RCMP gathering DNA from men and boys in Manitoba First Nation as

first_img(The remains of Teresa Robinson, 11, were found last May. The RCMP now asking for DNA samples from boys and men in Garden Hill First Nation. APTN/file)Cara McKenna APTN National NewsRCMP investigators have taken the unusual step of requesting DNA samples from boys and men from a northern Manitoba First Nation community where the remains of an 11-year-old girl were found during a search last May, according to the band’s chief.Garden Hill First Nation Chief Arnold Flett said several RCMP officers have been knocking on doors in the community since Monday asking men aged 15 to 50 years old to allow a sample of their DNA to be taken at a local office used by the Mounties.He said the RCMP officers have told community members the request is part of the investigation into the death of Teresa Robinson, 11, whose partial remains were discovered during a search last May.Robinson’s death remains unsolved and police are treating the case as a homicide.Flett said this is one of the rare times RCMP investigators have returned to the community to gather evidence as part of the investigation into Robinson’s death over the past nine months. He said he does not know the status of the investigation.Flett said the community generally agrees with the DNA request.“We informed the community (of the DNA testing) and there’s no opposition to it,” Flett said. “It’s not forced, it’s being requested.”Flett said he hopes this will lead to a resolution for the community of about 3,000 people which continues to feel the impact of Robinson’s violent death.“We’d like to see this be solved,” said Flett. “The people of Garden Hill would like to see that happen.”He said the investigators are expected to remain in Garden Hill until Thursday gathering DNA samples.Manitoba RCMP confirmed late Wednesday that the officers were gathering DNA as part of the investigation into Robinson’s death.“The investigation into the murder of Teresa Robinson has remained an active case since our officers were first contacted and deployed to Garden Hill First Nation in the spring of 2015,” said Sgt. Bert Paquet, in an emailed statement. “While we are not in a position to discuss all the specifics of this ongoing case, we can confirm that our investigators have collected DNA samples from males of Garden Hill First Nation as one of several techniques used by officers assigned to the case.”cmckenna@aptn.ca@cara102last_img read more

STAR PREVIEW Liverpool v Leicester

first_imgThe race is on for the Premier League title and Liverpool’s encounter with Leicester could provide plenty of entertainment for neutrals tonight.Man City’s shock defeat at St James’ Park last night means Jurgen Klopp’s men have the chance to extend their advantage to seven points – although no slip ups can be afforded and they will not be taking Leicester lightly. However, this isn’t a terrible time to face the Foxes, with Claude Puel under the pump.A third successive loss at Wolves came right on the back of defeats to 10-man Southampton and an FA Cup exit to League Two Newport which has seen some fans turn on Puel, although there are no strong rumours about him leaving just yet.His side can still pack a punch, as they showed against Wolves when they went down in injury time to a Diogo Jota hat-trick in a 4-3 thriller. They were 2-0 down early on before an impressive fightback in the shape of a Demarai Gray strike and a Conor Coady own goal, before Wes Morgan looked to have stolen a point for them before Jota’s injury time winner.Remarkably on the same weekend, Liverpool were also involved in their own thriller, as their 4-3 win over Crystal Palace at Anfield kept their title charge on the road whilst also providing a throwback to the helter-skelter football that neutrals were treated to last season.Klopp’s men had to work hard to get back in front after going down to Andros Townsend’s early goal, and again when James Tomkins levelled the score with over an hour on the clock, but two goals from Mohamed Salah along with strikes from Roberto Firmino and Sadio Mane got them over the line.It will be interesting to see how they cope with the absence of James Milner – who was red carded against Palace – and this could prove to be tricky for Klopp’s men. Leicester did manage to beat Manchester City over Christmas along with Chelsea, and they have the right game-plan and firepower to frustrate bigger teams.Liverpool v Leicester CityPremier League20:00 BT Sport 1 / BT Sport 4K UHDHEAD TO HEAD RECORD(Maximum 10 matches)SEP 2018 PREMIER LEAGUE Leicester 1-2 LiverpoolDEC 2017 PREMIER LEAGUE Liverpool 2-1 LeicesterSEP 2016 PREMIER LEAGUE Leicester 2-3 LiverpoolSEP 2017 EFL CUP Leicester 2-0 LiverpoolFEB 2017 PREMIER LEAGUE Leicester 3-1 LiverpoolSEP 2016 PREMIER LEAGUE Liverpool 4-1 LeicesterFEB 2016 PREMIER LEAGUE Leicester 2-0 LiverpoolDEC 2015 PREMIER LEAGUE Liverpool 1-0 LeicesterJAN 2015 PREMIER LEAGUE Liverpool 2-2 LeicesterDEC 2014 PREMIER LEAGUE Leicester 1-3 LiverpoolJamie Vardy is always likely to be a threat on the break and with Demarai Gray and James Maddison they’ve got two plays capable of making something out of any chances they might get. Liverpool are a better balanced defensive side this season but they have not let up going forward, and this could see action at both ends.RECOMMENDED BETS (scale of 1-100 points)BACK OVER 3.5 GOALS 5 points at 5/4 with starsports.betPROFIT/LOSS SINCE JAN 1 2017: PROFIT 205.64 points(excluding Premier League ante-post)last_img read more

USC Marshall Research Finds Creative Criminals May Not Be Punished

first_img Last Updated Jul 11, 2017 by Jillian MarkowitzFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail regions: Los Angeles USC Marshall Research Finds Creative Criminals May Not Be Punished RelatedJudge Business School Research Shows How Shame Can Promote ProductivityShame, according to the famous Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, is a “soul-eating emotion” – and because some mistakes at work are inevitable, such soul-destroying shame is a common workplace occurrence. Yet newly-published research co-authored by Andreas Richter, University Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour at Cambridge Judge Business School, concludes that managers…January 23, 2015In “Featured Home”USC Marshall Welcomes 9 New FacultyFor the 2018-19 year, the USC Marshall School of Business welcomes nine new faculty members to campus. They join a growing list of over 50 who’ve taken jobs at USC Marshall over the past two years and include lecturers, assistant professors, associate professors, visiting professors, adjunct instructors, and more. When speaking about…September 25, 2018In “Featured Home”The Case for Business Curiosity from Harvard, and More – Boston NewsLet’s explore some of the most interesting stories that have emerged from Boston business schools this week. The Business Case for Curiosity – Harvard Business Review Harvard Business School Professor of Business Administration and Behavioral Scientist Francesca Gino recently published an article in the Harvard Business Review in which she…August 27, 2018In “Boston”center_img About the AuthorJillian MarkowitzView more posts by Jillian Markowitz Research from the USC Marshall School of Business may give new insight into the nuances of how people make moral judgments. The research from Scott Wiltermuth, Associate Professor of Management and Organization found that people are more likely to receive leniency if they break the rules in an original and clever way. Researchers believe that more lenient moral judgments and punishments are prompted by a respect for ingenuity.In Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Wiltermuth writes, “People view creativity as a positive, valuable trait … This perception provides creative cheaters with a halo that simultaneously makes their transferssions more palatable and more socially contagious—particularly when the transgressions appear to cause relatively little harm.” Wiltermuth also published a paper with Francesca Gino and Lynne Vincent entitled, “Creativity in Unethical Behavior Attenuates Condemnation and Breeds Social Contagion When Transgressions Seem to Create Little Harm.”One of the studies involved students who were working in groups witnessing someone in the group cheating. An actor was paid in certain groups to cheat in a creative way and to suggest that others follow suit. In other groups, the actors cheated in conventional ways. The study also included control groups in which no one cheated. This study was conducted over multiple years, and showed that those in the groups with the person who cheated in an original way were more likely to cheat in that way themselves.Wiltermuth suggested these findings could be important in situations like trials. Juries may be more likely to make an unbiased decision regarding guilt once they understand that they may be swayed toward leniency by a criminal’s creativity.Wiltermuth and Gino, a Tandon Family Professor of Business Administration at Harvard University, explained that, “Because transgressions are learned, understanding the factors that shape people’s moral judgments of others’ transgressions might also be useful in predicting which type of misdeeds are likely to become socially contagious.”last_img read more

Harvard Talks Managing Disorganized Employees and More – Boston News

first_img RelatedThe Case for Business Curiosity from Harvard, and More – Boston NewsLet’s explore some of the most interesting stories that have emerged from Boston business schools this week. The Business Case for Curiosity – Harvard Business Review Harvard Business School Professor of Business Administration and Behavioral Scientist Francesca Gino recently published an article in the Harvard Business Review in which she…August 27, 2018In “Boston”Look Out for These Boston InternshipsIf you’ve read MetroMBA’s look at how summer internships play a crucial role for MBA students, you’re probably already familiar with the many benefits of interning during your MBA career. Between forging professional connections, gaining hands-on experience, and top tier salaries, MBA students have lot to gain from seeking out…June 26, 2018In “Advice”The Twitter Echo Chamber (Sort Of), and More – Boston NewsLet’s explore some of the most interesting stories that have emerged from Boston business schools this week. Here’s Why Twitter Isn’t the Echo Chamber You Think It Is – Questrom School of Business News In new research recently published in MIS Quarterly, Northeastern Questrom’s Jesse Shore and Chrysanthos Dellarocas with…December 3, 2018In “Boston” About the AuthorJonathan PfefferJonathan Pfeffer joined the Clear Admit and MetroMBA teams in 2015 after spending several years as an arts/culture writer, editor, and radio producer. In addition to his role as contributing writer at MetroMBA and contributing editor at Clear Admit, he is co-founder and lead producer of the Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast. He holds a BA in Film/Video, Ethnomusicology, and Media Studies from Oberlin College.View more posts by Jonathan Pfeffer regions: Boston Harvard Talks Managing Disorganized Employees, and More – Boston Newscenter_img Last Updated Jan 22, 2019 by Jonathan PfefferFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail Let’s explore some of the most interesting stories that have emerged from Boston business schools this week.How to Manage Someone Who Is Totally Disorganized – Harvard Business ReviewDisorganized employees can be wellsprings of frustration, but there are ways to help them better understand how disorderly tendencies impact others.Harvard Business School‘s Rebecca Knight recently discussed strategies in HBR, addressing root behavior causes and ultimately develop better systems to manage workloads. “’Is this person’s approach creating negative outcomes, or is it just a style difference?’ If your report indicates ‘disorganized but otherwise reliable, you may have to back off.’”Rosie Perez (not the actor), Lead Financial Officer of Global Consumer Business Planning and Analytics at American Express, adds, “It takes a lot of time to change ingrained behavior, but it can be addressed. Most importantly, as leaders, it is our job to help coach our colleagues [with] constructive and pointed feedback.”You can read more about the research here.Bye-Bye Ivory Tower: Innovation Needs an Ecosystem to Thrive by Tracy Mayor – MIT Sloan Ideas Made to MatterInnovation is not exclusively indigenous to Silicon Valley. We continue to see exciting developments in London, Tel Aviv, New York, Boston, China, Nigeria, Ghana, and South Africa. However, despite the benefits of globalization, the world of innovation is not wholly flat.New MIT Sloan research has determined that there are geographic hotspots, or “innovation ecosystems,” where ideas move more easily from inception to impact.Phil Budden, a Senior Lecturer Specializing in Innovation and Entrepreneurship, notes how the traditional “triple helix” that has long driven innovation—university, government, and corporations—is now joined by two additional players: entrepreneurs and risk capital.“It’s so important to have innovation-driven entrepreneurs involved. They’re producing the companies of the future. You can’t just have today’s companies [in an ecosystem], you need to have those leaders who are going to produce future companies.”Fiona Murray, Associate Dean for Innovation, urges corporations to take advantage of startups and entrepreneurs to help experiment on their behalf.“What these startups tend to do very well is define, order, and test their assumptions through a series of what we call ‘innovation loops. So, one of the benefits of going from a purely internal research and development process to working externally is that you can really rely on the universities and startups in an ecosystem to do that experimentation for you.”You can read more about global innovation here and watch the recent discussion below.Joy Field Garners Top Award from Decision Sciences Institute by William Bole – Carroll School NewsBC Carroll School of Management Associate Professor of Operations Management Joy Field has received the highest honor bestowed by the Decision Sciences Institute (DSI), a global society of more than 1,800 scholars dedicated to fostering knowledge for better managerial decisions.Field was named the 2018 co-recipient of the Dennis E. Grawoig Distinguished Service Award, named for a founder of the 50-year-old Institute. The other recipient was Morgan Swink of Texas Christian University.DSI President Johnny Rungtusanatham of Ohio State University asserts, “This is a highly competitive distinction awarded to those who have made a continual impact on the Institute and the disciplines it serves.”Field reflected on her two decades of involvement with the Institute. “DSI has been a major contributor to all aspects of my professional development—publishing, teaching, and service—and I am delighted to have been chosen to receive this award from among the many colleagues who have also contributed so much to DSI.”Find out more about the recent award here.last_img read more