Magazine founder speaks at SMC

first_imgAs part of Love Your Body Week at Saint Mary’s, Emily Raleigh, founder of the online magazine “Smart Girls Group,” shared how the magazine began and why it is important for all girls to be smart girls. Raleigh, a freshman at Fordham University, brainstormed “Smart Girls Group” one year ago when she wrote her younger sister a guide to getting through high school. The guide discussed fashion, peer pressure, classes and social life. “When I was younger, I used to dress up and say, ‘Mommy, do I look like a smart girl?’” Raleigh said. “So, when I was thinking of my sister’s Christmas present my senior year of high school, I really wanted to give her something meaningful and I decided to pull from this idea of being a smart girl. My family then really pushed me to get it published and pursue it.” After Raleigh decided to develop the concept as a magazine, she contacted girls from her community and elsewhere, she said. The group expanded from there. Today, “Smart Girls Group” is published once a month. The organization started college chapters, runs daily blogs and now has more than 150 contributors from 10 countries. “‘Smart Girls Group’ is all about connecting and inspiring girls from all over to be smart girls,” Raleigh said. “We offer a supporting environment that cultivates empowerment within girls.” She said the magazine and overall organization use blogs, articles and personal stories of high school and college women to provide girls with a healthy support network. “What is unique about our group is that all the girls who are writing or contributing to the group are high school- or college-aged,” Raleigh said. “You will not find anyone our moms’ age writing for the magazine and I think that is very important. When girls go on our website and read our magazine, they are hearing from girls going through many of the same experiences as they are.” The magazine covers an array of topics from politics to fashion to relationships, Raleigh said. It also offers advice on how to be a smart girl. She said being a smart girl starts with finding your “I am’s” and using positive language as an essential tool for breaking down barriers. “I think that being a leader and being a smart girl starts with how we speak,” Raleigh said. “When we say things like ‘I can’t,’ we are unconsciously putting up barriers for ourselves. Saying ‘I am’ and using positive language is the first step in being a smart girl.” The next step is finding your smarts, Raleigh said. “‘The Smart Girls Group’ helps you grab your passions,” Raleigh said. “We help you find things that interest you. I always had an interest in girl power and technology, and founding this group has allowed me to bridge those two passions. That is what we would like to do for our smart girls.” Raleigh said once a girl finds her passion, she should determine her goals and make plans. “Ask yourself what can I start doing today? Make sure these goals are something you can control,” Raleigh said. “You do not want to leave your destiny up to somebody else.” Raleigh stressed the importance of independent leadership and surrounding yourself with positive people. “You want to surround yourself by people that lift you up higher,” she said. “This means your friends, boyfriends, whatever. Find people that lift you up.” Raleigh encouraged those in the audience to find their own inner smart girls and set the world on fire. “Take your smarts and your passions to help change a part of the world,” she said. “There are so many ways we can all impact others’ lives in some way. Find your smart girl and set the world on fire.”last_img read more

El Salvador Ramps Up MINUSMA Air Deployment

first_imgBy Lorena Baires/Diálogo May 09, 2018 The Salvadoran Air Force (FAS, in Spanish) will ramp up its air contingent as part of the United Nations Integrated Multidimensional Stabilization Mission (MINUSMA, in French) in Mali. Units will deploy to Timbuktu, where the Salvadoran mission, under the direction of the United Nations (UN), will feature an air assistance unit on the ground and a unit of attack helicopters, as of May 2018. “The specialized combat helicopter air contingent is critical to the peacekeeping operations carried out in Mali,” Army Major General David Munguía Payés, Salvadoran Minister of Defense, told Diálogo from the Mali encampment. “Our determination to continue to support the establishment of lasting peace and security to benefit the entire population is unwavering,” he added. The minister took command of deployed elements in Mali on April 11, 2018. Upon arrival, he confirmed that two new units would come to relieve the Torogoz III helicopter air contingent, onsite since 2015. “We reiterate our commitment to contribute to the UN peacekeeping missions,” he said. Torogoz III, christened in honor of El Salvador’s national bird, which represents freedom and family unity, is composed of 90 members, including Special Forces commands, engineers, radio technicians, and military sanitation specialists from the Armed Force of El Salvador (FAES, in Spanish). The contingent works independently under the command of FAS Colonel José León Gómez. “Extremist groups’ constant attacks caused us to increase our number of operations,” Col. León told Diálogo. “The population feels calmer and such incidents dropped noticeably.” The Salvadoran pilots deployed with MINUSMA are trained in air personnel transport, convoy escort, air search and surveillance, and search and rescue of injured personnel. Additionally, they can provide civilian protection support, human rights monitoring, humanitarian assistance, and return of persons displaced by conflict. A female attack pilot Torogoz III has a distinctive feature. One of its attack pilots is a woman. Captain Sandra Hernández is the only female pilot in the FAS second helicopter air contingent. Capt. Hernández volunteered for the mission, after undergoing a battery of medical, physical, and psychological tests. She was one of the most outstanding students in the survival training classes the U.S. Army delivered in El Salvador. FAES opened its doors to women in 2000, allowing for Capt. Hernández to join as a pilot. Since then, more than 1,000 female service members serve in the various military fields. “I work with professional personnel, who respect and value the work of all, regardless of their gender. They demand the same from me as from men, and don’t discriminate against me for being a woman,” Capt. Hernández told Diálogo. “El Salvador went to great lengths to ensure that gender is not a problem for women. Women’s presence in the armed forces produces a high level of acceptance and trust in the [citizens] and I experienced this in my interaction with the population.” Capt. Hernández is in charge of monitoring Torogoz III aircraft and flight equipment, which must be in optimal conditions for missions. For example when elements conduct air reconnaissance in areas prone to terrorist attacks and escort logistics convoys deployed in cities. “Our mission is to bring security to the country with our patrols and use our aircraft to deter terrorist groups,” Capt. Hernández said. “We succeeded in greatly reducing the number of attacks. Without a doubt, this brings calm and stability to people, so that they can go to work, take their children to school, and not live holed up in their homes out of fear.” “We are proud to have her on the team, her unique empathy with the women and children of the area allows us to better interact with families,” Col. León said. “Working with colleagues with different military training, cultures, and languages adds value to the experience the [Salvadoran] contingent will gain from MINUSMA.” SOUTHCOM assistance All Salvadoran service members deployed with Torogoz III trained at the FAES Center for Peace Operations. The center was renovated in 2015, thanks to a $1.3 million donation from the Global Peace Operations Fund (GPOI), through U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) and the U.S. Embassy in El Salvador. GPOI, financed by the U.S. government, is designed to improve international capacity to carry out UN Peacekeeping Operations. Its goal is to support partner nations in increasing capacity to gain and maintain peacekeeping competency, increase the number of available service members and police units, and facilitate the preparation, logistics support, and deployment of military units.last_img read more

Mr. Pete Lowe

first_imghttp://www.haskellandmorrison.com/book-of-memories/2770581/Lowe-Pete/service-details.phphttp://www.haskellandmorrison.com/book-of-memories/2770581/Lowe-Pete/service-details.phpMr. Wilbur “Pete” Lowe, age 81, of Vevay, Indiana, entered this life on November 20, 1934, in Vevay, Indiana, the loving son of the late, Bryant and Addie Mae (Browning) Lowe. He was raised in Vevay, Indiana where he attended school. Pete was united in marriage on August 7, 1954, on Pleasant Ridge, to Carolyn Jean Scott and to this union arrived a daughter, Jerri to bless their home. Pete and Carolyn shared 62 loving years of marriage together until his death. Pete was employed as a toe puller for the US Shoe Factory in Vevay, Indiana, retiring in 1997, after 45 years of service. He was a member of the Florence Church of Christ in Florence, Indiana. Pete’s proudest family moments was the births of his grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Pete will be remembered for his love of woodworking and spending time with his family. Pete passed away at 4:15 pm, Saturday, November 12, 2016, at his residence in Vevay, Indiana.Pete will be dearly missed by his loving wife of 62 years: Carolyn Jean (Scott) Lowe of Vevay, IN; his daughter: Jerri Lowe of Titusville, FL; his grandchildren: Tracy Dickerson and his wife: Sara of Florence, IN, Erin Lynn Harsin and her husband: Jeremy of Bennington, IN and Kristen Dickerson and her husband: Lenny of Oak Hill, FL; his great-grandchildren: Bralen and Azalee Harsin of Bennington, IN, Jacob Dickerson of Florence, IN and McKayla Detloff of Oak Hill, FL; his twin sister: Wilma Hamamey and her husband: Dave of Cleveland, OH; his brother: Gayle Lowe of Largo, FL and his brother-in-law: Donald W. Allen of Vevay, IN.He was preceded in death by his parents: Bryant and Addie Mae (Browning) Lowe; his great-grandson: Joshua Detloff; his sisters: Norma Earl, Kay Risley, Thelma Jean Allen and his infant sisters: Janet Lou and Leona Lowe; his brother: Robert “Bob” Lowe; his sister-in-law: Janice Lowe and his brother-in-law: Tom Earl.Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday, November 16, 2016, at 11:00 am, by Mark Scott at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Interment will follow in the Vevay Cemetery, Vevay, Indiana.Friends may call 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm, Tuesday, November 15, 2016, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Memorial contributions may be made to the Florence Church of Christ or to Our Hospice of Southern and Central Indiana. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more