, like the Goldilocks and the 3 Bears story. The problem is that Central Banks very rarely get a Goldilocks currency level. So, if the story is correct, and this is the new Carry Trade, the Brazilian Central Bank and Gov’t are going to have to get used to some currency strength. If they don’t think that will happen to the real when it’s used as the buying currency in the Carry Trade, they should call up the Central Bankers in Australia and New Zealand, for they know the truth! The Chinese renminbi / yuan was pushed down again the Peoples Bank of China (PBOC) last night. The roller coaster ride in renminbi / yuan just keeps going, but I don’t worry about these downward moves in the currency. They are just speed bumps.  I do wonder about the news I saw on the Bloomberg this morning though, that China’s holdings of U.S. Treasuries increased $12.2 Billion in November.  I thought the Chinese said they saw no reason to continue to add Treasuries? Well, I had better go back and check when they said that. I’ll be right back! OK, I’m back, did you miss me? HA! Well, from my archives, I see it was around the end of November that the Chinese said that. So, just like a star that burns its brightest right before it goes dark. Maybe the Chinese made this one last truck load buy of Treasuries and then did a Roberto Duran, and said, “no mas”.   For it’s not like the Chinese to say one thing and do another. Recall the other day when I wrote a quickie about Bitcoin? Well, in that quickie, I talked about a “lot of stuff” that gives me the willies about Bitcoin, and yesterday, my colleague and friend, Jack Stapleton, sent me an article by Louis Basenese on a very scary technical flaw he found with Bitcoin. I’m sure it will take a day or two before he allows his article to be posted on the internet, so look for it. I know Louis, and he’s very good at researching things, so take his words with many grains of salt. Yesterday, the U.S. Data Cupboard printed a couple of items for us to look at. First, there was the December PPI (wholesale inflation), which came in as expected at +.4%, and +1.2% year on year.  But that should remove some of the sweat from the Fed Heads’ foreheads, as they fear deflation Big Time.  We also saw the TIC Flows. Remember when the markets would get all lathered up on this data, which shows the net foreign purchases of Treasuries? For if the foreigners didn’t buy enough Treasuries the deficit would not be financed correctly. But then the Fed began buying Treasuries by the boat load, and this data became non-interesting. But with the unwinding of the Fed buying of Treasuries going on, will this data become important once again? Probably not. For in reality, I don’t see the Fed buying to ever stop. But for those of you keeping score at home, the Net TIC Flows were a negative $16.6 Billion! That means that we didn’t see many foreign buyers.  This Monetizing of the debt (bond buying by the Fed) is really going to end up being a problem for the U.S. economy folks. My spider sense is tingling on this. I’ve talked so much about this monetizing of the debt that a long time reader, Bob, sent me something that made me laugh, and so I thought to share it with you!  You know those Direct TV adds, where they say, so you get frustrated with cable, and when you get frustrated you. and so on?  Well, Bob did one on Monetizing Debt. When you print money you monetize your debt. When you monetize your debt you think you owe less money. When you think you owe less money you go and spend more money you don’t have. When you spend money you don’t have you go bankrupt. When you go bankrupt your creditors seize your house. When you have no house you are homeless, put your belongings in a shopping cart and sleep in a underpass under newspapers. While sleeping in an underpass someone steals your shopping cart. Don’t let anyone steel your shopping cart, stop printing money. Thanks Bob! Before I head to the Big Finish we have some filing to do. And Under the Question of Did you know? Lies the information that’s going around right now, that 70% of the time, the first 10 days of the year were indicative of how stocks would do the rest of the year. The statistics date back to 1940. So, a good number of years, eh?  I guess given the softness of the stock market the first 10 days, one would be leery of what will happen by year’s end.  For What it’s Worth. I have a rather long one for you today from the Mises Institute. I did only print a snippet of the article that talks about how hyperinflation ruins a currency. Then goes on to talk about how the U.S. wants inflation to rise.  Let’s listen in. “Our monetary leaders do not understand the true nature of money and banking; thus, they advocate monetary expansion as the cure for every economic ill. The multiple quantitative easing programs perfectly illustrate this mindset. Furthermore, our monetary leaders actually advocate a steady increase in the price level, what is popularly known as inflation. Like previous hyperinflations throughout time, the actions that produce an American hyperinflation will be seen as necessary, proper, patriotic, and ethical; just as they were seen by the monetary authorities in Weimar Germany and modern Zimbabwe. Neither the German nor the Zimbabwean monetary authorities were willing to admit that there was any alternative to their inflationist policies. The same will happen in America. The most likely trigger to hyperinflation is an increase in prices following a loss of confidence in the dollar overseas and its repatriation to our shores. Committed to a low interest rate policy, our monetary authorities will dismiss the only legitimate option to printing more money – allowing interest rates to rise. Only the noninflationary investment by the public in government bonds would prevent a rise in the price level, but such an action would trigger a recession. This necessary and inevitable event will be vehemently opposed by our government, just as it has been for several years to this date. Instead, the government will demand and the Fed will acquiesce in even further expansions to the money supply via direct purchases of these government bonds, formerly held by our overseas trading partners. This will produce even higher levels of inflation, of course. Then, in order to prevent the loss of purchasing power by politically connected groups, the government will print even more money to fund special payouts to these groups.” Chuck again. I love reading stuff form the Ludwig von Mises Institute.  The whole article posted on their site is full of information on how the U.S. is moving toward a hyperinflationary economy, and in the end what that will do to the dollar.   So, if you like Austrian economics theory, like I do, then you might want to visit this site now and then. To recap.  The dollar is swinging its mighty hammer again this morning, with only 3 currencies, euro, Swiss francs, and Danish kroner, showing some gains VS the dollar.  Gold is down again this morning, as everyone, but Chuck and few others, are jumping on the strong U.S. economy and dollar bandwagon. We saw this in 2005, 2008, and 2011 folks, will we see it all end badly for the dollar again? Aussie jobs report was weak (-23K) and the A$ got whacked! Looks a bit overdone to Chuck. Currencies today 1/16/14. American Style: A$ .8785, kiwi .8305, C$ .9150, euro 1.3615, sterling 1.6340, Swiss $1.1015, . European Style: rand 10.9125, krone 6.1625, SEK 6.4755, forint 221.00, zloty 3.0635, forint 20.2050, RUB 33.39, yen 104.60, sing 1.2730, HKD 7.7550, INR 61.53, China 6.1065, pesos 13.29, BRL 2.3740, Dollar Index 81, Oil $94.63, 10-year 2.89%, Silver $20.03, Platinum $1,423.56, Palladium $740.79, and Gold. $1,238.92 That’s it for today. I just saw a guy on TV promoting his book that talks about how difficult it is to be a “man” these days. Really? You know, a term that I no longer hear, is that, “he’s man’s man”  Oh well. Nice win by the Billikens last night. Tonight our Blues play again, they have to jam in as many games as they can, as the NHL will take a two week break for the Olympics in Feb. Little Braden Charles and Everett Patrick were at the house yesterday, I caught them both jumping on the bed. they were having a blast, laughing, and having fun, but mean old me, made them stop. They were too cute!  They will be a handful as they get older.  Well, two more days and then I’ll be gone for awhile. I’m so looking forward to next week.  and with that, I’ll get out of your hair for today. I hope you have a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday! Chuck Butler President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837last_img read more

Since Zika emerged as a threat to babies it has b

first_imgSince Zika emerged as a threat to babies, it has been a mystery exactly how much of a danger the mosquito-borne virus poses to children.But now, the largest study to follow kids who were exposed to the virus in the womb is providing more answers.The study involved 1,450 babies who had been exposed to the virus, and who were 1-year-old by February 2018. Six percent were born with birth defects, and 14 percent developed problems that could be blamed on the virus by the time they turned 1, the study found.”We’re beginning to see the full spectrum of the impact of Zika,” says Margaret Honein, director of the Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC released the study Tuesday.”This is really our first look at how these children are doing as they grow and develop, and really emphasizes that the Zika story is not over, particularly for these children,” Honein says.Zika triggered an international public health emergency in 2016 when a large outbreak in Brazil revealed that the virus could cause babies to be born with very small heads and severely damaged brains when pregnant women get infected. The condition is called microcephaly.It slowly has become more apparent that Zika-exposed babies could develop a range of other problems as well, including seizures, damaged vision and developmental disorders.The CDC reported last year that about 5 percent of babies exposed in the womb are born with microcephaly and other birth defects. But the extent of the risk as children get older is just now starting to become clear.The new analysis included babies born in U.S. territories such as Puerto Rico and in U.S. freely associated states, such as the Marshall Islands. It found that the risk for birth defects including microcephaly and vision damage is slightly higher — about 6 percent. And 1 in 7 — 14 percent — developed some kind of problem that could have been caused by the virus by their first birthday.For example, 20 babies in the new analysis whose heads were normal at birth had microcephaly by the time they turned 1.”That happened because their brain was not growing and developing properly,” Honein says.Babies also developed complications including cognitive problems, difficulties walking, moving and swallowing, and seizures.”It’s really important that parents and doctors work together to make sure children get all the evaluations they need, even if they look healthy when they are born,” Honein says.For example, only about one-third of the Zika-exposed babies in the study had an eye exam by an eye specialist.It’s also important to continue to follow these children, she says.”We are still in the early stages of learning about Zika. So we don’t yet know what sort of problems might emerge when the children are 2 years old or 3 years old or when they reach school age,” Honein says.There are no major Zika outbreaks occurring right now. But Honein stresses Zika is still being transmitted in many countries and outbreaks still could occur.So pregnant women and couples trying to conceive should continue to protect themselves while living or visiting places where Zika is being transmitted. The virus is primarily spread by mosquitoes, but can also be spread sexually.The CDC on Tuesday also issued new interim guidance for men who were exposed to the virus. The agency is now recommending these men wait three months after exposure before trying to conceive. The CDC had previously recommended waiting six months. But the latest science suggests the virus doesn’t remain infectious in semen as long as previously thought. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Back in the 1960s a Harvard graduate student made

first_imgBack in the 1960s, a Harvard graduate student made a landmark discovery about anger.At age 34, Jean Briggs traveled above the Arctic Circle and lived out on the tundra for 17 months. There were no roads, no heating systems, no grocery stores. Winter temperatures could easily dip below minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit.Briggs persuaded an Inuit family to “adopt” her and “try to keep her alive,” as the anthropologist wrote in 1970.At the time, many Inuit families lived similar to the way their ancestors had for thousands of years. They built igloos in the winter and tents in the summer. “And we ate only what the animals provided, such as fish, seal and caribou,” says Myna Ishulutak, a film producer and language teacher who lived a similar lifestyle as a young girl.Briggs quickly realized something remarkable was going on in these families: The adults had an extraordinary ability to control their anger.”They never acted in anger toward me, although they were angry with me an awful lot,” Briggs told the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in an interview.Even just showing a smidgen of frustration or irritation was considered weak and childlike, Briggs observed.For instance, one time someone knocked a boiling pot of tea across the igloo, damaging the ice floor. No one changed their expression. “Too bad,” the offender said calmly and went to refill the teapot.In another instance, a fishing line — which had taken days to braid — immediately broke on the first use. No one flinched in anger. “Sew it together,” someone said quietly.By contrast, Briggs seemed like a wild child, even though she was trying very hard to control her anger. “My ways were so much cruder, less considerate and more impulsive,” she told the CBC. “[I was] often impulsive in an antisocial sort of way. I would sulk or I would snap or I would do something that they never did.”Briggs, who died in 2016, wrote up her observations in her first book, Never in Anger. But she was left with a lingering question: How do Inuit parents instill this ability in their children? How do Inuit take tantrum-prone toddlers and turn them into cool-headed adults?Then in 1971, Briggs found a clue.She was walking on a stony beach in the Arctic when she saw a young mother playing with her toddler — a little boy about 2 years old. The mom picked up a pebble and said, “‘Hit me! Go on. Hit me harder,'” Briggs remembered.The boy threw the rock at his mother, and she exclaimed, “Ooooww. That hurts!”Briggs was completely befuddled. The mom seemed to be teaching the child the opposite of what parents want. And her actions seemed to contradict everything Briggs knew about Inuit culture.”I thought, ‘What is going on here?’ ” Briggs said in the radio interview.Turns out, the mom was executing a powerful parenting tool to teach her child how to control his anger — and one of the most intriguing parenting strategies I’ve come across.No scolding, no timeoutsIt’s early December in the Arctic town of Iqaluit, Canada. And at 2 p.m., the sun is already calling it a day. Outside, the temperature is a balmy minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. A light snow is swirling.I’ve come to this seaside town, after reading Briggs’ book, in search of parenting wisdom, especially when it comes to teaching children to control their emotions. Right off the plane, I start collecting data.I sit with elders in their 80s and 90s while they lunch on “country food” —stewed seal, frozen beluga whale and raw caribou. I talk with moms selling hand-sewn sealskin jackets at a high school craft fair. And I attend a parenting class, where day care instructors learn how their ancestors raised small children hundreds — perhaps even thousands — of years ago.Across the board, all the moms mention one golden rule: Don’t shout or yell at small children.Traditional Inuit parenting is incredibly nurturing and tender. If you took all the parenting styles around the world and ranked them by their gentleness, the Inuit approach would likely rank near the top. (They even have a special kiss for babies, where you put your nose against the cheek and sniff the skin.)The culture views scolding — or even speaking to children in an angry voice — as inappropriate, says Lisa Ipeelie, a radio producer and mom who grew up with 12 siblings. “When they’re little, it doesn’t help to raise your voice,” she says. “It will just make your own heart rate go up.”Even if the child hits you or bites you, there’s no raising your voice?”No,” Ipeelie says with a giggle that seems to emphasize how silly my question is. “With little kids, you often think they’re pushing your buttons, but that’s not what’s going on. They’re upset about something, and you have to figure out what it is.”Traditionally, the Inuit saw yelling at a small child as demeaning. It’s as if the adult is having a tantrum; it’s basically stooping to the level of the child, Briggs documented.Elders I spoke with say intense colonization over the past century is damaging these traditions. And, so, the community is working hard to keep the parenting approach intact.Goota Jaw is at the front line of this effort. She teaches the parenting class at the Arctic College. Her own parenting style is so gentle that she doesn’t even believe in giving a child a timeout for misbehaving.”Shouting, ‘Think about what you just did. Go to your room!’ ” Jaw says. “I disagree with that. That’s not how we teach our children. Instead you are just teaching children to run away.”And you are teaching them to be angry, says clinical psychologist and author Laura Markham. “When we yell at a child — or even threaten with something like ‘I’m starting to get angry,’ we’re training the child to yell,” says Markham. “We’re training them to yell when they get upset and that yelling solves problems.”In contrast, parents who control their own anger are helping their children learn to do the same, Markham says. “Kids learn emotional regulation from us.”I asked Markham if the Inuit’s no-yelling policy might be their first secret of raising cool-headed kids. “Absolutely,” she says.Playing soccer with your headNow at some level, all moms and dads know they shouldn’t yell at kids. But if you don’t scold or talk in an angry tone, how do you discipline? How do you keep your 3-year-old from running into the road? Or punching her big brother?For thousands of years, the Inuit have relied on an ancient tool with an ingenious twist: “We use storytelling to discipline,” Jaw says.Jaw isn’t talking about fairy tales, where a child needs to decipher the moral. These are oral stories passed down from one generation of Inuit to the next, designed to sculpt kids’ behaviors in the moment. Sometimes even save their lives.For example, how do you teach kids to stay away from the ocean, where they could easily drown? Instead of yelling, “Don’t go near the water!” Jaw says Inuit parents take a pre-emptive approach and tell kids a special story about what’s inside the water. “It’s the sea monster,” Jaw says, with a giant pouch on its back just for little kids.”If a child walks too close to the water, the monster will put you in his pouch, drag you down to the ocean and adopt you out to another family,” Jaw says.”Then we don’t need to yell at a child,” Jaw says, “because she is already getting the message.”Inuit parents have an array of stories to help children learn respectful behavior, too. For example, to get kids to listen to their parents, there is a story about ear wax, says film producer Myna Ishulutak.”My parents would check inside our ears, and if there was too much wax in there, it meant we were not listening,” she says.And parents tell their kids: If you don’t ask before taking food, long fingers could reach out and grab you, Ishulutak says.Then there’s the story of northern lights, which helps kids learn to keep their hats on in the winter.”Our parents told us that if we went out without a hat, the northern lights are going to take your head off and use it as a soccer ball,” Ishulutak says. “We used to be so scared!” she exclaims and then erupts in laughter.At first, these stories seemed to me a bit too scary for little children. And my knee-jerk reaction was to dismiss them. But my opinion flipped 180 degrees after I watched my own daughter’s response to similar tales — and after I learned more about humanity’s intricate relationship with storytelling.Oral storytelling is what’s known as a human universal. For tens of thousands of years, it has been a key way that parents teach children about values and how to behave.Modern hunter-gatherer groups use stories to teach sharing, respect for both genders and conflict avoidance, a recent study reported, after analyzing 89 different tribes. With the Agta, a hunter-gatherer population of the Philippines, good storytelling skills are prized more than hunting skills or medicinal knowledge, the study found.Today many American parents outsource their oral storytelling to screens. And in doing so, I wonder if we’re missing out on an easy — and effective — way of disciplining and changing behavior. Could small children be somehow “wired” to learn through stories?”Well, I’d say kids learn well through narrative and explanations,” says psychologist Deena Weisberg at Villanova University, who studies how small children interpret fiction. “We learn best through things that are interesting to us. And stories, by their nature, can have lots of things in them that are much more interesting in a way that bare statements don’t.”Stories with a dash of danger pull in kids like magnets, Weisberg says. And they turn a tension-ridden activity like disciplining into a playful interaction that’s — dare, I say it — fun.”Don’t discount the playfulness of storytelling,” Weisberg says. “With stories, kids get to see stuff happen that doesn’t really happen in real life. Kids think that’s fun. Adults think it’s fun, too.”Why don’t you hit me?Back up in Iqaluit, Myna Ishulutak is reminiscing about her childhood out on the land. She and her family lived in a hunting camp with about 60 other people. When she was a teenager, her family settled in a town.”I miss living on the land so much,” she says as we eat a dinner of baked Arctic char. “We lived in a sod house. And when we woke up in the morning, everything would be frozen until we lit the oil lamp.”I ask her if she’s familiar with the work of Jean Briggs. Her answer leaves me speechless.Ishulutak reaches into her purse and brings out Briggs’ second book, Inuit Morality Play, which details the life of a 3-year-old girl dubbed Chubby Maata.”This book is about me and my family,” Ishulutak says. “I am Chubby Maata.”In the early 1970s, when Ishulutak was about 3 years old, her family welcomed Briggs into their home for six months and allowed her to study the intimate details of their child’s day-to-day life.What Briggs documented is a central component to raising cool-headed kids.When a child in the camp acted in anger — hit someone or had a tantrum — there was no punishment. Instead, the parents waited for the child to calm down and then, in a peaceful moment, did something that Shakespeare would understand all too well: They put on a drama. (As the Bard once wrote, “the play’s the thing wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.”)”The idea is to give the child experiences that will lead the child to develop rational thinking,” Briggs told the CBC in 2011.In a nutshell, the parent would act out what happened when the child misbehaved, including the real-life consequences of that behavior.The parent always had a playful, fun tone. And typically the performance starts with a question, tempting the child to misbehave.For example, if the child is hitting others, the mom may start a drama by asking: “Why don’t you hit me?”Then the child has to think: “What should I do?” If the child takes the bait and hits the mom, she doesn’t scold or yell but instead acts out the consequences. “Ow, that hurts!” she might exclaim.The mom continues to emphasize the consequences by asking a follow-up question. For example: “Don’t you like me?” or “Are you a baby?” She is getting across the idea that hitting hurts people’s feelings, and “big girls” wouldn’t hit. But, again, all questions are asked with a hint of playfulness.The parent repeats the drama from time to time until the child stops hitting the mom during the dramas and the misbehavior ends.Ishulutak says these dramas teach children not to be provoked easily. “They teach you to be strong emotionally,” she says, “to not take everything so seriously or to be scared of teasing.”Psychologist Peggy Miller, at the University of Illinois, agrees: “When you’re little, you learn that people will provoke you, and these dramas teach you to think and maintain some equilibrium.”In other words, the dramas offer kids a chance to practice controlling their anger, Miller says, during times when they’re not actually angry.This practice is likely critical for children learning to control their anger. Because here’s the thing about anger: Once someone is already angry, it is not easy for that person to squelch it — even for adults.”When you try to control or change your emotions in the moment, that’s a really hard thing to do,” says Lisa Feldman Barrett, a psychologist at Northeastern University who studies how emotions work.But if you practice having a different response or a different emotion at times when you’re not angry, you’ll have a better chance of managing your anger in those hot-button moments, Feldman Barrett says.”That practice is essentially helping to rewire your brain to be able to make a different emotion [besides anger] much more easily,” she says.This emotional practice may be even more important for children, says psychologist Markham, because kids’ brains are still developing the circuitry needed for self-control.”Children have all kinds of big emotions,” she says. “They don’t have much prefrontal cortex yet. So what we do in responding to our child’s emotions shapes their brain.”Markham recommends an approach close to that used by Inuit parents. When the kid misbehaves, she suggests, wait until everyone is calm. Then in a peaceful moment, go over what happened with the child. You can simply tell them the story about what occurred or use two stuffed animals to act it out.”Those approaches develop self-control,” Markham says.Just be sure you do two things when you replay the misbehavior, she says. First, keep the child involved by asking many questions. For example, if the child has a hitting problem, you might stop midway through the puppet show and ask,”Bobby, wants to hit right now. Should he?”Second, be sure to keep it fun. Many parents overlook play as a tool for discipline, Markham says. But fantasy play offers oodles of opportunities to teach children proper behavior.”Play is their work,” Markham says. “That’s how they learn about the world and about their experiences.”Which seems to be something the Inuit have known for hundreds, perhaps even, thousands of years.Share Your TipsHow do you get your kids to do things without yelling or shouting? Or, how did your parents get you to do things without yelling or scolding? Share your advice, tips and stories, and we may include them in a story for NPR.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

A leading disabled activist has asked the head of

first_imgA leading disabled activist has asked the head of one of the country’s largest unions to take action over jobcentre staff who appear to enjoy handing out sanctions to benefit claimants.The exchange took place at a fringe meeting organised by the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union – which represents most jobcentre workers – at this week’s Labour conference in Brighton.Mark Serwotka, the union’s general secretary, was told by Paula Peters, from Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC): “There is a lot of anger with a lot of claimants around some jobcentre workers who are quite enjoying sanctioning a little bit too much.”She said these claimants wanted to know what action the union was taking to try and reduce the rate at which claimants were being sanctioned – having their benefits stopped for a period of time as a punishment for refusing to meet strict work-related conditions – and whether PCS had considered a “name and shame policy to get this stopped”.Serwotka (pictured, second from left, at the fringe) said: “I am representing some of the lowest-paid workers in Britain, some of them have been physically attacked, some of them are blamed for what they have to do.“If you are a worker and you are earning under £20,000 delivering a pretty shitty system, there is a lot of pressure on you, with the worst management I think anywhere in the public sector – they have sacked people in DWP who have cancer – so this is an organisation where it takes an awful lot of guts to stand up.”But he agreed that some members “perhaps have been or do buy into the ideology of what they are doing”.He told the fringe meeting – also attended by Labour’s shadow work and pensions secretary Debbie Abrahams – that he had visited jobcentres where it was clear from posters on the walls and “conversations people have to have with their management” that managers were trying to persuade staff that imposing sanctions was “the right thing to be doing”, in a bid to win their “hearts and minds”.Peters told Serwotka that DPAC had been blamed for intimidating PCS members who worked in jobcentres, but she said: “We don’t do that, we don’t believe in that.”And she asked him how they could bring the two factions together, following displays of anger between jobcentre staff and claimants.Serwotka appealed for “unity” between disabled activists, claimants and his members who worked in jobcentres.He said: “At the moment, our members are demoralised by the fact that they are judged by the amount of people they sanction and how many people they push through the system.”He said he knew that some jobcentre staff, as well as some people in wider society, had “fallen for the divide and rule stuff” on benefit claimants.But he said: “The best way to tackle that is for us to be as united as we can, which is why I hope we continue that.“I hope something comes of this meeting and we can take this forward.”Serwotka had earlier called for a social security system that was based on “dignity and respect” and “not one obsessing about free market economics and the private sector and conditionality”.He warned that the “political consensus” had “undermined” the welfare state over the last 30 years, and he claimed that the Tony Blair government had done as much as any to “split working people from benefit claimants”.He said the service offered to benefit claimants at jobcentres now was “a million miles away” from the one provided in 1980, when he was working for the old Department for Health and Social Security (DHSS).And he said he hoped for a debate that would lead to a social security system that staff could deliver “with some passion and pleasure”, as they had been able to when he worked for DHSS.last_img read more

ACTING Head Coach Mike Rush is playing a waiting g

first_imgACTING Head Coach Mike Rush is playing a waiting game as he awaits medical reports on four players injured over the Easter Weekend.Jon Wilkin (shoulder) came off the field on Good Friday whilst Tony Puletua (shoulder), Ade Gardner (knee) and Gary Wheeler (hamstring) didn’t finish the clash at Castleford yesterday.“TP has a scan yesterday on his shoulder and it looks serious,” he admitted. “With Ade’s knee it could be a whole host of things minor to major. We can’t tell until the swelling goes down.“Gary felt his hamstring in the game and again we won’t know until it is scanned. I feel for Wheels, he doesn’t seem to be able to get a run of games. On Monday, he single-handily created the first try and every time we made a break he was there. Hopefully, it isn’t too serious and he gets that run of games.“With Jon Wilkin, we are again waiting for results. It’s a fine line between asking players to strap up and doing long term damage. He is as brave as we have got – but we have to try and manage what is best for the long term and the player.“On the plus side though, Jonny’s finger is fine so he should be in line to return this week.”The injuries leave Rush with several choices to make ahead of this weekend’s Challenge Cup Fourth Round tie at Widnes – especially on the wing:“Tommy Makinson, Adam Swift and Jamie Foster all are in with a shout for that wing spot. A lot depends on who is playing well and fitness too. Adam has been in the 19 for the last two weeks and is benefitting from that experience. He won’t be far away on getting a shout at some point.“Since Josh Jones has come in, he’s done really well. We need to keep his feet on the floor and he needs to continue to do what he is doing. He was a powerful centre with genuine pace too. At Castleford, every time he carried the ball he looked like winning the battle on the floor.”He continued: “It wasn’t difficult to lift the lads after the Good Friday defeat because they knew they had to give one more massive effort. It’s hard when you go to Cas and have prepared to face the likes of Rangi Chase and Danny Orr. We prepared for them and perhaps it is tougher mentally when you aren’t facing that. I felt in the first 20 minutes we needed to get some points on the board and it could have been different.“But this happens over the Easter weekend. I think the RFL do have to have a look at playing Friday and Monday. Maybe you could have all the local derbies spread across the weekend on the TV? We played an intense game against Wigan and then had to dust off and ask 110kg blokes to smash into each other once again. I’m not sure that is right.“But, we built character in those final stages at Castleford and come the later rounds of Super League, the Cup or the Playoffs, we can reflect on those moments.”This Saturday’s Fourth Round match at Widnes will be Saints first taste of the Cup comp this season and the infamous iPitch.“I think all the furore over the surface has gone now and we’re looking forward to the match,” Rush said. “It will be a very tough game and we are preparing to take on the team that beat Wigan recently. The Challenge Cup is massive for us. Every overseas player comes here with the dream of doing it and it’s the same for the local boys too.”last_img read more