Shining a light on quantum bits

first_img Researchers create quantum calculator Quantum computing, no cooling required In the world of quantum computing, interaction is everything.For computers to work at all, bits — the ones and zeros that make up digital information — must be able to interact and hand off data for processing. The same goes for the quantum bits, or qubits, that make up quantum computers.But that interaction creates a problem — in any system in which qubits interact with each other, they also tend to want to interact with their environment, resulting in qubits that quickly lose their quantum nature.To get around the problem, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Ph.D. student Ruffin Evans turned to particles mostly known for their lack of interactions — photons. This research was supported with funding from the NSF, the CUA, the DoD/ARO DURIP program, the AFOSR MURI, the ONR MURI, the ARL, the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship program, the DoD NDSEG, and the NSF GRFP. Scientists coax photons to bind into molecules for first time New system could shed light on a host of complex processes center_img Working in the lab of Mikhail Lukin, the George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics and co-director of the Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative, Evans is lead author of a study, described in the journal Science, that demonstrates a method for engineering an interaction between two qubits using photons.“It’s not hard to engineer a system with very strong interactions, but strong interactions can also cause noise and interference through interaction with the environment,” Evans said. “So you have to make the environment extremely clean. This is a huge challenge. We are operating in a completely different regime. We use photons, which have weak interactions with everything.”Evans and colleagues began by creating two qubits using silicon-vacancy centers — atomic-scale impurities in diamonds — and putting them inside a nano-scale device known as a photonic crystal cavity, which behaves like two facing mirrors.“The chance that light interacts with an atom in a single pass might be very, very small, but once the light bounces around 10,000 times, it will almost certainly happen,” he said. “So one of the atoms can emit a photon, and it will bounce around between these mirrors, and at some point, the other atom will absorb the photon.”The transfer of that photon doesn’t go only one way, though.“The photon is actually exchanged several times between the two qubits,” Evans said. “It’s like they’re playing hot potato; the qubits pass it back and forth.”Piecing together the process: The microscope objective (the big metallic barrel coming down from the top of the image), the diamond sample (the small plate that looks like glass in the center of the image), and the optical fiber that couples to the sample (glowing green point just above the sample). Credit: Denis SukachevWhile the notion of creating interaction between qubits isn’t new — researchers have managed the feat in a number of other systems — there are two factors that make the new study unique, Evans said.“The key advance is that we are operating with photons at optical frequencies, which are usually very weakly interacting,” he said. “That’s exactly why we use fiber optics to transmit data — you can send light through a long fiber with basically no attenuation. So our platform is especially exciting for long-distance quantum computing or quantum networking.”And though the system operates only at ultra-low temperatures, Evans said it is less complex than approaches that require elaborate systems of laser cooling and optical traps to hold atoms in place. Because the system is built at the nano scale, he added, it opens the possibility that many devices could be housed on a single chip.“Even though this sort of interaction has been realized before, it hasn’t been realized in solid-state systems in the optical domain,” he said. “Our devices are built using semiconductor fabrication techniques. It’s easy to imagine using these tools to scale up to many more devices on a single chip.”Evans envisions two main directions for future research. The first involves developing ways to exert control over the qubits and building a full suite of quantum gates that would allow them to function as a workable quantum computer.“The other direction is to say we can already build these devices, and take information, read it out of the device and put it in an optical fiber, so let’s think about how we scale this up and actually build a real quantum network over human-scale distances,” he said. “We’re envisioning schemes to build links between devices across the lab or across campus using the ingredients we already have, or using next-generation devices to realize a small-scale quantum network.”Ultimately, Evans said, the work could have wide-reaching impacts on the future of computing.“Everything from a quantum internet to quantum data centers will require optical links between quantum systems, and that’s the piece of the puzzle that our work is very well-suited for,” he said.In addition to Evans and Lukin, the study represented a collaboration with Marko Loncar, the Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering, and Hongkun Park, the Mark Hyman, Jr. Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Physics.“We feel that these kinds of collaborations will create a backbone of the new Harvard Quantum Initiative for Science and Engineering,” Lukin said. Related Seeing light in a new way Harvard researchers create room-temperature quantum bits that store data for nearly two seconds last_img read more

CDC says delay of Chiron flu vaccine not a problem

first_imgAug 27, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Close to half of the nation’s influenza vaccine doses will be shipped later than expected this fall, but everyone who wants a flu shot should ultimately be able to get it, federal health officials said today.Chiron Corp. announced yesterday that it is delaying release of its flu vaccine doses until early October because some lots of vaccine didn’t meet sterility standards. The company said it expects to ship 46 million to 48 million doses, down from the 50 million doses predicted previously.But Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said today the CDC still expects that about 100 million doses of vaccine, more than ever before, will be available this year.”Those who are used to receiving their shot in early October may not get it then,” Gerberding said. But, “The bottom line is that right now we’re expecting to have enough flu vaccine so that everybody who needs flu vaccine can have it. . . . For folks who are trying to plan for their immunization, the best thing is to stay tuned to messages from your local health officers and your clinician.”The other flu vaccine manufacturers are expected to deliver their product on schedule, Gerberding reported. Chiron and Aventis Pasteur are each expected to produce roughly half of the projected 100 million doses, while MedImmune is likely to supply about 1.5 million doses of the intranasal vaccine FluMist, she said.Chiron anticipates shipping 40 million doses in October, and MedImmune also will deliver its doses in October, according to Gerberding. After shipping a few doses this month, Aventis anticipates delivering 15 million to 20 million doses in September and the rest in October, she said.”We’re confident that we’ll be able to get vaccination programs started on time with the doses that we do have,” Gerberding commented.Neither Chiron nor Gerberding revealed exactly what caused the problem with the Chiron vaccine, produced in Liverpool, England. The company announcement said “a small number of lots” failed to meet sterility specifications. “While ongoing internal investigations into the root cause of the variance indicate no widespread issues with the manufacturing process, Chiron has delayed releasing any Fluvirin doses until it has completed additional release tests,” the announcement said.Gerberding said Chiron officials told her they “have identified the problem, they’re fixing it, and they’re taking extra steps to make sure they have a safe product before they ship it.”Chiron said its planned “late-season delivery” of 2 million Fluvirin doses for the CDC stockpile for the Vaccines for Children program remains on schedule. Those doses are in addition to the 46 million to 48 million produced for general distribution.Gerberding said the vaccine lots affected by the sterility problem don’t include any pediatric vaccine. “We’re not expecting a decrease in total predicted doses available for children at this time,” she said.In response to a question, she said Chiron’s vaccine production problems, to her knowledge, were not related to thimerosal, a mercury compound used as a preservative in most flu vaccine doses. The CDC predicted in May that 6 million to 8 million doses of thimerosal-free flu vaccine would be produced this year for people concerned about the preservative.Gerberding said flu vaccine delays are nothing new. “As recently as 2001 we had some shipments that were delayed until October. . . . We’ve been here before, we’ve done this before, and we’ve handled it.”The CDC, she noted, recommends flu vaccination for people aged 50 and older, those who have a chronic medical condition or weakened immunity, those who expect to be pregnant during the flu season, children aged 6 to 23 months, healthcare workers, and people in close contact with others in the foregoing categories.last_img read more

Robert & Sons Aluminum awards go to Deery Series champion, rookie of the year

first_imgNEWNAN, Ga. – Both the champion and rookie of the year in the Deery Brothers Summer Series receive product awards again this season courtesy of Robert & Sons Aluminum.The top driver in overall point standings and the top finishing first-year competitor in the 31st annual tour for IMCA Late Models each get 10 sheets of aluminum from the Newnan, Ga., company.In its third year as an IMCA sponsor, Robert and Sons also distributes aluminum for commercial uses that range from trailers to signage and storefronts throughout the US, Canada and Latin America. More information is available by calling 800 206-8836, on Facebook and at the www.rsaluminum.com website.Champion of the 2016 Deery Series was Tyler Bruening. Rookie of the year was Cayden Carter.“We want to congratulate Tyler and Cayden on their accomplishments last season. We are happy to be a part of the IMCA team and are excited to help support the upcoming season with these same awards for 2017,” said Robert & Sons Vice President Steve Hinely. “Our goal has been to offer superior quality and customer service and also to provide new colors and finishes that have not been available in the past to help give the drivers the best looking car on the race track.”“This year we have added to our metallic finish line three more colors for a total of eight different colors. We now are stocking, white, black, red, chevron blue, yellow, charcoal, champagne and silver metallic and combined with our other stock colors, we offer more colors and finishes than any other supplier,” he continued. “To see our product be successful in its end use serves as our motivation to continue to provide and create new colors which is offered through a nationwide dealer network.”Roberts and Sons product certificates will be presented during the national IMCA awards banquet in November.“We’ve had different champions and rookies of the year in each season Robert & Sons has been a part of the IMCA program and with the beginning of the 2017 Deery Brothers Summer Series on the horizon, we are anxious to see if that trend continues,” IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder said. “Thanks to Robert & Sons Aluminum for their commitment to IMCA Late Model racing.”Opening night for the upcoming Deery Series is April 1 at 34 Raceway in West Burlington, Iowa.last_img read more

Betsson moves on full CSR transparency by launching OneBetsson.com

first_img Share Kindred marks fastest route to ‘normal trading’ as it delivers H1 growth July 24, 2020 GiG lauds its ‘B2B makeover’ delivering Q2 growth August 11, 2020 Betsson outrides pandemic challenges as regulatory dramas loom July 21, 2020 Related Articles Submit Share StumbleUpon Jesper Svensson – Betsson ABBetsson AB has launched onebetsson.com, a new information portal detailing full transparency on the firm’s social responsibility directives and sustainability initiatives.Onebetsson.com will allow the public to access information and maintain progress on Betsson’s ongoing social commitments, partnerships, action plans and corporate social responsibility directives.Launching a key platform, Jesper Svensson, CEO for Betsson Operations, said: “At Betsson, we have always been involved in and contributed to the societies where we are located.“Recently we have taken this engagement to the next level – some 10 months ago, we have launched a new global Local Community Engagement strategy which saw the creation of location-based committees in all our offices across the globe. The new www.onebetsson.com site is a result of this concerted effort.”Betsson’s CSR website is split into three core sections:‘Responsible Gambling’ – sees Betsson provide information on its safer gambling inventory helping identify vulnerable players‘Local Community Engagement’ – provides information and updates on Betsson’s community-led social directives which have been undertaken in  Malta, Sweden, Estonia, Georgia, and Hungary‘Partnerships’ – details Betsson AB’s corporate mandate of investing in sports through partnership, with the aim of improving standards and community access to sports resources.Svensson added: “We have always been at the forefront of responsible gambling and corporate social responsibility, with this new website we are offering complete transparency in terms of social impact initiatives that we’re part of and hope that by doing so, others will follow suite.”last_img read more