Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Closes Out Weekend Run At Montana’s KettleHouse Amphitheater

first_imgOn Sunday night, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead closed out their weekend run with a performance at Bonner, MT’s gorgeous KettleHouse Amphitheater. The show marked JRAD’s debut performance in Montana.JRAD opened up their first set with “Samson and Delilah”, giving Joe Russo a chance to flex his chops behind his drum kit out of the gates. The fierce “Samson” opener coasted into a bouncy “Dancing In The Streets”, highlighted by some explosive guitar work from Tom Hamilton and Scott Metzger. Dancing smoothly segued into “The Wheel”, which featured teases of Bob Dylan‘s “What Was It You Wanted”, American Babies‘ “Jolene”, and “Cassidy”. The quintet charged forward with “New Speedway Boogie”, played for the first time in 2019.KettleHouse’s natural beauty brought out the best in the mastermind musicians, as they coasted out of “New Speedway Boogie” into an improvisational “Jam” segment, which was followed up by a dark and raucous take on “The Other One”. Russo and bassist Dave Dreiwitz locked into a heavy-hitting rhythmic pocket, presenting an opportunity for Hamilton, Metzger, and keyboardist Marco Benevento to sail away to a jazzy, spacey realm. Joe Russo’s Almost Dead closed out their first set with an open-ended “Shakedown Street”, featuring teases of Phish‘s “Stash”, along with “King Solomon’s Marbles” and “Shakedown Street”.Following a setbreak, the band returned to give “Shakedown” the proper treatment with a “Shakedown Street Reprise”, featuring a full band tease of “Dancing In The Streets”, as well as a funky tease of Phish’s “Bathtub Gin” out of Hamilton’s corner. The glorious “Shakedown” finale made way for a unique rendition of Bob Weir‘s “Gonesville”, off of his 2016 Blue Mountain solo LP. “Gonesville” segued into a tender “Jack A Roe” before the band landed into “Eyes Of The World”. Hamilton and Metzger traded off a series of ever-evolving solos, which eventually brought the band into “Estimated Prophet”.The five-piece powerhouse was preaching on the burning shores of the KettleHouse Amphitheater, backed by Joe Russo’s octopus-like moves and impressive flips of his drum sticks. “Estimated” was followed up by “Jack Straw” before the band brought their second set to a halt with “Morning Dew”. The band delivered a lone encore of “Promised Land”, played for the first time since March 15th, 2018 in Syracuse, a gap of 48 shows.Next up for Joe Russo’s Almost Dead is a pair of festival appearances at Bethel Woods, NY’s Mountain Jam and Manchester. TN’s Bonnaroo. For ticketing information and a full list of the band’s upcoming tour dates, head to Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s website.Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | KettleHouse Amphitheater | Bonner, MT | 6/2/2019Set One: Samson > Dancing In The Streets @ -> The Wheel # -> New Speedway Boogie ## -> Jam -> The Other One -> Shakedown Street $Set Two:  Shakedown Street Reprise % > Gonesville -> Jack A Roe -> Eyes Of The World ^ -> Estimated -> Jackstraw > Morning DewEncore: Promised Land &@ – With a DD Solo that teased “Drive My Car” (The Beatles)# – With a “What Was It You Wanted” (Bob Dylan) Tease (MB), a “Jolene” (American Babies) Tease (Band) and a Cassidy Tease (TH)## – Not played since 2018-10-25 Hulaween – Amphitheatre Stage, Spirit of the Suwanee Music Park Live Oak, FL, a gap of 24 shows$ – With a “Stash” (Phish) Tease (SM), King Solomon’s Marbles Teases (Band), Dancing In The Streets Teases (Band), Unfinished% – With Dancing In The Streets Teases (Band), “Bathtub Gin” (Phish) Teases (TH), Not played since 2018-04-21 Sweetwater 420 Festival, Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta, GA, a gap of 45 shows^ – With Dancing In The Streets Teases (SM) and a Ruben & Cherise Tease (MB)& – Not played since 2018-03-15 Landmark Theatre, Syracuse, NY, a gap of 48 Showslast_img read more

Highlighting rural America on education map

first_img Your Harvard session in Atlanta probes ways in which system has fallen short, could improve The fight for equality in education Of nearly 51 million K–12 students in the U.S., about 9 million attend rural schools. Yet despite being one-sixth of the nation’s student body, rural students, and rural education in general, are often overlooked in debates about education policy, specialists say.Some Harvard-trained educators would like to change that.During their one-year master’s program at the Graduate School of Education, Morgan Barraza ’18, Shane Trujillo ’18, and Julia Cunningham ’18, bonded over their commitment to the issue, working through the Rural Educators Alliance to foreground hurdles faced by students and teachers in rural settings. The group was co-founded by Cunningham and Carlye Sayler ’18.“One of the missions of the group is to challenge the perceptions of rural America,” said Cunningham, who taught at an Oglala Lakota Nation school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota before enrolling at the Ed School. “Whenever anyone thinks of rural education, the picture that comes to mind for the most part is not of Native American students or black students in the South. It’s usually white Appalachia, and that’s not the whole picture.”To shed light on the complexity of rural America, the group this spring organized a week of panels on identity, school practices, issues of gender and sexual diversity, and more.Over the summer, the students will develop a virtual toolkit, with a list of resources, to be sent to Ed School faculty to help them cover rural education issues in their courses. The goal is to ensure that the School remains committed to addressing rural education, said Barraza, who worked as a high school teacher at the Laguna Pueblo Reservation and in Aztec, both in New Mexico.As Barraza noted, faculty at the Ed School have supported the group’s efforts. “Whenever anyone thinks of rural education, the picture that comes to mind for the most part is not of Native American students or black students in the South. It’s usually white Appalachia, and that’s not the whole picture.” — Julia Cunningham ’18 Opening the gates, closing the education gap Relatedcenter_img “Rural schools are a lifeblood of education in the country,” said Matt Miller, associate dean for learning and teaching. “As Mara Tieken, doctoral alumna of the Harvard Graduate School of Education and leading thinker on rural education, taught me over the years, we can’t talk about rural education as ‘not urban.’ Scholars and policymakers need to understand rural communities and their educational needs on their own terms.”Experts say rural students lack the choices and opportunities available to urban students. According to the 2017 Report of the Rural School and Community Trust, more than 25 percent of the country’s public schools are rural, but only 17 percent of state education aid goes to rural districts. The organization listed lack of resources, teacher shortages, and limited childcare and early education programs among the challenges schools face in states such as Mississippi, Arizona, Alabama, South Carolina, South Dakota, Georgia, Nevada, Florida, Oklahoma, and Alaska. The challenges extend to Native American students growing up on reservations or in small towns. During their time at Harvard, Barraza, Trujillo, and a handful of students joined forces to draw attention to education among Native Americans.A member of the Laguna Pueblo and Salt River Pima tribes, Barraza co-chaired Future Indigenous Educators Resisting Colonial Education, a group founded by Adrienne Keene, Ed.D. ’14. In March, the organization held a series of events highlighting issues that affect Native American communities, from the plight of missing and murdered indigenous women to tribal justice to feminism in indigenous communities.“I feel a personal obligation,” said Barraza, who plans to teach in the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian community, a tribe located in the metropolitan area of Phoenix. “Too often, issues regarding contemporary Native American peoples are not addressed, and indigenous and Native American peoples are blocked out of the conversation.”“We live in a culture where indigenous peoples are seen as historical figures, or if they’re contemporary representations, they’re seen as broken and we need to go and save them,” said Trujillo. “We’re trying to highlight voices that have been lost in the margins.”Courtney Van Cleve, Ed.L. ’20, who is pursuing a doctorate in education leadership, will take the helm of the Rural Educators Alliance this fall. For Van Cleve, who has spent most of her life in Mississippi schools as a student, teacher, principal, and regional director, it’s the perfect fit.“Rural education remains at the core of my personal and professional identity,” she said.Change is overdue, Van Cleve said, partly because of increasingly prominent divides between rural and urban America, but mostly because rural students deserve the same opportunities as their urban peers.“There is a real opportunity for systems across contexts to learn from each other in shaping the future of education reform,” she said. In D.C. gathering, Faust and faculty discuss the importance of equity in learning last_img read more