Ameren Plans Missouri’s Largest Wind Farm

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:Ameren Missouri announced plans Monday for a 400 megawatt wind farm in rural northeast Missouri, creating enough power to serve 120,000 homes within two years. St. Louis-based Ameren said its High Prairie Wind Farm near Kirksville will be the largest in the state.Ajay Arora, vice president of power operations and energy management at Ameren Missouri, called it a significant step toward Ameren’s goal of reducing carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. “What’s most important for our customers is to have a balanced energy mix,” Arora said in an interview. “That would be a combination of hydro, nuclear, natural gas, coal, wind, solar. Our portfolio has it all. And that provides the affordability and reliability that our customers expect.”Plans call for 175 450-foot-tall wind turbines on land in Adair and Schuyler counties, near the Iowa border about 200 miles north of St. Louis. Groundbreaking is expected in summer of 2019, and the turbines are expected to be operational by 2020, Arora said.Arora said northern Missouri in general is a “good wind resource.” The state’s largest current wind farm, operated by Lenexa, Kansas-based Tradewind Energy Inc., opened last year in northwest Missouri and can generate 300 megawatts of electricity, or enough to power 100,000 homes.Additional but smaller wind farms could follow. Arora said Ameren plans to spend around $1 billion by 2020 toward a goal of generating at least 700 megawatts of wind-generated energy. Ameren Missouri also plans to add 100 megawatts of solar-generated energy over the next decade, the company said.More: Ameren Plans 400-Megawatt Wind Farm, Missouri’s Largest Ameren Plans Missouri’s Largest Wind Farmlast_img read more

Early results indicate slow auction week on the Gold Coast

first_img21 Clear Water Bay Ave, Clear Island Waters 8 Constance Esplanade, Runaway Bay was passed in at $3 million.“On the day we got married, I got ready here,” Mrs Leigh-Smith said. “We were friends with the people who built the house, then 10 years later we bought it.”Almost 20 years later, Mrs Leigh-Smith has listed the property to downsize after her husband passed away and their children moved. The interior of the concrete house is spacious, with large glass panels to capture the view.Living spaces include a designer kitchen, a centrepiece staircase, a formal lounge room and a family or games room. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa19 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago44 King Charles Drive, Sovereign IslandsThe other property to crack the magic million-dollar mark under the hammer was a waterfront house at Clear Island Waters. The luxury residence boasts four bedrooms and a study, two bathrooms, and is set out on a sprawling 897m2 block with a 17m waterfrontage. 44 King Charles Drive, Sovereign Islands sold at auction.THE Gold Coast has recorded a sluggish start to the past week of auctions, with just one million-dollar property selling under the hammer, according to preliminary data.CoreLogic property data showed 40.9 per cent of 22 reported auctions over the past week were successful across the Coast. The pool overlooks a canal where dolphins have often been spotted.Outside features a pool with waterfall feature and gazebo, overlooking a private pontoon where dolphins often swim around.Nationally, CoreLogic reported auction rates have returned to ‘more normal levels’ after a slowdown around the festive period, and clearance rates are holding higher than late 2017. 21 Clear Water Bay Ave, Clear Island WatersOther properties to sell included a Broadbeach apartment for $620,000 and a seven-bedroom house at Mudgeeraba for $881,000.On the flip side of the market, a three-bedroom, three-bathroom waterfront house with 180 degree views of the Broadwater at Runaway Bay was passed in at $3 million.Vendor Mary Leigh-Smith told the Gold Coast Bulletin the house carried extra special memories. 44 King Charles Drive, Sovereign Islands A designer kitchen features in the residence. GCB Picture: 44 King Charles Drive, Sovereign IslandsIt was down from the week before, which recorded a 65.4 per cent clearance rate out of 26 reported auctions. The highest sale reported so far was at Paradise Point, where three houses went to auction. 44 King Charles Drive changed hands for $2.21 million, giving its new owners six hotel-style bedrooms to choose from, Broadwater and skyline views over 20 metres of water frontage and a sparkling pool to enjoy the vista from. last_img read more

Cureworks collaborative aims to accelerate development of immunotherapies for pediatric cancer

first_imgJun 12 2018Seattle Children’s, with participating members Children’s National Health System, BC Children’s Hospital and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has launched CureWorks, an international collaborative of leading academic children’s hospitals determined to accelerate the development of immunotherapy treatments for childhood cancer. CureWorks focuses on expanding immunotherapy trials and patient access around the world, as well as sharing data and collective expertise to advance novel cell therapies.CureWorks was founded on the idea that in order to revolutionize treatment for pediatric cancer, academic institutions must work together to achieve better treatments and outcomes for children. As the founding member, Seattle Children’s is seeing promising results in its chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy trials, and has one of the largest pipelines of open clinical trials aimed at treating pediatric blood and solid tumor cancers that do not respond to standard therapy by harnessing the immune system.Seattle Children’s strongly believes there is an opportunity to combine the strengths of multiple hospital researchers into this collaborative effort to expand the reach of pediatric immunotherapy cancer trials. CureWorks will not only increase the number of immunotherapy trial sites around the globe, it will also aim to quicken the pace of pediatric cancer discovery by diversifying and expanding the amount of data available to researchers through its scientific network.”We believe a unified effort among leading children’s hospitals is the best way to drive the discovery of new therapies for pediatric cancer,” said Dr. Mike Jensen, executive director of CureWorks and director of the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. “Our hope is that through this collaboration, we’ll be able to more quickly develop treatments with fewer side effects, better remission rates and, ultimately, enable more kids with cancer to grow up and realize their full potential.”Member hospitals will have the option to participate in clinical trials offered through CureWorks, allowing their patients access to groundbreaking cancer immunotherapies in their own community. Once these trials are open at a CureWorks member hospital site, immune cells will be collected from the patient and sent to Seattle Children’s Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility. There, the T cells will be reprogrammed to express the CAR protein, enabling them to recognize and fight cancer. The newly engineered, cancer-fighting T cells will then be shipped back to the patient’s health care team for infusion. In addition to facilitating production of immunotherapy treatments, CureWorks will also streamline the clinical trial enrollment and coordination process for members.Related StoriesMany thyroid cancer patients have no choice about radioactive iodine, study revealsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndrome”We are thrilled to be a part of this joint effort to fight childhood cancers with the latest research and cutting-edge cellular therapies,” said Dr. Catherine Bollard, MBChB, director of the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research at Children’s National Health System. “By expanding cancer immunotherapies developed at CureWorks institutions including Children’s National, we hope to increase patient access to life-saving novel therapies across the United States, while also accelerating the pace of pediatric cancer research.””The next advance for childhood cancer treatment is new immune therapies,” said Dr. Kirk Schultz, oncologist and director of the Michael Cuccione Childhood Cancer Research Program at BC Children’s Hospital and professor, Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia. “CureWorks will give children in British Columbia access to cutting edge CAR T-cell therapy for leukemia and other childhood cancers.””CAR T-cell therapy has been called the single greatest therapeutic advance in childhood leukemia in a generation,” said Dr. Alan S. Wayne, director of the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. “Through CHLA’s partnership with CureWorks, we expect to speed the development of this important new therapy to provide more effective treatment for children and young adults afflicted with many types of cancer in the U.S. and around the globe.”CureWorks members will also have access to new technology shared across the collaborative, and the ability to launch clinical trials at multiple clinical sites with support from Seattle Children’s GMP facility.In recognizing that a larger network of hospitals will help fuel discovery, CureWorks is looking for other institutions to join in the commitment to expand access to these promising cures for children. Source:http://www.seattlechildrens.org/last_img read more

Free will AI and vibrating vests investigating the science of Westworld

first_img By Matthew HutsonMay. 2, 2018 , 8:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country John P. Johnson/HBO Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) HBO’s Westworld has returned for its second season at last, complete with bloodletting, espionage, and self-aware artificial intelligence (AI). After humanlike robots at a Wild West theme park started to gain consciousness and rebelled against their human owners in the first season, David Eagleman came on as the show’s scientific adviser.Eagleman, a neuroscientist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, spoke with Science about how much we should fear such an AI uprising.This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity. On Westworld, robots can be indistinguishable from people.center_img Q: How did you get involved in the show?A: I was talking with one of the writers, and I asked who their scientific adviser was. Turns out, they didn’t have one. So that’s how I got on board. Then I went to [Los Angeles, California,] and had a long session with the producers and writers, for about 6 hours, maybe 8, about free will and the possibility of robot consciousness.I also showed them some tech that I’d invented. I gave a TED talk a few years ago on this vest with vibratory motors on it. That’s now part of the season two plot. I can’t tell you anything about it. The real vest vibrates in response to sound, for deaf people, but in Westworld it serves a different purpose, giving the wearers an important data stream.Q: What else did you talk about?A: What is special, if anything, about the human brain, and whether we might come to replicate its important features on another substrate to make a conscious robot. The answer to that of course is not known. Generally, the issue is that all Mother Nature had to work with were cells, such as neurons. But once we understand the neural code, there may be no reason that we can’t build it out of better substrates so that it’s accomplishing the same algorithms but in a much simpler way. This is one of the questions addressed this season. Here’s an analogy: We wanted to fly like birds for centuries, and so everybody started by building devices that flapped wings. But eventually we figured out the principles of flight, and that enabled us to build fixed-wing aircraft that can fly much farther and faster than birds. Possibly we’ll be able to build better brains on our modern computational substrates.Q: Has anything on the show made you think differently about intelligence?A: The show forces me to consider what level of intelligence would be required to make us believe that an android is conscious. As humans we’re very ready to anthropomorphize anything. Consider the latest episode, in which the androids at the party so easily fool the person into thinking they are humans, simply because they play the piano a certain way, or take off their glasses to wipe them, or give a funny facial expression. Once robots pass the Turing test, we’ll probably recognize that we’re just not that hard to fool.Q: Can we make androids behave like humans, but without the selfishness and violence that appears in Westworld and other works of science fiction?A: I certainly think so. I would hate to be wrong about this, but so much of human behavior has to do with evolutionary constraints. Things like competition for survival and for mating and for eating. This shapes every bit of our psychology. And so androids, not possessing that history, would certainly show up with a very different psychology. It would be more of an acting job—they wouldn’t necessarily have the same kind of emotions as us, if they had them period. And this is tied into the question of whether they would even have any consciousness—any internal experience—at all.Q: In Westworld and Blade Runner, programmers give androids vivid memories to enhance their humanness. Are such backstories necessary?A: Humans have memory so we can use our experience to avoid repeating mistakes. But memory is also what allows us to simulate the future, as studies have shown in the recent decades of neuroscience research. Memory allows us to write down these building blocks to construct our model of what happens next. One of the things that is often unappreciated about the famous amnesic patient HM, who couldn’t form new memories, is that he was also unable to simulate possible futures. If you take someone with a bad case of amnesia and you say, “I want you to picture your vacation to Hawaii next month and what it’s going to be like standing on the beach,” they’ll say, “I’m drawing a blank.” So one advantage of giving robots vivid memories, in theory, would be to steer how they put together futures.Q: Are there any moments of especially humanlike behavior in the show?A: In my book Incognito, I describe the brain as a team of rivals, by which I mean you have all these competing neural networks that want different things. If I offer you strawberry ice cream, part of your brain wants to eat it, part of your brain says, “Don’t eat it, you’ll get fat,” and so on. We’re machines built of many different voices, and this is what makes humans interesting and nuanced and complex. In the Westworld writers’ room, I pointed out that one of the [android] hosts, Maeve, in the final episode of season one, finally gets on a train to escape Westworld, and she decides she’s going back in to find her daughter. She’s torn, she’s conflicted. If the androids had a single internal voice, they’d be missing much of the emotional coloration that humans have, such as regret and uncertainty and so on. Also, it just wouldn’t be very interesting to watch them. 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