CDC says delay of Chiron flu vaccine not a problem

first_imgAug 27, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Close to half of the nation’s influenza vaccine doses will be shipped later than expected this fall, but everyone who wants a flu shot should ultimately be able to get it, federal health officials said today.Chiron Corp. announced yesterday that it is delaying release of its flu vaccine doses until early October because some lots of vaccine didn’t meet sterility standards. The company said it expects to ship 46 million to 48 million doses, down from the 50 million doses predicted previously.But Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said today the CDC still expects that about 100 million doses of vaccine, more than ever before, will be available this year.”Those who are used to receiving their shot in early October may not get it then,” Gerberding said. But, “The bottom line is that right now we’re expecting to have enough flu vaccine so that everybody who needs flu vaccine can have it. . . . For folks who are trying to plan for their immunization, the best thing is to stay tuned to messages from your local health officers and your clinician.”The other flu vaccine manufacturers are expected to deliver their product on schedule, Gerberding reported. Chiron and Aventis Pasteur are each expected to produce roughly half of the projected 100 million doses, while MedImmune is likely to supply about 1.5 million doses of the intranasal vaccine FluMist, she said.Chiron anticipates shipping 40 million doses in October, and MedImmune also will deliver its doses in October, according to Gerberding. After shipping a few doses this month, Aventis anticipates delivering 15 million to 20 million doses in September and the rest in October, she said.”We’re confident that we’ll be able to get vaccination programs started on time with the doses that we do have,” Gerberding commented.Neither Chiron nor Gerberding revealed exactly what caused the problem with the Chiron vaccine, produced in Liverpool, England. The company announcement said “a small number of lots” failed to meet sterility specifications. “While ongoing internal investigations into the root cause of the variance indicate no widespread issues with the manufacturing process, Chiron has delayed releasing any Fluvirin doses until it has completed additional release tests,” the announcement said.Gerberding said Chiron officials told her they “have identified the problem, they’re fixing it, and they’re taking extra steps to make sure they have a safe product before they ship it.”Chiron said its planned “late-season delivery” of 2 million Fluvirin doses for the CDC stockpile for the Vaccines for Children program remains on schedule. Those doses are in addition to the 46 million to 48 million produced for general distribution.Gerberding said the vaccine lots affected by the sterility problem don’t include any pediatric vaccine. “We’re not expecting a decrease in total predicted doses available for children at this time,” she said.In response to a question, she said Chiron’s vaccine production problems, to her knowledge, were not related to thimerosal, a mercury compound used as a preservative in most flu vaccine doses. The CDC predicted in May that 6 million to 8 million doses of thimerosal-free flu vaccine would be produced this year for people concerned about the preservative.Gerberding said flu vaccine delays are nothing new. “As recently as 2001 we had some shipments that were delayed until October. . . . We’ve been here before, we’ve done this before, and we’ve handled it.”The CDC, she noted, recommends flu vaccination for people aged 50 and older, those who have a chronic medical condition or weakened immunity, those who expect to be pregnant during the flu season, children aged 6 to 23 months, healthcare workers, and people in close contact with others in the foregoing categories.last_img read more

Croatia Sends England Back Home

first_imgEngland’s bid to reach a first World Cup final since 1966 came to an end in the last four as they lost in extra time to Croatia in Moscow.FC Juventus striker, Mario Mandzukic was the hero of the night after he scored the match winner in the 109th minute, connecting from left side from Ivan Perisic’s flick-on into the area.Perisic’s volley sent the match into extra time after Kieran Trippier had given England a fifth-minute lead with a sublime free-kick. Unfancied before the competition, Gareth Southgate’s young side defied expectations by reaching the semi-finals, but were undone by an experienced Croatia side.England, playing in their first World Cup semi-final since 1990, got the perfect start through Trippier’s brilliant free-kick and Croatia were finding it extremely difficult to deal with England’s high-tempo game.Harry Kane could have doubled the lead but was denied by goalkeeper Danijel Subasic and Jesse Lingard placed a shot wide from a good position.Croatia grew into the game in the second half and equalised through Perisic, and the Inter Milan winger hit the post with a low drive shortly after.In extra time John Stones saw a header cleared off the line, while Pickford made a brilliant save from Mandzukic’s close range effort – but the Everton man could do nothing about the winner.England will now play Belgium in Saturday’s third/fourth place play-off in St Petersburg.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Panel wants DOJ’s take on rape claim

first_imgThe suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Beaumont, claims Jones lived in a coed barracks and, after enduring harassment from some of the men in the quarters, was drugged and raped July 28, 2005. Her attackers were Halliburton and KBR firefighters, the suit claims. The petition says the facility was under direct control of the U.S. government, KBR and Halliburton, collectively. Jones’ attorney, L. Todd Kelly, declined to say where Jones was living now because she fears for her safety. He declined to elaborate. Jones’ Web site highlights her nonprofit foundation to help fellow contract workers who may have been sexually assaulted, and displays her “therapeutic” still-life paintings that she offers to paint on commission. The site also mentions a screenplay of her story in Iraq. In a statement, KBR said it couldn’t comment on specifics of the case but that the safety and security of its employees were its top priority. Halliburton says it is improperly named in the matter and expects to be dismissed from the case. “It would be inappropriate for Halliburton to comment on the merits of a matter affecting only the interest of KBR,” the oil-field-services company said in a statement. Rep. Ted Poe, R-Texas, who signed Conyers’ letter, sent his own inquiry to Mukasey on Monday. He said Jones’ father contacted his office after the alleged rape and said his daughter reported KBR/Halliburton was holding her in a shipping container without food and water. Poe said he then contacted the State Department, which dispatched agents to rescue Jones.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champConyers also seeks clarification on a statement from KBR, the military contractor that split from Halliburton in April, that says it had initiated investigations into the alleged assault but later halted the probe. KBR has said it was “instructed to cease by government authorities because they were assuming sole responsibility for the criminal investigations.” Justice Department spokesman Peter Carr said Tuesday that the agency was reviewing Conyers’ letter. “The department is investigating this matter, and because it’s an ongoing investigation we are unable to comment further,” Carr said. Jones’ case got renewed attention this week after ABC News previewed a report of the allegations it plans to air on “20/20” next month. Jones began working for KBR as an administrative assistant in 2004 when she was 19, but later transferred to Iraq with another Halliburton subsidiary, according to her lawsuit. HOUSTON – The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee asked the Justice Department on Tuesday to give a full account of its investigation into the alleged rape of a female contract worker in Iraq two years ago. Jamie Leigh Jones, a former Conroe resident, filed a federal lawsuit in May against Halliburton Co., its former subsidiary, KBR Inc., and others, saying she was raped by co-workers while working for a Halliburton subsidiary at Camp Hope, Baghdad, in 2005. The Associated Press usually does not identify people who say they have been sexually assaulted, but Jones’ face and name have been broadcast by ABC News and appear on her own Web site. In a letter dated Tuesday, Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., asked Attorney General Michael Mukasey whether his office had investigated Jones’ claims and whether the Justice Department has jurisdiction to prosecute under military provisions of the USA Patriot Act. last_img read more