Adam Silver Is Not A Fan Of The Sixers Strategy

Hot Takedown If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS Several months ago, Hot Takedown crowdsourced ideas from listeners about how to change the draft to stop teams from tanking. After we sent him the winning idea, Silver wrote that there is a “growing consensus that we should reform the draft lottery.” But on this week’s Hot Takedown he said that after team owners voted down a proposal for change last year, the league has decided to “park the issue” for the foreseeable future.Silver argued that the marketplace is providing the biggest pressure on teams like Philadelphia, which he said are realizing that “losing comes at an enormous cost.” Silver sees a “resetting of sorts” with the team. And he denied that he intervened and asked the Sixers to install Jerry Colangelo as special advisor.Watch a video excerpt and stream the full audio of the interview above. We’ve also provided a lightly edited transcription of the highlights below. This interview was conducted Friday, Dec. 18.Silver not a fan of Sixers strategyNeil Paine: Are you personally, as the commissioner, OK with the way that the 76ers have run their franchise the past three seasons?Adam Silver: I don’t want to answer that directly. As I said, there’s a marketplace of ideas and approaches that go into managing a franchise.Am I fan of that strategy? Put it this way: No. But does that mean that it’s not acceptable under the league rules? It doesn’t. The Sixers are a mess, and Adam Silver is not happy. The NBA commissioner joined our sports podcast, Hot Takedown, for a conversation about the structure of the draft, the perverse incentives that it creates and how his office can try to “cajole” teams like the Philadelphia 76ers into being more competitive. But he admitted that ultimately, he may not be able to reset the competitive balance of the league by tweaking the draft rules. Truth to rumors that he intervened with Sixers?Chadwick Matlin: Anonymous reports suggested that [you stepped in and pushed for the hiring of Jerry Colangelo] due to owners who wanted the situation in Philadelphia changed. Are those reports correct?Adam Silver: Those reports are not correct. Josh Harris, who’s the principal owner of the 76ers, decided on his own that he needed to change course. He and I had many conversations along the way about the utility of the strategy that he was following. And he came to the conclusion once this season began, and he saw how his team was performing on the floor, that he needed to change his strategy.Other owners were not pressuring him at all. In fact, it’s a weird dynamic in the league that while all the owners would like to see teams well operated, other owners just want to win (laughter). And so nobody was calling me and saying go call the 76ers and tell them how to beat us. The Sixers are “resetting”Adam Silver: There’s a resetting of sorts going on with the 76ers right now. And I think that ultimately may speak louder in the marketplace of teams than any tinkering we do to the draft lottery.Is it time to step in and stop tanking?Chadwick Matlin: I’m interested about when you do step in as a commissioner. You’re basically the CEO of a big multibillion-dollar corporation. At what point is it your responsibility to intervene if one of your franchises is not performing in a way that represents the league?Adam Silver: Well, I would say that there’s lots of different ways of so-called “stepping in.” There’s also cajoling and ongoing conversations that I have with owners, with team presidents, with general managers, where I’m expressing my opinion. read more

Google Home app debuts color controls for smart lights

first_img Preview • For your consideration: Google Home seeks employment as your family’s Rosie the robot Aug 31 • Best smart light bulbs for 2019 (plus switches, light strips, accessories and more) Tags Aug 30 • Battling bot vacs: iRobot Roomba S9+ vs Neato Botvac D7 Connected Aug 31 • The best coffee grinders you can buy right now $69 News • Black Mirror season 5 has three new trailers to stress you out today Chris Monroe/CNET The Google Home app keeps getting more useful. Starting with version 2.9, you can use the app to change the color of compatible smart bulbs. A year ago, the app was mostly used for setting up your Google Home smart speakers. An update in the fall added well-organized smart home controls to the app that mirrored those found on Google’s smart displays. You could see all of your connected gadgets organized by room and control them with a touch. Now those touch controls are getting more robust.You’ve long been able to change the color of your compatible bulbs with a voice command to any device with Google Assistant built in, such as the Google Home Hub smart display. If you didn’t feel like talking, you had to go into the individual Philips Hue or Lifx apps to change the color of your bulbs. The newest version of the Google Home app lets you control them both from one spot.As before, you can also turn your smart lights on or off and change their brightness with the app. You can organize your lights into rooms and control them all at once. The code for the update was spotted on Monday by 9to5Google, who also noted newly added support for the upcoming Lenovo Smart Clock. The Smart Clock will offer a trimmed down version of the Lenovo Smart Display tailored for your nightstand. It’s due out this Spring. The update for the Google Home app hasn’t hit my Android phone yet, but it’s live on my coworker’s iPhone. A Google representative confirmed to CNET over email that the update officially launched Wednesday and should be live for everyone over the course of the day. Walmart Aug 31 • Alexa can tell you if someone breaks into your house See it See It 2:22 Now playing: Watch this: Google Home Review • Google Home is better than ever, but you probably shouldn’t buy it $79 0center_img Smart Home $99 reading • Google Home app debuts color controls for smart lights Crutchfield CNET Smart Home Mentioned Above Google Home See It How To • Make Google Home get your groceries See All Lenovo Smart Clock uses Google Assistant to wake you… • Post a comment Share your voice CNET Smart Home CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Google Lenovo Philipslast_img read more