Whitwell wires Corona Kicker foes at Southern Oklahoma

first_imgFeature Results Kyle Robinson started 14th and finished second. Butler, Chase Vineyard and 21st starting Tyler Bragg rounded out the top five. “I got a good draw and got out to a good lead early,” he said. “Dean showed me his now with five or six to go. I moved down and held him off.” Dean Abbey regained the lead following a late restart and went on to win the Saturday Corona Kicker feature for Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods. (Photo by Jordana Keel) Modifieds – 1. R.C. Whitwell; 2. Ethan Braaksma; 3. Matt Guillaume; 4. Josh McGaha; 5. Chris Elliott; 6. Jeff Taylor; 7. Ken Schrader; 8. Chris Bragg; 9. Mike Hansen; 10. Glen Hibbard; 11. Jon White Jr.; 12. Kelsie Foley; 13. Ashton Wilkey; 14. Jeffrey Abbey; 15. Wesley Veal; 16. Travis Mosley; 17.  Larry Adams; 18. Josh Cain; 19. Tyler Stevens; 20. P.J. Egbert; 21. Justin White­head; 22. Mark Adams; 23. Curtis Allen; 24. Tanner Blac  And after leading start to finish of the main event at Southern Oklahoma Speedway, the Tucson, Ariz., driver collected a $1,250 check for his latest Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifying vic­tory.  More than 140 IMCA drivers ran at Ardmore with Saturday wins going to Jeffrey Abbey in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and Dean Abbey in the Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods. R.C. Whitwell led every lap in winning Friday’s Corona Kicker feature for IMCA Modifieds at South­ern Oklahoma Speedway. (Photo by Jordana Keel) Jeffrey Abbey, a former Modified track champion at Ardmore, was back on the track for the first time in most of two months and held off his older brother in getting the Stock Car win. William Gould, the 19th starting Guillaume and Ryan Powers were next across the stripe.  ARDMORE, Okla. (May 1-2) – After winning his heat race, R.C. Whitwell knew he’d be going into Friday’s Corona Kicker IMCA Modified feature with a fast car. center_img “The car was pretty decent in the heat race handling-wise. We didn’t make any changes for the feature,” said Whitwell, who’d made just two previous starts at Southern Oklahoma, in 2017 and last year. “Our setup was good, we had a fast car and it ended up working pretty good for us.”  And Dean Abbey got the lead back from Tate Butler after a restart after running second most of the 20-lap feature for the Southern SportMods, which also saw 50-plus entries. “It was a good feeling to get back to racing,” said Abbey, who plans to be a regular at Ardmore this season. “It was good to get back to a little normalcy.”  Matt Guillaume, Josh McGaha and Chris Elliott completed the top five. Hard charger Jeff Taylor started 16th and ended in sixth. Fifty-six Modifieds contested at the opening night show in Ardmore and nine states were repre­sented in the evening’s headline event. Pole starter Whitwell ran the bottom most of the 20-lapper, go­ing to the top in the second set of turns to work through lapped traffic and outrunning Ethan Braaksma to the checkers.  Stock Cars – 1. Jeffrey Abbey; 2. Dean Abbey; 3. William Gould; 4. Matt Guillaume; 5. Ryan Pow­ers; 6. Tommy Fain; 7. Dennis Bissonnette; 8. Cary White; 9. A.J. Dancer; 10. Aaron bene­dict; 11. Dustin White; 12. Todd Decker; 13. Rob Moseley; 14. Jeramey Bradley; 15. Kenny Mer­ritt; 16. Sam Spadaro Jr.; 17. John Hobbs; 18. Troy Burkhart; 19. Marcus Hahn; 20. Shelby Wil­liams; 21. Erik Miles; 22. Bobby Miller; 23. Jason Batt; 24. Landon Mattox. Saturday Corona Kicker checkers flew for IMCA Sunoco Stock Car winner Jeffrey Abbey. (Photo by Jordana Keel) Southern SportMods – 1. Dean Abbey; 2. Kyle Robinson; 3. Tate Butler; 4. Chase Vineyard; 5. Tyler Bragg; 6. Matthew Day; 7. Kaden Honeycutt; 8. Blaine Shives; 9. Tommy Dove; 10. Trevor Foley; 11. Casey Brunson; 12. Ryan Thomas; 13. Matt Beasley; 14. Cullen Hill; 15. Shawn Gra­ham; 16. Zack Oliva; 17. Trey Willoughby; 18. Austin Bonner; 19. Justin Cox; 20. Brandon Wat­son; 21. Jared Baird; 22. Shelby Williams; 23. Tyler Honeywell; 24. Chase Raymond.last_img read more

MESSENGERS OF PEACE

first_imgYoung people, especially those with opportunities to travel out of the shores of Liberia, are in despair because of the level of our social development when compared to that of other European and countries in the Western hemisphere. During a recent dialogue among peace messengers on our basic rights to social services, we noticed that most young people attributed rights to social services to include access to telecommunication, social media and the good things of life.My generation is thrown off their basic social rights by the good things of other developed countries and fails to take cognizance of the limitations to social services like their limitation to good job, good water supply and sanitation, electricity, good access roads, basic housing for all, food security, quality health care and education. We have not even began to contemplate the issues associated to environmental pollution of our beaches, soil erosion, land degradation and climate change to mention a fewLast week, the IMF ranked Liberia 181 of 184 countries with the lowest and poorest economy of the world today. A Governance Commission report released recently at a Monrovia function said the lack of effective human capital has consistently served as a major impediment to the growth of the country’s economy and its overall output.The report also noted that for Liberia to achieve its middle income target by 2030, it requires putting systems in place that are reflective of the actual needs of the various sectors. “The economies must be fused effectively to address the core problems at the center of Liberia’s under-development,” the report indicated.At Messengers of peace, we noticed the logic that undergirds the report centers on corruption, the greed for money and quick fixes, power and control. The fixation of leaders, ministers and people with authority to implement change underpins our rights basic social services. Throughout history, African, particularly Liberians, we have endured various unbalanced political and social systems and if we do not address the core issue, our future to a balance social and political systems would be denied.The Ebola epidemic has brutally exposed the weakness of our social system as well as the limitations of our basic social infrastructure and it would be in our best interest to benefit from the lessons learned. We need to educate our children through the stories and information we provide them with.We are living in a period of capitalism and besides preserving our cultural values and ideology, we should not ask when or where the next meal would be available. We should not ask whether our children would have access to basic education or health care. Given the resources of this country, we should not depend on any nation for support in building our social system or in ensuring the rights of our citizens to basic social services are protected. It is the duty of our Government to provide these services and it’s our prerogative to demand them.Support the “Ebola Educates” Campaign in kind through your stories or with your generous cash donation.Until next week, when we come to you with another article on: “Ebola Educates- The price of peacekeeping”, Peace First, Peace above all else, May Peace prevail on earth.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more