Corby Hall to be demolished in June, rebuilt

first_imgCorby Hall, a priest’s residence hall and one of the oldest buildings on campus, will be demolished this summer and rebuilt, The South Bend Tribune reported Wednesday.Built in the late 19th century, Corby Hall is property of the Congregation of the Holy Cross and does not belong to Notre Dame. However, the University and the religious order decided together to replace the building, the report said.“We originally planned to renovate the old building and put an addition on,” Rev. Austin Collins, the religious superior of the Corby Hall community, said to The South Bend Tribune. “It just was not feasible.”University spokesman Dennis Brown said the structure of the building made renovation not possible.“The load-bearing walls in the current structure were such that we couldn’t effectively renovate the building,” he said to The South Bend Tribune.The report said, the building has been home to several “famous residents,” including University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh and former football coach Knute Rockne.The new Corby Hall will feature a “similar design” to the old building and is expected to be completed in spring of 2020. Until the hall is completed, the 28 current residents will live elsewhere on campus.The new building will be constructed with $20 million from Mary and Jay Flaherty’s gift to the University and Congregation of the Holy Cross last year as well as $10 million from Notre Dame, the report said.Tags: Congregation of the Holy Cross, Corby Halllast_img read more

Hedwig, Starring Neil Patrick Harris, Recoups on Broadway

first_img Star Files Related Shows Hedwig and the Angry Inch The cast also includes Tony winner Lena Hall as Yitzhak. Harris departs the show on August 17; Tony nominee Andrew Rannells will step into his high heels August 20 through October 12. As part of an ongoing partnership, the production has also donated $100,000 to the Hetrick-Martin Institute, the nation’s oldest and largest organization helping gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth to reach their full potential. Directed by Michael Mayer, Hedwig and the Angry Inch tells the story of a fictional rock ‘n’ roll band, fronted by Hedwig (Harris), a transgender woman from communist East Berlin. Between rock songs, Hedwig regales the audience with both humorous and painful stories about her life, including her botched sex change operation. The score includes “Tear Me Down,” “Wig in a Box,” “Wicked Little Town,” “The Origin of Love,” “Angry Inch” and more. Lena Hallcenter_img Andrew Rannells The Tony-winning revival of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, which stars Tony winner Neil Patrick Harris, has recouped its initial capitalization. John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s rock musical, which only performs seven instead of the usual eight Broadway shows per week, has set the box office record at the Belasco Theatre four times. Neil Patrick Harris View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015last_img read more

Another first for Australian renewables, clean generation tops brown coal during third quarter

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The combined output of wind and solar generation has beaten brown coal for the first time over a quarterly period in Australia’s main grid, according to new data from energy consultancy Energy Synapse.Wind and solar have beaten brown coal over weekly and monthly periods in recent times, but not previously over a whole quarter.“July to September 2019 was the first quarter ever where wind and solar (utility-scale plus rooftop) in the National Electricity Market generated more electricity than brown coal,” says Energy Synapse managing director Marija Petkovic. “This is a significant tipping point in the transition to clean energy.”According to the Energy Synapse data, utility-scale solar set a new record for electricity generation in the third quarter, despite the fact that it is not usually the best period for sunshine. The output for the last three months from utility scale solar generation was 1,300GWh – almost three times the generation in the same time last year, which reflected the growth from newly connected solar farms in Queensland such as the Clermont, Haughton, and Rugby Run installations, and despite the fact that many facilities were turned off on occasions due to negative pricing.Petkovic says wind power also set a new record for the highest ever electricity generation in the third quarter, in this case driven by new capacity coming online, particularly in Victoria, which now trails the long-term leader of wind generation – South Australia – by just two per cent.There have also been outages at units of the Loy Yang A and Yallourn, which have contributed to the dip in electricity generation from brown coal. But Petkovic pointed out that the electricity generated from variable renewables in the July-September quarter was higher than that of brown coal in any of the last five quarters.More: Wind and solar output beat brown coal in Australia for first time in September quarter Another first for Australian renewables, clean generation tops brown coal during third quarterlast_img read more

Hempstead Attempted Murder Suspect Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police released a photo of a man they said is a suspect who is wanted for the attempted murder of a stabbing victim in Hempstead six months ago, authorities said.The suspect, Jose or Luis Alberto Sorto, allegedly stabbed the victim several times on Washington Street near the corner of Vancott Avenue at 6:40 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6, police said Tuesday.Third Squad detectives released the photo of the suspect—who’s last known address was on Hendrickson Avenue in Hempstead—in the hopes that someone would recognize him and turn him in.Police said that another suspect has already been arrested in connection with the stabbing, but did not release the alleged codefendant’s identity.Crime Stoppers is asking anyone who has any information about the whereabouts of Jose or Luis Alberto Sorto, or anyone with any information about this case to call their toll free hotline: 1-800-244-TIPS (8477). All callers will remain confidential.last_img read more

Just a friendly reminder that bribery is still illegal

first_img 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit union bribery is illegal.Perhaps this is news to no one, but I was reminded of this recently when asked by a NAFCU-member whether a credit union employee could accept a monetary gift of thanks from a member.  While gifts of appreciation and other gratuities from members to credit union employees are, in most cases, innocent and well-intentioned, an employee’s receipt of such gifts can raise bribery concerns.Code of ConductNCUA has an old, but still effective, Interpretive Ruling and Policy Statement (IRPS) from 1987 (See, IRPS 87-1) that provides guidance to federally insured credit unions with respect to the Bank Bribery Act. See, 18 U.S.C. §215.  Among other things, IRPS 87-1 “encourages federally-insured credit unions to adopt codes of conduct that describe the prohibitions of the bank bribery law” and recommends procedures to ensure compliance with the law.By way of brief background, the Bank Bribery Act generally prohibits a credit union “officer, director, employee, agent, or attorney ” from seeking or accepting anything of value, with the corrupt intent to be influenced or rewarded in connection with any business or transaction of the credit union. The law also prohibits anyone from offering or giving anything of value to a credit union officer, director, employee, agent, or attorney in connection with any business or transaction of the credit union, with the intent to corruptly influence or reward that person. continue reading »last_img read more

CDC’s Cox honored as top federal employee

first_imgSep 28, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Influenza expert Nancy Cox, PhD, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was named federal employee of the year yesterday by a nonprofit group.Cox, 58, director of the CDC’s Influenza Division, received the award in Washington, DC, from the Partnership for Public Service, a nongovernmental organization that promotes excellence in government employees. She was honored for her work to help the United States and the world prepare for an influenza pandemic, according to a CDC news release yesterday.”Nancy Cox embodies the best of what CDC is about—world-class scientists serving on the front lines each and every day to protect America’s health,” said CDC Director Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, in the CDC release. “Her dedication and leadership of CDC’s influenza activities are truly making a difference in the country’s fight against seasonal influenza as well as in the world’s preparation for the next influenza pandemic.””I’m very honored to receive this award,” Cox said in the CDC release. “I feel like it’s a reflection of the excellent work done by many, many people who’ve worked on influenza at CDC—both in the past and present—and have helped build our influenza program into what it is today.”An Iowa native, Cox received a bachelor’s degree in bacteriology from Iowa State University and a doctorate in virology from the University of Cambridge, England. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, before joining the CDC in 1975.Cox assumed leadership of the CDC’s 14-person influenza group in 1992. The division now comprises more than 100 staff members.Under Cox’s direction, the Influenza Division monitors for new influenza strains or outbreaks that could signal a pandemic, assists countries around the globe in investigating flu outbreaks, recommends strains for the seasonal flu vaccine, and conducts a variety of influenza virus studies, according to the CDC news release.Cox has received numerous scientific and achievement awards, the CDC said. In addition, she was recognized by Time magazine as one of 2006’s 100 most influential people and by Newsweek as one of the “15 People Who Make America Great.”See also:Sep 27 CDC news releasehttp://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/r060928.htmlast_img read more

Chelsfield fails to attract bidders

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Ireland to ease travel restrictions with some countries from July 9

first_imgIreland plans to lift from July 9 a 14-day quarantine for people arriving from countries that have also suppressed the coronavirus, acting prime minister Leo Varadkar said on Thursday.Ireland will produce a “green list” of countries where the 14-day quarantine will not apply by the July 9 resumption date, Varadkar told a news conference, approving Ireland’s move to the third of the four-phase plan for reopening its economy.Varadkar said the list of countries and criteria for so-called “air bridges” would be coordinated at an EU-level but also cautioned prospective holiday-makers that the list would be reviewed and may change every two weeks. Topics : Ireland has reported an average of nine coronavirus cases a day for the past seven days, representing the biggest drop in new cases across the European Union over the last two weeks, Health Minister Simon Harris said.So far, 1,727 people have died in Ireland from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.Asked if the quarantine measures would remain in place with Britain, Varakdar said that while the incidence of the disease seemed to be going in the right direction there, its larger neighbor would not currently meet the criteria.”That’s going to depend on the numbers but at the moment the incidence is very high in Great Britain, so if it was today, we would not be removing the 14-day requirement. We’ll see where we stand on July 9,” he said.Varadkar made clear that the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland would remain open as it has been throughout the pandemic. last_img read more

WHO says reviewing NYT article on concerns over airborne spread of COVID-19

first_imgThe World Health Organization (WHO) is reviewing a report that suggested its advice on the novel coronavirus needs updating, after some scientists told the New York Times there was evidence the virus could be spread by tiny particles in the air.The WHO says the COVID-19 disease spreads primarily through small droplets, which are expelled from the nose and mouth when an infected person breaths them out in coughs, sneezes, speech or laughter and quickly sink to the ground.In an open letter to the Geneva-based agency, 239 scientists in 32 countries outlined the evidence they say shows that smaller exhaled particles can infect people who inhale them, the newspaper said on Saturday. “Especially in the last couple of months, we have been stating several times that we consider airborne transmission as possible but certainly not supported by solid or even clear evidence,” Benedetta Allegranzi, the WHO’s technical lead for infection prevention and control, was quoted as saying in the New York Times.WHO guidance to health workers, dated June 29, says that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is primarily transmitted between people through respiratory droplets and on surfaces.But airborne transmission via smaller particles is possible in some circumstances, such as when performing intubation and aerosol generating procedures, it says.Medical workers performing such procedures should wear heavy duty N95 respiratory masks and other protective equipment in an adequately ventilated room, the WHO says.Officials at South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control said on Monday they were continuing to discuss various issues about COVID-19, including the possible airborne transmission. They said more investigations and evidence were needed. Because those smaller particles can linger in the air longer, the scientists – who plan to publish their findings in a scientific journal this week – are urging WHO to update its guidance, the Times said.”We are aware of the article and are reviewing its contents with our technical experts,” WHO spokesman Tarik Jasarevic said in an email reply on Monday to a Reuters request for comment.The extent to which the coronavirus can be spread by the so-called airborne or aerosol route – as opposed to by larger droplets in coughs and sneezes – remains disputed.Any change in the WHO’s assessment of risk of transmission could affect its current advice on keeping 1-metre physical distancing. Governments, which also rely on the agency for guidance policy, may also have to adjust public health measures aimed at curbing the spread of the virus.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Police have dispersed more than 4 million gatherings nationwide since March

first_imgIn an edict issued by Idham on March 19, the police urged the public to refrain from organizing gatherings in public places or on private property, including social meetings, workshops, music festivals, sporting events, mass protests and family receptions. Since the edict came into force, police officers have been dispersing gatherings and crowds during patrols throughout the country.One of the latest operations occurred on Monday when the police dispersed an event organized by the Save Indonesia Coalition (KAMI) in Surabaya, East Java, because a large crowd had formed. Former TNI commander Gatot Nurmantyo, a member of the organization’s presidium, had planned to give a speech at the event.Idham added that the police had investigated other cases related to the pandemic, namely 104 cases of alleged fake news, 36 cases of food hoarding and 18 cases of medical equipment hoarding.”Since March, we’ve conducted preemptive and preventive measures against hoaxes. We’ve conducted 23,830,650 cyber patrols,” he added.Topics : The police have dispersed more than 4 million gatherings nationwide since authorities first instated bans on public gatherings in March in an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19.“We’ve dispersed 4,091,339 public activities,” National Police chief Gen. Idham Azis said during a hearing with House of Representatives Commission III overseeing legal affairs on Wednesday.”The police have continued to patrol in areas prone to the spread of the coronavirus, but we pay attention to human rights principles.”last_img read more