20 frontline charities win 2021 Weston Charity Awards

first_img20 frontline charities win 2021 Weston Charity Awards Philippa Charles, Director of the Garfield Weston Foundation said: Between them, the winners provide services to over 72,000 people and range in size from £100,000 to £2.5 million annual income. The charities support families experiencing domestic violence, people with physical impairment and homeless people among other causes. A majority have been hit financially by the Covid-19 pandemic. Ed Mayo, Chief Executive of Pilotlight said: After a year in which all Pilotlight programmes have been delivered digitally, this will be the first cohort of Weston Charity Award winners to embark upon a new blended model that includes a series of virtual coaching sessions over ten months with a hand-picked team of senior business and charity leaders along with some face-to-face meetings. Although satisfaction rose last year among charity leaders participating in what became a virtual coaching experiment, they reported fewer indirect benefits such as relationship and network-building.  198 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Melanie May | 9 June 2021 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis “We’re exploring options to develop independent living apartments along with a new contemporary hub to host our activities that will further promote the welfare of disabled people in our region. We will benefit tremendously from external input as we embark on this business transformation.” Among this year’s recipients are Disability North, Kingstanding Regeneration Trust, The Children’s Foundation, Stockport Women’s Centre, and One Roof Leicester. Disability North CEO Dr Victoria Armstrong said:center_img Pilotlight research also shows an appetite for skilled volunteering among UK workers. A poll during the pandemic revealed that one in ten workers (11%) already gives their time to charity with the help of their employer, whilst 50% want to volunteer their professional skills to charities but struggle to find the time or means to do so. Over three quarters of workers said they expect business to help people volunteer. The Small Charity Leaders Insight Report 2020 published by Pilotlight in the Autumn, showed an unmet demand for external pro bono support from those running smaller charities with around two-thirds (66%) of those polled for the report said they were actively seeking skilled pro bono support at the end of 2020, but nearly half (44%) were concerned that managing corporate volunteers would be time-consuming. About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. “Last year taught us a lot about delivering online leadership coaching and we discovered many unexpected benefits for charity leaders and for senior professionals offering their time. Despite the easing of lockdown restrictions, starting with these twenty charities, we will keep the best of what we have learned, using virtual delivery at key points, helping to engage charity Board members through the ease of access. We also believe it will power our ambitions to attract a larger and more diverse group of business leaders to join us.” Each charity will receive strategic planning support from a dedicated, senior team facilitated by leadership charity Pilotlight along with a core grant of £6,500 from Garfield Weston Foundation. Advertisement Tagged with: Awards Main image: Weston Charity Award winner Disability North: Vici Richardson and her son, Zak Twenty frontline charities from the North of England, the Midlands and Wales have won this year’s Weston Charity Awards. “As the pandemic shifts, we are seeing an altered landscape for small charities. Our selected charities have shown courage and resilience this year in delivering vital services in the face of uncertainty and growing need. This year, more than ever, the Foundation is helping charities shift gear by providing dedicated support for long-term planning. The Weston Charity Awards have a proud record of helping charities to adapt services, diversify income and thrive into the future.”last_img read more

Lebanon’s Hezbollah group says it shot down Israeli drone

first_imgBEIRUT (AP) — Lebanon’s militant Hezbollah group says its fighters have shot down an Israeli drone over a southern village near the border with Israel. The Israeli military did not confirm Hezbollah’s claim but said a drone has crashed on Lebanese territory. It says there’s no risk of breach of information. Monday’s downing comes after months of rising tensions amid Israeli airstrikes on Iran-backed fighters in neighboring Syria. Hezbollah’s al-Manar TV claims the drone was shot down after it entered Lebanon’s air space. It says the drone crashed in the village of Blida, near the border with Israel, and that Hezbollah fighters now have the unmanned aircraft.last_img

Arsenal star Mesut Ozil explains why he invented his trademark finish

first_imgMesut Ozil produced his trademark bounce shot to score against Liverpool in December 2017 (Picture: Getty)Mesut Ozil has revealed he uses his trademark bounce shot because he believes it is a far more effective technique to employ in a one-on-one situation than a conventional chip shot.The Arsenal playmaker is a far from frequent goalscorer these days and has found the back of the net only once this season. The 31-year-old has, however, perfected the art of deceiving goalkeepers in an almost unique fashion.By kicking down on the top of the ball, Ozil creates elevation and has left a string of Premier League No.1s utterly bemused. The former Germany international used that particular method to score against both Crystal Palace and Bournemouth last season and famously did so against Liverpool in a pulsating 3-3 draw at the Emirates back in December 2017.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT / Read More Skip Ad PLAY About Connatix V67539 1/1 Advertisement Top articles Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling Arsenal star Mesut Ozil explains why he invented his trademark finish Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 13 May 2020 7:27 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link4.4kShares Read More Read More Advertisement Full Screen Comment Skip Coming Next ‘If you chip the ball it will go slowly to the goal, if you do it like this it’s still a chip but quicker. If you do it like that with power so the ball is going over the goalkeeper, don’t forget they are always jumping to the left or right.‘If you show them you will shoot and they are jumping they will never expect that.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalOzil has reestablished his position as a key member of the Arsenal side following Mikel Arteta’s appointment as Unai Emery’s successor. The former Real Madrid star has started all 10 games since his former Arsenal teammate joined from Manchester City. MORE: Robin van Persie reveals Arsene Wenger’s ‘crucial’ words of advice at ArsenalMORE: Manchester United should have signed Arsenal legend Tony Adams, says Phil NevilleFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. SPONSORED by Metro 1 min. story Video Settings Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Asked to explain how and why he invented the technique, Ozil said: ‘If I’m running in front of the goal and the goalkeeper is jumping like that, sometimes if you make a chip the defender can run and clear it. Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Read More Read Morelast_img read more

Equinor begins public consultations for UK offshore wind extensions

first_img“One area we’re specifically looking for input on is to help us inform the criteria for the site selection of the onshore substation area, close to the Norwich Main substation, as well as feedback to assist us in refining the detail of the onshore cable route from Weybourne to the substation site.” The second phase will be held in spring 2021 when the company will present its refined plans, invite comments to the Preliminary Environmental Report (PEIR) and provide additional information including visualizations of what the projects will look like onshore and from the coast.  Equinor plans to submit the Development Consent Order (DCO) application by the end of 2021. Equinor said it had developed a range of options online and via dedicated communications lines due to the current social distancing practice to invite feedback and ensure that all interested parties have access to the information.  They are being developed as one project with an integrated grid option. Cables from the extension projects will come ashore at Weybourne, before being installed in a trench heading south towards a new onshore substation, near to the existing National Grid Norwich Main Substation. Equinor has launched the community consultation period for the Sheringham Shoal and Dudgeon offshore wind extension projects off the North Norfolk coast in the UK. The Dudgeon and Sheringham Shoal extensions are two of the seven offshore wind extension projects that the Crown Estate selected in August 2019 following a plan level Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA). “It’s really important to us to hear from the community at this early stage of the project, so that we can consider feedback from the local people as the projects develop,” said Kari Hege Mørk, Project Manager at Equinor. This first phase will run from 9 July to 20 August, and feedback is sought for the location of the onshore substation, the underground onshore cable route and any lessons that can be taken from the earlier construction of the Sheringham Shoal and Dudgeon offshore wind farms. After completing this first phase of consultations, Equinor will publish a report summarising the feedback received and how this is being considered.last_img read more