Delhi has to wait a bit to read

Chinese writer Mo Yan, who has won this year’s Nobel Prize for literature, is relatively unknown to Indian readers and book shops in the capital were Friday scrambling to put his books on their shelves.Books by Mo are not easy to come by, complained a reader.‘I wanted to know about Mo Yan when I heard that he had received the Nobel Prize for literature, but none of the book shops in south Delhi had any of his books,’ Soma Basu, a resident of Greater Kailash, said. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’But book shops said they were doing their best to comply with the sudden demand for Mo, who plots his narratives around the socio-historical perspectives of China on massive colourful canvases.Midland, a reputed book retail chain in the capital, is getting copies of Mo’s Garlic Ballads from its publisher, Arcade, in the US.‘Not many people have read Mo Yan. Till this week, he was completely unknown. But since Thursday, readers have been walking into my shop for his books,’ M A Baig, the founder of the chain said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe bookstore does brisk business in the novels of popular Chinese writer Gao Xinjiang – the Chinese emigre to France who in 2000 was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.‘Three of Gao’s books, Soul Mountain, One Man’s Bible and Buying a Fishing Rod sell fairly well… Now Mo’s books will find takers,’ Baig said.Bahrisons in the capital’s Khan Market expects to receive its first consignment of Mo’s books soon.‘We don’t have any books by Mo Yan but his rival Haruki Murakami, who was in the race for the Nobel Prize, sells very well in the country. Mo Yan is not popular but the Nobel Prize has changed his popularity status in India… By Saturday we hope to get fresh stocks from distributors,’ a spokesperson for Bahrisons said. Crossword, one of the biggest book chains in the capital, does not have Mo Yan on its shelves either.‘Not now… Later,’ said a spokesperson for the Crossword Bookstore at Rajouri Garden in the capital.For online readers, Mo’s Change and Red Sorghum are available on Flipkart and Infibeam.Foreign publishing companies in India are not yet ready to meet any sudden interest in Mo Yan’s novels.A spokesperson for Pan Macmillan said: ‘The publishing house has not yet published any of Nobel Laureate Mo Yan’s books.’‘He is still unknown in India and around the world. But now that he has won a Nobel Prize, it will draw readers to his books,” the spokesperson for Pan Macmillan India said.The acclaimed Red Sorghum: A Novel on China, spanning the saga of three generations of a family in the 1930s, which was made into an Oscar-winning movie, has been published in translation by Penguin US. ‘The book is available in India,’ the publisher said. The book sells because of its popularity on screen.‘The Nobel Prize is a political call these days and the idea of giving one to a Chinese author could be a politically fraught decision in a year which saw the famous Chinese dissident Chen Guang Chen… seek refuge in the American Embassy; [Mo’s] books bring out the other side of China,” senior communications executive Manish Singh, an avid reader of the classics, told IANS.According to reports from China, Mo’s latest and most popular “Frog” about China’s “one child birth control” has sold more than 200,000 copies since it was published in 2009. It is yet to reach the Indian audience in translation. read more

Acker Bilk famous jazz clarinetist dies

first_imgEnglish clarinet player Acker Bilk, who beat the Beatles and other British rockers to the top of the US music charts with the instrumental ‘Stranger on the Shore,’ has died at the age of 85. Manager Sutton said Bilk died on Sunday at a hospital in Bath,  England. The cause of death was not announced.Born Bernard Stanley Bilk in 1929 in the southwestern English county of Somerset, Bilk adopted the name Acker from a local slang term for friend.He learned the clarinet as a bored army conscript, stationed in Egypt after World War II, and became one of the stars of Britain’s 1950s ‘trad jazz’ scene.last_img

Season special

first_imgThis season, immerse in mesmerising regional handloom weaves like Maheshwari, Kota, Ikats and fine Bandhini along with block printed textiles in Ajrakh, Bagru and Dabu styles. Splendid garments, fabrics and furnishings embellished with regional embroideries will be available in Ari, Sindhi, Lambani, Sozni and Applique. Organic cottons and naturally dyed children’s clothing with eco herbal essential oils and designer combs made out of neem will showcase versatility of natural materials. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Traditional leather footwear along with tribal, bead and thread based jewellery that shall surely leave you asking for more. Pottery, wood carving, cotton dhurries will feature along with environment-friendly handmade Moonj baskets along with Candles, Sikki and Paper Mache decoratives.Regional painting forms like Madhubani, Kalamkari and Tanjore shall further leave you spellbound. Ruaab-sewa brings you craft products from Ethiopia, for the very first time. Hand-spun cotton handlooms, carved leather bags and purses, decorative clay items and painted pottery tea-sets along with jewellery made from indigenous Ethiopian wood and a selection of local Ethiopian silver jewellery will be showcased. It will be a cross cultural exchange of traditions and discover the hospitality of their ritual ‘Coffee Ceremony’ using their famous “Bunna” coffee. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixOne of the many unique Indian crafts represented, will be Rogan Paintings by Md. Jabbar A. Khatri from Kutch, Gujarat. The rare technique is only practiced by 10 people in the village of Nirona in Kutch, and the importance for giving these artists a strong market platform was evident in Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, choosing a Rogan Painting to be India’s gift to US President, Barrack Obama.Dastkar, a registered NGO working with crafts and craftspeople for over three decades, strongly believes in crafts as a catalytic tool for social and economic empowerment and earning. It aims to  break the barriers that separate craftspeople from mainstream urban markets, reviving and revitalizing both the craft and the community.Where: The Nature Bazaar Avenue, Kisan Haat, near Chhatarpur metro stationWhen:  February 12 – Feb 23 Timings: 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Entry: Rs. 20last_img read more

In the Realm of Myths

first_imgA solo exhibition of paintings, pop-up art and installation by Sankha Banerjee titled ‘In the Realm of Myths’ is starts today at India International Centre in the national Capital and continues till September 27.The dialectical dynamics between myths and reality in India is quite alluring. The myths possess an exuding all-embracing attitude in its acceptance of multiple identities. And the dichotomy of myths and reality can also create a Babel-like chaotic confusion. Anyone can experience the feeling of being a voyeur in the realm of Indian myths and its metaphorical narrations.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn the annals of myths, stories have always been associated with multitude layers of grandeur to express society and the people of India. Myths can also speak succinctly about society and its system. Even though myths derive and create philosophical turmoil within a social context. The forms and characters of mythical stories themselves change with changes in cultural, social and political contexts, and they seek to explore these trajectories within and also without the broader spectrum of time and space. Myths also trek towards a vantage point-literally and metaphorically with the flow of human lives, in both their macro and microcosmic versions.Sankha Banerjee, the artist endeavours the mapping of several myths of both ancient and urban society of India. His recurrent viewing of humanity in myths and narration as leitmotif makes him view them through a magnified prism to understand them. Through his art he tries to address the multiplicity of narratives in a non-linear manner of a bygone era adjacent with the present.last_img read more