10 months agoWatford defender Kabasele taken to hospital after collision in Chelsea defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Watford defender Kabasele taken to hospital after collision in Chelsea defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford defender Christian Kabasele was immediately taken to hospital after colliding with a post in defeat to Chelsea.Kabasele was taken to hospital and given oxygen to numb the pain after being forced off.Despite returning to his feet momentarily, television pictures towards the end of the first half showed the former Genk man being wheeled into an ambulance on a stretcher with the aid of oxygen. With games coming thick and fast over the Christmas period, it is a blow for Watford to lose one of their key men at the back. last_img

Alabama Football: Nick Saban’s Daughter Got Married At Alabama’s Bryant-Denny Stadium Last Night and It Looked Awesome

first_imgNick Saban Wedding Bryant-Denny StadiumNick Saban Wedding Bryant-Denny StadiumNick Saban’s daughter, Kristen, got married last night. We’ll give you one guess at the venue. Yes, it was Alabama’s Bryant-Denny Stadium. And it looked awesome.  Congrats to Mr and Mrs Setas #SabanToSetas #SetOnSetasA photo posted by Ann Marie Theis (@annmarietheis) on May 30, 2015 at 9:11pm PDT  The lovely bride! #setonsetas #sabantosetasA photo posted by Ann Marie Theis (@annmarietheis) on May 30, 2015 at 6:56pm PDT  #SabanToSetas #SetOnSetasA photo posted by Ann Marie Theis (@annmarietheis) on May 30, 2015 at 9:14pm PDT So Nick Saban’s daughter got married last night. Why am I not surprised at the venue!? 😉 pic.twitter.com/IPZVrETCxM— Belle Es You (@SouthernbeLLSU) May 31, 2015 RT @MarisaLeeMartin: Only Kristen #Saban could pull this off at her wedding #SabanToSetas pic.twitter.com/uUPN1zx4Pa— Brent Dougherty (@brentdougherty) May 31, 2015 All weddings of people related to college football coaches should be held at college football stadiums.last_img read more

Notable improvement in brain cancer survival among younger patients but not much

first_img Source:https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/health-news/brain-cancer-survival-has-improved-but-not-much-for-elderly Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 16 2018A new study from Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki and the Finnish Cancer Registry shows that survival after glioblastoma has improved since the millennium. The improvement in survival was, however, modest in elderly patients, raising concerns whether current treatment strategies are optimal for this patient group.Glioblastoma is the most common brain cancer, and one of the deadliest cancers known. Unfortunately, there is no cure for these rapidly progressing tumors.A randomized controlled trial in 2005 showed that a new chemotherapy (temozolomide) given at the same time with radiation therapy increased survival from 12.1 to 14.6 months in 18 to 70-year-old glioblastoma patients. Therefore, today’s glioblastoma treatment consists of surgical removal of the tumor followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, so-called chemoradiation. In many treatment centers, chemoradiation is given also to elderly (>70 years) glioblastoma patients, even though this elderly patient group was not included in the randomized controlled trial.Randomized controlled trials are often referred as “gold standard” studies for assessing treatment outcomes. However, these studies have highly selected patient population that rarely represents the “real-life” populations. For that reason, real-life studies are needed to estimate the true benefit of a new treatment in everyday practice. In a recently published nationwide Finnish study, researched explored if glioblastoma survival has truly improved after the implementation of chemoradiation treatment.”Finland has a tax-funded and government-subsidized social welfare and health care system, where socioeconomic factors and health inequalities affect much less cancer treatments and treatment outcomes than for example in U.S. Moreover, Finnish cancer treatment outcomes are shown to be among the best in the world. For these reasons, Finland is an optimal country to conduct so-called real-life cancer studies”, explains Dr. Rahul Raj, Associate Professor of Experimental Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Hospital, and one of the lead authors of the study.”We used data from the Finnish Cancer Registry, which enables evaluation of all cancer patients’ survival with high quality”, says Janne Pitkäniemi, director of statistics at the Finnish Cancer Registry.Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaStudy offers clues about how to prevent brain inflammation in Alzheimer’sThe study encompassed over 2,000 patients that had been diagnosed with glioblastoma in Finland between 2000 and 2013. The study was divided into two periods: 2000-2006 (prior to standardized chemoradiation treatment) and 2007-2013 (today’s chemoradiation treatment widely established).According to results, patients treated during the latter period had a 24% lower excess risk of mortality compared to those treated during the earlier period. Time-wise, the median survival time increased by 2.4 months in patients younger than 70 years (from 9.3 months to 11.7 months). Contrary to the randomized controlled trial in 2005, the Finnish study included also elderly (>70 years) glioblastoma patients. The median survival time increased only by 0.9 months in the elderly patient group (from 3.6 months to 4.5 months).”It is important to notice that the improvement in survival was notable in the younger patient group but only dismal in elderly patients. As the median age of glioblastoma patients is increasing at the same time than the incidence of glioblastoma is increasing, the number of elderly glioblastoma patients grows fast in the future. Today we do not have effective treatment strategies for this patient group, and it is questionable whether current heavy treatments and numerous hospital visits are always justified from patients’ perspective”, says Dr. Miikka Korja, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Hospital, and one of the lead authors.Although the prognosis for elderly glioblastoma patients has remained poor, the researchers stress the fact that there has been continuous improvement in treatments.”We think our results highlight the fact that the future glioblastoma research should more and more focus on elderly, that will soon constitute over half of all newly diagnosed glioblastomas”, Dr. Korja says. “We are very hopeful that survival rates will improve in the future.”last_img read more

New research brings scientists closer to preventing preterm births

first_img Source:https://www.utmb.edu/newsroom/article11990.aspx Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 13 2019A group of scientists led by Ramkumar Menon at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have gained new insight on a poorly-understood key player in the timing of labor and delivery. This new information brings scientists closer to being able to prevent preterm births. This study is in Scientific Reports.According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 15 million infants are born too early each year. Complications from preterm birth are the leading cause of death among children under five years old, responsible for about one million deaths each year globally. In the U.S., approximately 1 of every 10 infants was born prematurely in 2017.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTWhen a woman is at the end of her pregnancy, the normal childbirth process begins when the fetus releases chemicals signaling that his/her organs have matured enough for delivery. This chemical release shifts the mother’s hormone levels, which increases inflammation in the uterus and begins labor and delivery.”There’s another component of the biological clock that contributes to the timing of birth – a type of cell-to-cell communication between the maternal and fetal cells called paracrine signaling,” said senior author Menon, UTMB associate professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology. “Because little is known about what this type of signaling does during pregnancy, we investigated the role of paracrine signals called exosomes in the timing of labor and delivery.”The researchers collected blood plasma samples from pregnant mice and isolated the exosomes. Exosomes collected during either early or late pregnancy were injected into a separate group of pregnant mice during the human equivalent of the beginning of the third trimester.”We showed that injecting a high concentration of late pregnancy exosomes was able to cause labor-associated changes without the other hormonal and chemical triggers usually involved in this process. Injections of the early pregnancy exosomes had no effect,” said Menon. “This shows that exosomes play a more important role in labor and delivery that has never been reported before.”last_img read more

UCL scientists discover key brain region for navigating familiar places

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 1 2019UCL scientists have discovered the key brain region for navigating well-known places, helping explain why brain damage seen in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease can cause such severe disorientation.The study, published today in Cerebral Cortex, is the first to identify the specific brain regions used in guiding navigation of familiar places.Researchers observed that a brain region long-known to be involved in new learning – the hippocampus – was involved in tracking distance to a destination in a ‘newly learned’ environment.However, when navigating a familiar place, another brain region – the retrosplenial cortex – was found to “take over” tracking the distance to the destination.Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia risk”Our findings are significant because they reveal that there are in fact two different parts of the brain that guide navigation,” says Professor Hugo Spiers (UCL Experimental Psychology), senior author on the study.”Which part gets used depends on whether you are in a place you know well or a place you only visited recently. The results help to explain why damage to the retrosplenial cortex in Alzheimer’s disease is so debilitating, and why these patients get lost even in very familiar environments.”The research team worked with students from UCL and Imperial College London. The students’ brain activity was monitored as they navigated a simulation of their own familiar campus and the other university’s campus, which was ‘newly learned’ days before.The researchers also explored the impact of Sat-Navs by having students navigate the campuses with directions overlaid on the route in front of them. Strikingly, neither the hippocampus nor retrosplenial cortex continued to track distance to the destination when using this Sat-Nav-like device.”We wondered whether navigating a very familiar place would be similar to using a Sat-Nav, seeing as you don’t need to think as much about where you’re going in a familiar place,” says Professor Spiers. “However, the results show this isn’t the case; the brain is more engaged in processing the space when you are using your memory.””This has significant implications for ongoing research into Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr Zita Patai (UCL Experimental Psychology), first author on the study. “Specifically, how the deterioration of different brain regions contributes to fundamental behaviors such as memory and navigation, and how this changes over time.” Source:https://www.ucl.ac.uk/last_img read more

A magnetic method for polishing metals enables mold templates with microscale features

More information: Jiang Guo et al. Magnetic field-assisted finishing of a mold insert with curved microstructures for injection molding of microfluidic chips, Tribology International (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.triboint.2017.04.019 Explore further A fluid behaves very differently when it is confined to micrometer-scale channels. This phenomenon already has several applications such as enabling the analysis of small samples of blood.These microfluidic systems are small and portable, easy to use without expert knowledge, and disposable because they are cheap to produce. But this disposability means that microfluidic chips need to be quickly mass produced.Now, Jiang Guo and his colleagues from the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology have developed a method for fabricating molds that can quickly create microfluidic channels in polymer substrates. “The technology addresses a critical problem in mold insert fabrication for microfluidic chip production, and will enhance local industry,” says Guo.Injection molding involves shaping a material while in a molten state using a metal template. It is cheap, fast, and useful for creating microfluidic chips. However, engineering a mold with precise micrometer-scale features and smooth surfaces is challenging as burrs and tool marks create defects. A post-polishing process can fix some of these imperfections, but it is difficult for polishing tools to access the recessed corners of microstructured surfaces and remove unwanted material uniformly.Guo and his colleagues started by milling their template for a microfluidic channel 100 micrometers in depth and 100 micrometers in width on a special aluminum alloy. The channel was 100 millimeters in length and included two fluid inlets, one fluid outlet and a serpentine channel as reaction chamber. They then polished this template using a method known as magnetic field-assisted finishing. Two magnetic rollers rotating in opposite directions on either side of the mold create a magnetic field. This field controlled a magnetic abrasive made of carbonyl iron powder and alumina particles bound together by oil, which removed any unwanted material and smoothed the surface.The researchers compared their template before and after this magnetic polish. They observed that the process preserved the height of the microstructure, although the edges were more rounded after polishing. The polish reduced the roughness of the surface by a factor of four, leaving a mirror-like finish. “The next step will be to use the polished mold template for actual injection molding,” says Guo. Engineers make microfluidics modular using the popular interlocking blocks Provided by Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore Citation: A magnetic method for polishing metals enables mold templates with microscale features (2018, February 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-magnetic-method-metals-enables-mold.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A microfluidic chip injection mold. Credit: A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology Injection molding enables large-scale production of polymer and plastic materials with micrometer-sized features. Now, A*STAR scientists have developed a method for creating mold templates with high precision and few defects. read more

Sex toys all the buzz at Vegas tech show

first_imgFrom the printing press and the VCR to virtual reality sex, adult entertainment has always been a major catalyst driving innovation and reshaping technology for the benefit of the porn pioneer. And for the thousands of tech nerds at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, that means the intelligent toasters and AI vacuum cleaners are having to make room for the sex toys of the future.Among the innovations at this year’s get-together, run by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA), are an augmented strip club complete with virtual pole dancers and a “personal massager” you can operate from your smart watch.The market for sex products such as vibrators and lubricant is projected to grow to $37.2 billion globally by the year 2022, according to British sex toy retailer MysteryVibe.”It’s not strange to want a more satisfying sex life, and there’s nothing wrong with you if you need technology to help you achieve that,” the company’s co-founder Stephanie Alys told AFP.The firm was at CES to show off a product designed for the discerning gentleman—a snug, collar-like device named “Tenuto” which, in musical notation, refers to holding on slightly longer than you normally would.Meanwhile startup OhMiBod was showing off a vibrator operated via an app on Apple smart watches. The less uninhibited, or those on sufficiently noisy public transport, can simply turn it up or down by yelling at an Alexa-style voice-activated assistant. ‘Mind-blowing’Naughty America’s “Strip Club” taps into capabilities on smartphones or tablets to let people overlay virtual male or female stripper holograms on the world around them.”It’s mind-blowing,” Naughty America chief executive Andreas Hronopoulos told AFP. “You can bring a full stripper into a room, on a pole, and she is there. No tipping necessary.”Once a virtual performer is anchored in place, viewers can move around them as though the dancer were actually there. The adult film group Naughty America offered an augmented reality experience in a room tucked in the back of the CES show floor at the Las Vegas Convention Center Citation: Sex toys all the buzz at Vegas tech show (2019, January 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-sex-toys-vegas-tech.html A virtual reality option lets people use the headgear to visit faux strip joints from a first-person perspective.”I think of this more as a leisure product, where magazines are going to go—you sit back, relax, drop the holograms in place and play with them,” Hronopoulos said.The adult entertainment industry has a history of boldly pursuing new technologies that promise to improve their products or profits, taking credit for everything from e-commerce, streaming video and webcams to cable TV and subtitles. © 2019 AFP Organizers of the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show said they took back an innovation award from a sexual stimulator because there was no category for sex toyscenter_img “I think they can teach the (tech) industry a few things,” Gartner principal analyst Tuong Nguyen told AFP.Hands-freeWith the technology developing so quickly, one challenge for an industry used to marketing family-friendly gadgets is how far into the sometimes sticky world of adult entertainment it is prepared to wade. A robotic, hands-free vibrator named Ose that uses micro-robotic technology to mimic the sensation of a human mouth won a CES Innovation Award this year.But it had the honor stripped and found itself controversially banned from the exhibition floor after it was deemed to have broken the rules. It might not be clear to everyone why a nude pole-dancer is deemed more acceptable than a high-tech vibrator, but the CTA said the Ose, made by the startup Lora DiCarlo, “does not fit into any of our existing product categories” and thus should not have been eligible.”Society needs to drop the taboo around sex and sexuality—it’s a part of life and health that absolutely should be part of mainstream discourse,” Lora DiCarlo founder Lora Haddock said in an open letter to the CTA.”You never know how technology can be used, the future of healthcare might well be in the patent for a sex toy.”Douglas Layman, a general partner for the partnership backing Lora DiCarlo, said in a statement the startup was taking aim at a market that is poised to boom.”Society is changing to accept a broader discussion about sexual health, leading to explosive growth for sex tech products in the consumer market,” he said. Explore further US gadget love forecast to grow despite trust issues This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Podcasters find niche in the Arab world

first_imgRana Nawas left the corporate world nearly two years ago to produce and host a podcast—one that is now considered the most popular in the Arab world. Podcasts take growing role in shifting media landscape Rana Nawas hosts the English-language podcast ‘When Women Win’, seeking to tell the stories of successful women from around the world The English-language series, “When Women Win”, tells the stories of successful women from all over the world and, according to Apple, has become the most listened to podcast in the Middle East.It first gained traction in 2017 in Dubai, where it is produced, before it started to spread across the region.Nawas said she created the series “to give women all over the world access to role models” by highlighting the “extraordinary things” ordinary women are doing.”I’ve been surprised at how the region has embraced ‘When Women Win’,” the 40-year-old told AFP, adding aviation giant Emirates Airline would start airing her show this month.”There’s clearly a thirst for this content, there’s clearly a thirst for female role models,” said the Briton of Lebanese and Palestinian origins.”When Women Win”, which is available to download in 144 countries, is the most popular podcast even in the ultra-conservative kingdom of Saudi Arabia, according to Nawas.”I’ve been… surprised that actually my biggest market is Saudi Arabia,” said the former sales executive at an aviation company.”Everybody tells you (Saudis) only consume Arabic video content, so I was really delighted… to know that they also consume English-language audio content.”Nawas, whose show is entirely self-funded, said she hopes to be able to draw financing from other sources.”It’s not sustainable,” she told AFP.”I am hoping in a couple of years, once I have the impact that I want… to start bringing investors on or bringing advertisers or sponsors on board.”Nawas gets messages about the podcast from around the world via social media, including Instagram and LinkedIn, and believes the podcast will gain even more popularity.”I think the global future of podcasts is very positive, and the reason is people are not going to get less busy. We are only getting busier,” she said.”We need ways to consume content where it is a secondary activity.”She said most people listen to podcasts on mobile devices during their commute, or while cleaning or cooking. Explore further © 2019 AFP ‘Third-culture kids’Like Nawas, Sudanese-born Omar Tom and friends created a podcast in 2016 that touches on topics they feel are neglected in traditional media.One such issue his English-language podcast—the Dukkan Show—focuses on is life in the Gulf for members of its huge expatriate population.In the show, the hosts chat to guests as if sitting in a dukkan—or “corner store”—where it is common culture in the Arab world to socialise with friends and neighbours.”I wanted to fight a couple of stereotypes,” said Tom, 30, who is sporting a Made in Sudan T-shirt.”One was the Sudanese stereotype when I first started, which is the lack of representation in media, and if there is a representation it doesn’t always speak for the diaspora or for the third-culture kids.”As Arabs we don’t look so good in international and western media. So how do we tackle that? The only way to do that is to speak in a language that everybody would understand, which at the moment just happens to be English.”‘Here to stay’Many young Arab people now prefer podcasts over traditional radio programmes.For Rami Baassiri, 26, podcasts allow him to be more productive and do two things at once.”There’s a lot of downtime in my day, whether I’m commuting to work, driving, in the gym, in queues in the mall, at the airport, so I like to make use of that time,” he told AFP.”I think of podcasts as radio on demand.”Radio … is very random. Podcasts allow me to control the radio by choosing whoever I want to listen to, whatever I want to listen to.”Reem Hameed, a Canadian who takes part in the Dukkan Show, said podcasts are “here to stay and in the Arab world”.”We have, in the Arab world, an amazing tradition of radio. If you think about how deep radio and its history falls into the Arab world, podcasting is a natural, digital extension of that,” said Hameed, 36, who is of Iraqi and Filipino origins.Podcasts have been spreading across the Arab region, including Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait, Jordan and Lebanon.In Jordan, the platform Sowt—or “voice”—has aired an array of podcasts that touch on subjects ranging from politics to music since its launch in 2017.Hebah Fisher, chief executive and co-founder of Dubai-based network Kerning Cultures, the first venture-funded podcast company in the Middle East, said podcasts are the future.”Our seed round is a strong signal for the podcast industry in the Middle East: the medium is taken seriously, and its value for listeners and users is clear,” she told AFP in an emailed statement.”Podcasting is the future of media.” Citation: Podcasters find niche in the Arab world (2019, May 12) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-podcasters-niche-arab-world.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more