Mud Bogg this weekend

first_imgFort St. John will be getting down and dirty this weekend.The annual Fort St. John Mud Bogg is on Saturday and Sunday. The event will be taking place at the Fort St. John Rodeo Grounds and will run from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on both days.- Advertisement -Also included in the weekend festivities will be a variety of local fundraisers, such as a burger sale that will be raising money for the Baldonnel School. All the money raised from the Mud Bogg will stay within the community.  General admission costs $20 for an adult day pass and $50 for a family pass. Family passes include two adults and two children. Children under the age of 12 will receive free admission, but must be accompanied by an adult.Tickets will also be available for purchase on site (cash only).Purchase tickets in advance for a chance to win a run through the bogg with one of the trucks or a BBQ pack.    Advertisementlast_img read more

Two arrested in insurance scam probe

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinals Two women were arrested Thursday in a insurance-fraud investigation after they collected more than $2 million in benefits from policies issued on the lives of homeless men who were killed in hit-and-run crashes, authorities said. Helen Golay, 75, and Olga Rutterschmidt, 72, allegedly offered room and board to the men for as long as two years, then took out more than a dozen policies on them, according to a Police Department statement. One of them was killed in 1999, the other in 2005. “These women tend to target homeless men,” police Commander Harlan Ward said in the statement. “They offer room and board in return for the man’s signature, then open life insurance policies on the man, making themselves the beneficiaries.” Police traffic investigators discovered the alleged scam when they were looking into a fatal hit-and-run incident last year. One investigator had mentioned the case of two women who had taken out large life insurance policies on 50-year-old Kenneth McDavid when another investigator recalled working on a similar case in 1999 in which 73-year-old Paul Vados was killed. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Letterkenny Rugby U18’s support Mental Health Week

first_imgFEATURES: Letterkenny Rugby Club’s U18’s have shown their support with Jigsaw Donegal to raise awareness for Mental Health Week. The #MyWee5 campaign is a collaboration between our U18 club sponsors, Jigsaw Donegal’s Youth Advisory Panel (YAP) and Donegal Youth Council for World Mental Health week, taking place Week beginning Monday 10th October.It’s aim is to promote positive mental health by showing you some simple things you can do to help improve your mental wellbeing through the FIVE-A-DAY which are CONNECT, BE ACTIVE, TAKE NOTICE, GET INVOLVED and GIVE. Letterkenny Rugby Club U18’s team are delighted to be involved and to support the campaign.Letterkenny Rugby Club are delighted to be involved with their team sponsor and speaking on behalf of Letterkenny Rugby Club Gordon Curley, O’Gorman Cunningham Solicitors, who are also club sponsors for youth development told Donegal Daily, “We have a fantastic sponsor in Jigsaw Donegal and a great bunch of U18 lads, who are great ambassadors for our club promoting positive mental health.“Our U18’s have taken on and promoted the benefits of positive mental health through the sport of Rugby over the last number of years and are a credit to themselves.”We are asking all of Letterkenny Rugby club members, parents & families to get involved with the #MyWee5 Campaign. Letterkenny Rugby Club in association with sponsors of U18’s Team, Jisgaw Donegal and sponsors of Letterkenny Rugby Club Youth Development, O’Gorman Cunningahm & Co. Solicitors and main sponsor Kelly’s Toyota, Port Rd., Letterkenny.Letterkenny Rugby U18’s support Mental Health Week was last modified: September 21st, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:FeaturesJigsaw DonegalletterkennyMental Health WeekRUGBYSportU18slast_img read more

NAVY TO BE DRAFTED IN TO LOOK FOR MISSING TEENAGER

first_imgNAVY divers are to be drafted in in the search for missing teenager Sean McNair off the coast of Donegal.More than 150 volunteers braved stormy weather conditions yesterday for the young Derry teenager who was last seen jumping off Rathmullan Pier on Saturday morning.The 17 year old had been celebrating an 18th birthday party and a group had decided to go for a late night swim. Since then his family and friends, including his mother Jackie, have kept a vigil at the small seaside village.Today’s search was confined to the shoreline as storms stopped boats from putting out to sea.The searches, under the guidance of the Greencastle Coast Guard and the Mulroy Coast Guard, stretched for miles along both sides of Lough Swilly.The Siorsky search and rescue helicopter from Sligo did manage to take part in the operation for a small window of time during the afternoon. Irish Coastguard spokesman Derek Flanagan revealed a meeting of all search and rescue teams is to take place tonight in the hope of better weather tomorrow.“We are hoping for better weather and a concentrated effort can then me made to resolve the situation.“We are also hopeful of receiving assistance from navy divers,” he said.He appealed to anybody considering taking part in the huge search to make sure they were the proper clothing and to inform people of where they are searching.Meanwhile local priest Fr Martin Collum has paid tribute to the search and rescue teams who are hoping to find Sean. “It was an eye opener for me to see all the voluntary services there working away.“I was fortunate enough to sit in on one of their briefing and to see their professionalism was wonderful and a real inspiration.“We take these people for granted and we never appreciate what they do and the family really appreciate what they are doing for them. Their work in trying to find Sean has been absolutely fantastic,” he said.Ends NAVY TO BE DRAFTED IN TO LOOK FOR MISSING TEENAGER was last modified: July 18th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

DONEGALDAILYTV: VIDEO OF STUDENTS MARCHING THROUGH LETTERKENNY IN CUTS PROTEST

first_imgDDTV: STUDENTS staged a noisy march through the centre of Letterkenny today, protesting at cuts in education. Students handed in a thousand letters of protest to TD Joe McHugh’s offices on the main street.Aidan O’Gallachoir claimed some students were being forced to live in their cars because they can’t afford rents.Our earlier report is here:LYIT STUDENTS MARCH AGAINST PROPOSED CUTS Click play on the video to watch the student march. DONEGALDAILYTV: VIDEO OF STUDENTS MARCHING THROUGH LETTERKENNY IN CUTS PROTEST was last modified: November 28th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DONEGALDAILYTV: VIDEO OF STUDENTS MARCHING THROUGH LETTERKENNY IN CUTS PROTESTlast_img read more

J&J, BSC joust to buy Guidant

first_img Defibrillators – stopwatch-size devices that help detect and electrically correct dangerous irregularities in heart rhythm – became commonly used starting in the mid-1990s. They are becoming increasingly sophisticated and smaller, allowing for less-invasive surgery that does not involve cracking the chest open to implant the device near the heart. Pacemakers, which emerged in the 1960s, use a mild electrical current to speed a slow heartbeat. The cardiac rhythm market is expanding with the growing number of older people. “People are living longer now, and with defibrillators they’re remaining alive whether they’ve had a heart attack or have an irregular heartbeat,” said Dr. Samin Sharma, a cardiologist at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York. The market also is increasingly lucrative because insurance coverage for defibrillators is no longer limited to heart attack survivors. The Medicare program in January agreed to expand coverage because of a government-funded survey that showed the technology significantly reduced deaths in patients with even mild heart disease, which also led to expanded coverage by private insurers. The findings indicated that the devices could save lives in people at risk of potentially fatal heart fluttering, called ventricular fibrillation. Recent research also demonstrates benefits for those with weak hearts who receive newer defibrillators that resynchronize the heart’s pumping action for greater efficiency. “Now, the devices can make you feel better every day, and also protect your life,” Maisel said. But at a time of rising health care costs, the devices aren’t cheap. Excluding surgical and other expenses, defibrillators can cost more than $25,000, and pacemakers more than $5,000. Cost isn’t the only problem. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in September that an agency-sponsored study found about 20 of every 1,000 defibrillators malfunctioning, leading to 31 deaths from 1990 to 2002. While the deaths represented only a fraction of the more than 400,000 defibrillators implanted in those years, it was enough to prompt the FDA to say it needs to improve regulation of the devices. “The devices are complicated, and they’re not perfect,” Maisel said. “But the chance that it will save your life is about 1,000 times greater than the chance of it failing when you need it.” Guidant’s product troubles have received more attention than its rivals’ because of multiple recalls and warnings this year involving its devices. The problems led New Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J to persuade Guidant last month to accept a bid about $4 billion less than it offered a year ago. In announcing their bid for Guidant on Monday, officials with Natick, Mass.-based Boston Scientific cited strong growth prospects in a market they called “under-penetrated,” with room for more competition. “It’s clear the market for implantable defibrillators is far from saturated,” Maisel said. “There has been exponential growth for a number of years, and there’s every reason to believe it will continue.” While pacemakers have posted only modest growth in recent years, sales of implantable defibrillators rose 24 percent last year, with expectations for 20 percent increases the next two years, according to Natexis Bleichroeder. Three American companies dominate the global market: industry leader Medtronic Inc. of Fridley, Minn.; Indianapolis-based Guidant; and St. Jude Medical Inc. of Little Canada, Minn. Boston Scientific and J&J are already strong in markets such as drug-coated heart stents. But cardiac rhythm is a field that’s difficult to enter because of the years it takes to bring a product to market, and the technical support device makers must offer doctors. “It’s hard for another company to just come in and start making defibrillators and succeed,” Maisel said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BOSTON – Johnson & Johnson and Boston Scientific Corp. are dueling to pay more than $20 billion to buy Guidant Corp., a medical device maker struggling to repair its reputation amid product recalls and liability lawsuits. The reason? J&J and Boston Scientific both want Guidant’s piece of the hot $9 billion-a-year market for implantable heart defibrillators and pacemakers. Boston Scientific raised the stakes Monday with a surprise $25 billion bid to counter J&J’s lower offer. Despite product recalls and high failure rates, the cardiac rhythm market is booming because recent studies indicate defibrillators could help far more people than previously thought. The findings have led to expanded insurance coverage. And it doesn’t hurt that the devices are getting smaller and more effective, or that the population is aging. The technology’s life-saving potential counts most for Diana Enders, a 33-year-old accountant from Melrose Park, Ill. Enders had a pacemaker implanted in June after she suffered a heart attack during an after-dinner walk with her boyfriend. Tests revealed a cardiac disorder that had gone undetected. Enders, who used to work out four times a week, is slowly recovering, taking walks and doing sit-ups. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals “I try to live a normal life,” Enders said. “I have to slow down, and I can’t just get up and run like I used to. It’s a period of adjustment. But I’m going to live a long life.” Sales of implantable defibrillators and pacemakers will hit $9.3 billion this year and $10.4 billion in 2006, up from $5 billion in 2001, according to a forecast by brokerage Natexis Bleichroeder. Use of implantable defibrillators has grown from about 21,000 in 1995 to between 250,000 and 300,000 this year, according to the Heart Rhythm Society, a nonprofit group of cardiac care specialists. “I think everyone who was in this field has recognized the importance of this therapy, and realized that it was just a matter of time before it would take off,” said Dr. William Maisel, a cardiologist at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center who consults with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on cardiac devices. About 450,000 people die in the United States each year from sudden cardiac arrest, with 5 million suffering some degree of heart failure. last_img read more

Americans likely to face stubbornly high energy prices in 2006

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) – Terry Grandchamp’s Virginia home-remodeling business is booked through spring and he’s planning to bump up his prices to help cover the high cost of gasoline and building materials. But when it comes to his own finances there is no passing the buck, so Grandchamp is doing his best to conserve fuel at home and on the road. Chemical maker Tomah3 Products Inc. of Wisconsin is somewhat less confident customers will continue to absorb the soaring price of natural gas in 2006. That’s forced company president Steve King to shrink his work force through attrition and hire a commodity broker to manage his fuel purchases. At North Carolina-based Family Dollar Stores Inc., the biggest worry these days is that the already tight budgets of low-income shoppers will be nearly busted by the expected surge in home-heating costs this winter. The company aims to stabilize itself by selling fewer discretionary goods and more essentials such as food and health products. Such is life for consumers and companies grappling with the prospect that today’s high energy prices may stick around for a while. Crude-oil prices, while sharply below the 2005 peak of almost $71 a barrel in August, are expected to average more than $55 a barrel through the end of next year and potentially longer than that. That is more than two-and-a-half times the $19.70 a barrel that crude-oil futures averaged during the 1990s, and about 60 percent more than the average price since 2000. It’s probably not enough to cripple the economy in 2006, but stubbornly high prices for oil and natural gas could stunt growth and increase inflationary pressures for the second year in a row. With supplies still relatively tight, there is always the risk of a more severe energy-related economic shock if there were a major disruption like the most recent hurricane season. Economists say the more likely scenario is that Americans will begin to breathe a little easier by the second half of the year. That’s because they will have already absorbed much of the pain of a multiyear run-up in prices and will benefit from stable, if not falling, energy costs. From airlines to manufacturers to retailers, “we’re seeing a lot of emphasis on conservation in business,” said Stephen P. Brown, an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas. Companies that weren’t already making changes before hurricanes Katrina and Rita are doing so now because they saw how tight supplies are and how easily a disruption could push up prices, he said. At the consumer level, Brown sees the discounting of SUVs and the premiums auto dealers are charging for gas-electric hybrids as the early signs of a slow but significant change. “These things take time,” he said. “Quite often, people mistake the amount of time it takes to adjust to prices as evidence of society not responding.” Grandchamp, who lives in Annandale, Va., said he hopes at some point to own a hybrid vehicle, but for now he and his wife simply try to drive their gas-guzzling van and SUV less – a change in behavior that he says is permanent. “I don’t believe in just wasting money,” said the 55-year-old Grandchamp, who coordinates errand-related driving with his wife and has asked his kids to take the bus home from school. Similarly, Tomah3 Products, which manufactures chemicals used in industrial cleaning fluids, has grudgingly adjusted to the high price of energy. Natural gas, which the company uses to heat its boilers, is about twice as expensive as last year, while the cost of the petrochemicals Tomah3 uses as raw materials is up by about 50 percent. Company president King said he’s increased the price of his finished products more than a dozen times since the summer of 2004, but that it hasn’t fully offset the jump in expenses. King has tried to make up the difference at factories in Milton, Wis., and Reserve, La., by operating with 5 percent fewer workers, but profit growth is lagging. “I’ve assimilated the hit,” King said. “I’ve passed along most of what I can and now I’m prepared to live with it. But in my opinion, prices will come down.” That would be welcome news for Family Dollar Stores of Matthew, N.C., which saw its profits erode in 2005. Its main customers are people who earn less than $25,000 a year and therefore most vulnerable to rising energy prices. With its clientele spending less on clothing and other discretionary goods, Family Dollar intends to boost sales by stocking its stores with more essential goods, such as milk, bread, cleaners and health products. But even that strategy may have its limits. Experts say when utility bills soar this winter, many poor families may decide to cut spending on clothing, health care and food in order to keep their homes warm. “This winter will be a catastrophe,” said Skip Arnold, executive director of Energy Outreach Colorado, a nonprofit that helps the poor pay their utility bills. “The overall economy is a little better than it was two years ago, but that doesn’t seem to have benefited our most vulnerable households.” Oil prices are forecast to average $58 a barrel in 2006. While that is up slightly from $57 a barrel in 2005, the good news, according to several economists, is that prices are expected to fall in the back half of 2006. Increased energy prices and interest rates are expected to dent consumer spending in 2006 and that is why economists are calling for U.S. economic growth of about 3.3 percent in 2006, down from 3.5 percent in 2005. But they also say lower consumer and corporate spending should help offset energy prices’ effect on inflation. Economist Nariman Behravesh of Global Insight said core inflation could climb as high as 2.5 percent in the first half of 2006 as 2005’s energy prices trickle through the economy. But price pressures will ease by the second half of 2006 as oil and natural gas costs make a post-winter retreat and the Federal Reserve continues to gradually raise interest rates. “That will cool down the housing market,” Behravesh said. “And if your home price isn’t rising, you’ll be less likely to take a home equity loan for a car or some other big purchase.” The rising rates will also make it more expensive to take on credit card debt and that could further dampen spending by consumers who are already tapped out, economists said. “I’m actually encouraged by how well the economy hung in there in September and October during the worst of the energy price spikes,” said economist Douglas Porter of BMO Nesbitt Burns. “The bigger threat to growth is the rising interest rates.” Analysts believe that the cost of oil, natural gas, gasoline, diesel and other fuels will remain high by historical standards – as will the risk of shortages. The smaller-than-usual spread between the global demand for energy and the industry’s capacity to produce it leaves a thin margin for error, so that the impact of any output disruptions is magnified. The fear of such events – sabotage to Iraqi oil pipelines, hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, etc. – is enough to keep upward pressure on prices. Oil prices peaked in the U.S. in 2005 at $70.85 in late August, average retail gasoline prices crested at $3.07 a gallon in early September and diesel prices hit a high of $3.17 in late October. “Unfortunately, 2006 is a year where those records are still possibly threatened,” said analyst Tom Kloza of Wall, N.J.-based Oil Price Information Service. Perhaps no other industry has been clobbered as badly by high fuel prices in recent years as the U.S. airlines. Taking cues from budget carriers Southwest Airlines Co. and JetBlue Airways Corp., the rest of the industry has been aggressive about cutting costs but has had difficulty raising fares to profitable levels. Delta Air Lines Inc. and Northwest Airlines Corp. were not up to the challenge and filed for bankruptcy in 2005, but other carriers have become much more efficient as a result of the soaring oil prices and they are cautiously optimistic about 2006. “In that sense, it has been rewarding in a sick way,” said Paul Tate, the chief financial officer of Denver-based Frontier Airlines, which earned $6.9 million in the July-September quarter. “We’re leaner and meaner with oil at $55 a barrel coming off the peak than we were going up to $55 the first time.” Brian Jennings, the chief financial officer of Oklahoma City-based oil and gas producer Devon Energy Corp., said he does not believe oil prices will ever revert to the 1990s average of $20 a barrel again because producers are struggling to keep up with demand growth and production costs are higher. However, Jennings also believes that conservation will gradually have an impact on the market. “The U.S. consumer is underestimating the impact it can have on global energy prices,” said Jennings, who has been driving the same Mercury Capri since 1982 and who boasts of the energy efficient windows he recently installed at home. But if conservation falls by the wayside – if there is a resurgence in SUV sales as gasoline prices drop – Jennings believes “this economy will remain subject to economic shocks driven by energy.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Brave Dominique speaks out on the Late Late Show

first_imgRape survivor Dominique Meehan from Letterkenny joined the Late Late Show last night to raise awareness of the lasting impact of sexual assault. Dominique (26) recalled the horrific details of her rape in 2015, for which Keith Hearne, from Tallaght in Dublin, was charged and sentenced to 12 years in prison.Dominique told Ryan Tubridy how she feared she would die in the horrific attack three years ago at that gaming convention in Dublin. “I could have been on the obituaries on my local radio station,” Dominique said. She revealed the terrifying threats Aherne made to silence her during the rape and she recalled the moment her friend burst into the room to save her life. Dominique received a round of applause for her brave words of advice for any person who has ever been attacked:“It is not your fault,” she said. “If someone rapes you, that is completely on them. Whether you were drinking, no matter what you were wearing, it’s on them.”The young Donegal woman spoke out about her ordeal alongside Debbie Cole, a Dublin woman who was raped at the age of 19. Debbie is leading a campaign for longer sentences for repeat offenders. Her relentless determination has led to a successful outcome this week, as ‘Debbie’s Law’ went to the judicial committee this morning and will be presented to the Dail in the coming weeks.The full interview is available now on the RTE Player: https://www.rte.ie/player/ie/show/the-late-late-show-extras-30003017/10874712/Brave Dominique speaks out on the Late Late Show was last modified: May 5th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Dominique Meehanrape awarenesssexual assaultThe Late Late Showlast_img read more

Coliseum officials met with Raiders over stadium lease

first_imgOAKLAND — The Raiders resumed talks with East Bay officials in efforts to reach an agreement to play the 2019 season at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum.Coliseum Stadium Authority executive director Scott McKibben acknowledged Tuesday that he had met with Raiders executives for a few hours, a reversal of what he told this news organization a day earlier.“The meeting was productive and meaningful,” said McKibben, adding it took place for a few hours Friday. “Our deal is still on the table …last_img

Photos: The scoreboard at the Golden State Warriors’ Chase center is as big as a house

first_imgClick here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device.Led by Golden State Warriors CEO and President Rick Welts, Bay Area media on Monday toured the mostly finished Chase Center, where the Warriors will tip off their new season with a preseason game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Oct. 5.The massive scoreboard — said to be the largest, by a considerable margin, in the NBA. The Chase scoreboard, developed by Samsung, is more than 9,699 square feet of screen space. The …last_img