10 months agoWatford defender Kabasele taken to hospital after collision in Chelsea defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Watford defender Kabasele taken to hospital after collision in Chelsea defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford defender Christian Kabasele was immediately taken to hospital after colliding with a post in defeat to Chelsea.Kabasele was taken to hospital and given oxygen to numb the pain after being forced off.Despite returning to his feet momentarily, television pictures towards the end of the first half showed the former Genk man being wheeled into an ambulance on a stretcher with the aid of oxygen. With games coming thick and fast over the Christmas period, it is a blow for Watford to lose one of their key men at the back. last_img

In Photos: Everything You Need To Know About ESPN’s Dianna Russini

first_imgAn ESPN sign hanging that's very old Twitter/RussiniTwitter/RussiniIn just a few short weeks, Dianna Russini, a 32-year-old former sports anchor for NBC Washington, will be making her debut for ESPN. The news was announced back in mid-May, and Russini recently finished up her last day with her former employer. She’s expected to be an anchor for the Worldwide Leader’s SportsCenter program. How often she’ll be featured is still a mystery.Where is she from? How did she get her career started? Is she single? We’ve got all of those answers and more, along with a few photos of the rising star. In Photos: Everything You Need To Know About ESPN’s Dianna Russini >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7last_img

TORONTO MEDIA ARTS CENTRES FEUD WITH CITY ON HOLD THANKS TO USE

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: In the deep tunnel of the city’s intractable-seeming dispute with the Toronto Media Arts Centre over the group’s in-limbo space on Lisgar Street, there appeared on Wednesday an improbable glimmer of light: For those keeping score, Tuesday, June 5, was the make-or-break deadline for the city to either finally approve TMAC’s agreement of purchase and sale on the space — locked in a legal dispute since 2015 — or send them packing (in February, when the city agreed to allow TMAC interim occupancy, it specified in its terms that the sheriff would be dispatched, if necessary).Instead, something remarkable happened: In a joint statement, both the city and TMAC announced that they had extended the hard deadline with a mind, in the words of TMAC board chair Henry Faber, “to work together to ensure things will move forward as positively as possible.” Jennie Robinson Faber and Henry Faber of the Toronto Media Arts Centre are seen last year in front of contested turf: 36 Lisgar St., whose dedicated arts space they’ve gotten access to and, finally, started using. (STEVE RUSSELL / TORONTO STAR) Twittercenter_img Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

Nunavut man says triple murder done in selfdefence

first_imgAPTN National NewsChris Bishop, the man convicted of killing three people and wounding two others with a semi-automatic rifle in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, has been granted an appeal.Bishop is scheduled to appear in Nunavut court on Sept. 25.Bishop was sentenced to life in prison in 2010 for the 2007 killings. During the trial, no defence witnesses were called to the stand.Bishop’s lawyer says that the victims were trying to break into his home and that he was justified in firing 30 bullets in his own defence.The three appeal judges will determine if there is enough evidence to justify a new trial.last_img

February 18 2003 A team of new workshoppers is as

first_imgFebruary 18, 2003A team of new workshoppers is assigned to the rebar crew. [Photo & Text: sa] Construction crew members Gabriel Hendrix and Brad Bishop instruct workshoppers Chiara Voicu and Michael Ray Teslow in the art of tying rebar. [Photo & Text: sa] Michael and Chiara work on the third floor beam of the East Crescent Complex. [Photo & Text: sa] The partially finished beam. [Photo & Text: sa]last_img

New implant could restore the transmission of electrical signals in injured central

first_img Source:http://www.fetfx.eu/story/can-nanotechnology-rewire-injured-spinal-cord/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 21 2019The ByAxon project is developing a new implant that restores the transmission of electrical signals in an injured central nervous system.According to the World Health Organization, up to half a million people around the world suffer a spinal cord injury each year. Often caused by road traffic crashes, accidents or violence, the loss of motor control or paralysis significantly impacts quality of life and requires years of treatment and care. Spinal cord injury is also associated with lower rates of school enrolment and economic participation, and carries substantial individual and societal costs.Current methods for spinal cord injury treatment involve cumbersome brain-machine interfaces, with many cables linking the patient and a computer to restore limited motor functions. Other methods to map brain activity, such as magnetoencephalography, require very large machinery and particularly low-temperature working conditions.Related StoriesNovel technique that uses nanotechnology and photonics prevents bacterial infections on surgical implantsTexas A&M researchers receive grant to develop super-repellent, anti-fouling food surfacesMultifunctional nanoparticles could revolutionize treatments for complex bone diseasesTo improve the quality of life of those suffering a spinal cord injury, ByAxon – an EU project funded by the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) programme – is bringing together a consortium of researchers from across Europe (Spain, Italy, France and Germany) to devise a new generation of spinal cord treatments. The four-year project started in January 2017 and is seeking to create implants that restore sensory functions.Project Co-coordinator Dr Teresa González from IMDEA says they are focusing on recovering sensitive functions. “We want signals that start from the extremities go back to the brain. This is very important since it has been shown that therapies focused on recovering the sensitive part as soon as possible are usually more successful in recovering also the motor part.”The new nanotechnology implants called ‘nanowire-coate electrodes’ can act as a neural interface coupled with sensors able to read the magnetic signals of neurons. Special nanomaterials used in conjunction with the nanoelectrodes, such as carbon nanotubes, would also serve as a supportive framework for nerves cells, enabling them to pass signals over the spinal cord injury, effectively creating an active bypass. The nanotubes or ‘neuronal prosthetics’ could promote neuroplasticity processes and, as a final goal, contribute to the restoration of neural activity in the spinal cord.If successful, ByAxon could have a huge medical and social impact in the long term. Not only would it enable sufferers of spinal cord injuries to regain sensory functions, but the technology could also serve as a basis for a new applications. Advanced neural interfaceswith utility in retinal implants, brain-recording systems for patients with epilepsy, and deep brain stimulation devices for Parkinson disease could all benefit from the project’s research. The new sensors could be used beyond medical applications in a variety of everyday brain-machine interfaces that, for example through wireless communication, can be used to control computers, drones or robots using thought alone.last_img read more

UCL scientists discover key brain region for navigating familiar places

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 1 2019UCL scientists have discovered the key brain region for navigating well-known places, helping explain why brain damage seen in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease can cause such severe disorientation.The study, published today in Cerebral Cortex, is the first to identify the specific brain regions used in guiding navigation of familiar places.Researchers observed that a brain region long-known to be involved in new learning – the hippocampus – was involved in tracking distance to a destination in a ‘newly learned’ environment.However, when navigating a familiar place, another brain region – the retrosplenial cortex – was found to “take over” tracking the distance to the destination.Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia risk”Our findings are significant because they reveal that there are in fact two different parts of the brain that guide navigation,” says Professor Hugo Spiers (UCL Experimental Psychology), senior author on the study.”Which part gets used depends on whether you are in a place you know well or a place you only visited recently. The results help to explain why damage to the retrosplenial cortex in Alzheimer’s disease is so debilitating, and why these patients get lost even in very familiar environments.”The research team worked with students from UCL and Imperial College London. The students’ brain activity was monitored as they navigated a simulation of their own familiar campus and the other university’s campus, which was ‘newly learned’ days before.The researchers also explored the impact of Sat-Navs by having students navigate the campuses with directions overlaid on the route in front of them. Strikingly, neither the hippocampus nor retrosplenial cortex continued to track distance to the destination when using this Sat-Nav-like device.”We wondered whether navigating a very familiar place would be similar to using a Sat-Nav, seeing as you don’t need to think as much about where you’re going in a familiar place,” says Professor Spiers. “However, the results show this isn’t the case; the brain is more engaged in processing the space when you are using your memory.””This has significant implications for ongoing research into Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr Zita Patai (UCL Experimental Psychology), first author on the study. “Specifically, how the deterioration of different brain regions contributes to fundamental behaviors such as memory and navigation, and how this changes over time.” Source:https://www.ucl.ac.uk/last_img read more

S Korea police raid BMW office over car fires

first_img An official at the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency’s white collar crime unit said officers were investigating whether the company covered up vehicle defects and had confiscated documents and other materials.He declined to give further details but Yonhap news agency said a team of 30 investigators were involved. There was no immediate comment from BMW Korea. “We will conduct a thorough investigation to reveal the truth,” Yonhap quoted a police official as saying.The move came after reports more than 40 BMW vehicles have burst into flames so far this year, with some parking lots refusing to accept the cars because of fears they could catch fire.South Korea this month temporarily banned from the streets BMW cars that had not yet passed safety checks and dozens of BMW owners filed complaints seeking a criminal investigation into the firm, its local unit and their nine top officials.BMW Korea last month started recalling 106,000 vehicles with an exhaust gas recirculation module, which it says caused the recent fires. The recall applies to 42 models, all with diesel engines.The company is facing a series of legal actions over the issue in the country, and has said the problem was “not Korea specific”.In South Korea, six out of 10 imported cars are from Germany, with BMW selling nearly 39,000 in the first six months of this year, according to the Korea Automobile Importers and Distributors Association. Citation: S. Korea police raid BMW office over car fires (2018, August 30) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-korea-police-raid-bmw-office.html Explore further South Korea this month temporarily banned from the streets BMW cars that had not yet passed safety checks South Korean police raided German carmaker BMW’s Seoul headquarters Thursday in connection with dozens of engine fires.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP Criminal case filed against BMW over S. Korea car fireslast_img read more