Highlighting rural America on education map

first_img Your Harvard session in Atlanta probes ways in which system has fallen short, could improve The fight for equality in education Of nearly 51 million K–12 students in the U.S., about 9 million attend rural schools. Yet despite being one-sixth of the nation’s student body, rural students, and rural education in general, are often overlooked in debates about education policy, specialists say.Some Harvard-trained educators would like to change that.During their one-year master’s program at the Graduate School of Education, Morgan Barraza ’18, Shane Trujillo ’18, and Julia Cunningham ’18, bonded over their commitment to the issue, working through the Rural Educators Alliance to foreground hurdles faced by students and teachers in rural settings. The group was co-founded by Cunningham and Carlye Sayler ’18.“One of the missions of the group is to challenge the perceptions of rural America,” said Cunningham, who taught at an Oglala Lakota Nation school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota before enrolling at the Ed School. “Whenever anyone thinks of rural education, the picture that comes to mind for the most part is not of Native American students or black students in the South. It’s usually white Appalachia, and that’s not the whole picture.”To shed light on the complexity of rural America, the group this spring organized a week of panels on identity, school practices, issues of gender and sexual diversity, and more.Over the summer, the students will develop a virtual toolkit, with a list of resources, to be sent to Ed School faculty to help them cover rural education issues in their courses. The goal is to ensure that the School remains committed to addressing rural education, said Barraza, who worked as a high school teacher at the Laguna Pueblo Reservation and in Aztec, both in New Mexico.As Barraza noted, faculty at the Ed School have supported the group’s efforts. “Whenever anyone thinks of rural education, the picture that comes to mind for the most part is not of Native American students or black students in the South. It’s usually white Appalachia, and that’s not the whole picture.” — Julia Cunningham ’18 Opening the gates, closing the education gap Relatedcenter_img “Rural schools are a lifeblood of education in the country,” said Matt Miller, associate dean for learning and teaching. “As Mara Tieken, doctoral alumna of the Harvard Graduate School of Education and leading thinker on rural education, taught me over the years, we can’t talk about rural education as ‘not urban.’ Scholars and policymakers need to understand rural communities and their educational needs on their own terms.”Experts say rural students lack the choices and opportunities available to urban students. According to the 2017 Report of the Rural School and Community Trust, more than 25 percent of the country’s public schools are rural, but only 17 percent of state education aid goes to rural districts. The organization listed lack of resources, teacher shortages, and limited childcare and early education programs among the challenges schools face in states such as Mississippi, Arizona, Alabama, South Carolina, South Dakota, Georgia, Nevada, Florida, Oklahoma, and Alaska. The challenges extend to Native American students growing up on reservations or in small towns. During their time at Harvard, Barraza, Trujillo, and a handful of students joined forces to draw attention to education among Native Americans.A member of the Laguna Pueblo and Salt River Pima tribes, Barraza co-chaired Future Indigenous Educators Resisting Colonial Education, a group founded by Adrienne Keene, Ed.D. ’14. In March, the organization held a series of events highlighting issues that affect Native American communities, from the plight of missing and murdered indigenous women to tribal justice to feminism in indigenous communities.“I feel a personal obligation,” said Barraza, who plans to teach in the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian community, a tribe located in the metropolitan area of Phoenix. “Too often, issues regarding contemporary Native American peoples are not addressed, and indigenous and Native American peoples are blocked out of the conversation.”“We live in a culture where indigenous peoples are seen as historical figures, or if they’re contemporary representations, they’re seen as broken and we need to go and save them,” said Trujillo. “We’re trying to highlight voices that have been lost in the margins.”Courtney Van Cleve, Ed.L. ’20, who is pursuing a doctorate in education leadership, will take the helm of the Rural Educators Alliance this fall. For Van Cleve, who has spent most of her life in Mississippi schools as a student, teacher, principal, and regional director, it’s the perfect fit.“Rural education remains at the core of my personal and professional identity,” she said.Change is overdue, Van Cleve said, partly because of increasingly prominent divides between rural and urban America, but mostly because rural students deserve the same opportunities as their urban peers.“There is a real opportunity for systems across contexts to learn from each other in shaping the future of education reform,” she said. In D.C. gathering, Faust and faculty discuss the importance of equity in learning last_img read more

Gabriella Pizzolo Officially Moves Into Fun Home

first_img Fun Home Gabriella Pizzolo is set to officially begin performances as Small Alison in Fun Home on October 6. She steps in for Tony nominee Sydney Lucas, who she had previously understudied, in the Tony-winning musical. The production is playing at Broadway’s Circle in the Square.Based on the graphic novel by Alison Bechdel, Fun Home charts a girl’s quest to come to terms with her father’s unexpected death. As she moves between past and present, Alison dives into the story of her volatile, brilliant father and relives her unique childhood at her family’s funeral home.The cast of Jeanine Tesori and Lisa Kron’s tuner also includes Michael Cerveris, Judy Kuhn, Beth Malone, Emily Skeggs, Roberta Colindrez, Zell Morrow, Joel Perez and Oscar Williams. View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 10, 2016last_img read more

Between the lines

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Delaware St. looks to end streak vs BCU

first_imgSUPER SENIORS: Bethune-Cookman has benefited heavily from its seniors. Cletrell Pope, Isaiah Bailey, Wali Parks, Malik Maitland and Leon Redd have collectively accounted for 70 percent of all Wildcats points this season, though their output has dropped to 41 percent over the last five games.CLAMPING DOWN: The Hornets have allowed only 81.7 points per game across 10 conference games, an improvement from the 88.5 per game they gave up to non-conference opponents.JUMPING FOR JOHN: John Crosby has connected on 36.8 percent of the 136 3-pointers he’s attempted and has made 6 of 23 over his last five games. He’s also made 74.4 percent of his foul shots this season.YET TO WIN: The Wildcats are 0-7 when they score 65 points or fewer and 12-6 when they exceed 65 points. The Hornets are 0-20 when allowing 71 or more points and 3-1 when holding opponents below 71.ASSIST DISTRIBUTION: The Wildcats have recently created buckets via assists more often than the Hornets. Delaware State has an assist on 29 of 81 field goals (35.8 percent) over its previous three games while Bethune-Cookman has assists on 41 of 80 field goals (51.3 percent) during its past three games.DID YOU KNOW: Both Bethune-Cookman and Delaware State are ranked at the top of college basketball when it comes to tempo. The Wildcats are ranked 10th in Division I with 75.4 possessions per game this season while the Hornets are ranked seventh with 76.4 offensive opportunities per game. Associated Press Delaware St. looks to end streak vs BCU February 16, 2020center_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditBethune-Cookman (12-13, 6-5) vs. Delaware State (3-21, 2-8)Memorial Hall, Dover, Delaware; Monday, 7:30 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Bethune-Cookman looks to extend Delaware State’s conference losing streak to five games. Delaware State’s last MEAC win came against the Coppin State Eagles 77-68 on Feb. 1. Bethune-Cookman came up short in a 66-58 game at Maryland Eastern Shore in its last outing. ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.comlast_img read more

PSG breaks its hex with the eighth Champions

first_imgThose of Favre settled for 20 minutes in the Parc des Princes, but without disturbing Keylor Navas. Sancho and Hazard were always Dortmund’s options to come out on the counterattack, but the German team gave the impression of being very conservative. He did not look for the 0-1 and he only closed pass lines to avoid that Neymar received comfortable. Cavani had the clearest chance at 25, but Burki avoided 1-0 with a great save.PSG turned the tie before the break thanks to two errors by the rival. Neymar’s 1-0 lead, the Madrid academy player Achraf loses the mark very easily, and On Bernat’s second goal, Dortmund’s central defenders were uncoordinated, allowing Sarabia to receive a legal position and assist the left-back.In the second part, PSG began to catch the result of the match. The 2-0 put the Parisians in quarters, and although it had some chance of danger, Dortmund gradually grew. Tuchel entered Kurzawa as winger to endure the result, Emre Can was expelled from a fight with Neymar and there was hardly time for anything else. The party was life or death for PSG. No public because of the coronavirus, and with a Tuchel gambling the position, the Parisians were forced to win to avoid another bump in the Champions League. The German left Mbappé on the bench (he was in doubt until the last minute), gave Sarabia the title and placed Paredes in the center of the field, next to Gueye. The losses of Thiago Silva, Verratti and Meunier already in themselves conditioned the initial approach. Favre, meanwhile, repeated the three-way system from the first leg. After three consecutive years falling in the knockout stages of the Champions League, PSG broke its hex after defeating Dortmund 2-0 and trailing 2-1 in the first leg in Germany. Neymar scored the first and Bernat signed the victory before the break. Goals1-0, 27 ‘: Neymar, 2-0, 45 ‘: Bernat ChangesKylian Mbappe (63 ‘, Sarabia), Brandt (68 ‘, T. Hazard), Gio Reyna (70 ‘, Witsel), Layvin Kurzawa (78 ‘, Say María), Gotze (86 ‘, Achraf Hakimi), Nianzou Tanguy Kouassi (91 ‘, Walls) It was not a brilliant first part in Paris. The lack of public was evident in the intensity that both teams printed for 45 minutes. The Parisians returned for an instant to seeing ghosts with Neymar, after a bad fall from the Brazilian in the 8th minute that left him uncertain for several minutes due to a blow to the shoulder. CardsReferee: Anthony TaylorVAR Referee: Stuart AttwellErling Braut Haland (15 ‘, Yellow) Hummels (60 ‘, Yellow) Bernat (67 ‘, Yellow) Emre Can (88 ‘, Red) Neymar (89 ‘, Yellow) Marquinhos (89 ‘, Yellow) Say mary (89 ‘, Yellow) Kylian Mbappe (92 ‘, Yellowlast_img read more