Another Bulker Handed Over to GOGL

first_imgzoom Dry bulk shipping company Golden Ocean Group Limited (GOGL) has taken delivery of one more secondhand bulker bought in March this year within a 16-vessel deal.The ship in question is the 81,500 dwt Q Ioanari which will now be renamed Golden Ioanari.Q Ioanari was built at South Korean Hyundai Mipo shipyard in 2011. Its market value currently stands at USD 19.47 million, VesselsValue’s data shows.Of the 16 vessels acquired, 14 were bought from subsidiaries of Quintana Shipping, and two ice class Panamax vessels from subsidiaries of Seatankers, an affiliate of Hemen Holding, the company’s largest shareholder. Under the terms of the agreement, the company would issue in aggregate 17.8 million consideration shares and assume debt of USD 285.2 million.Golden Ocean said it has issued 1.3 million consideration shares to Quintana Shipping and associated companies in exchange for the vessel.Following this transaction, the company’s issued share capital is USD 6,116,149.1 divided into 122,322,992 issued shares, each with a nominal value of USD 0.05.Q Ioanari is the seventh bulker from the batch delivered to the company so far. Earlier this week, Q Myrtalia and Q Shea were handed over to GOGL. Additionally, Q Kennedy and Q Amreen joined the company’s fleet in early May. Last month, Q Sue and Q Kaki were also delivered to GOGL.last_img read more

UCSD researcher supports Presidents vow to stop the spread of HIV

first_img Posted: February 5, 2019 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Sasha Foo, February 5, 2019 Sasha Foo UCSD researcher supports President’s vow to stop the spread of HIV 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – It’s been 35 years since doctor Doug Richman treated his first patient with the HIV virus, at a time when the odds of survival were grim.Almost four decades later, with the development of new drugs, HIV can be controlled.In the research community, the emphasis is on finding ways to make the life saving drugs even more effective and accessible.Doctor Richman is a professor at the Aids Research Center at the University of California San Diego.He supports President Trump’s pledge to halt the spread of the HIV virus by the year 2030. The goal is ambitious, but it’s not exactly new. In 2013, the World Health Organization set a similar objective, with a handful of countries including Australia, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Denmark, Namibia, and Botswana already reaching that goal.The United States still lags to reach that goal, with an estimated 40,000 new infections reported every year. Richman says it’s possible to stem the spread of HIV, but the federal government needs to make a much stronger commitment.Richman points to New York City as a model for managing the virus. In New York, people who are infected, are identified and promptly given the drugs for treatment. In some states, especially in the southeast, people with HIV have a more difficult time getting the drugs to help control it.Richman says it will take political will and more money to make the changes in public policy to help stop the spread of HIV. last_img read more