Septic systems

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaLike hot water and electricity, your home septic system is one ofthose things you may not think about every day. That is, until itstops working. Then it’s all you think about.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Kent McVaysays an easy way to prevent septic system problems is to haveyour system inspected every few years. Training the state’s installers”Septic system installation used to be as simple as knowing a guywith a backhoe,” McVay said. “Now, installation is much moreprofessional. And the state requires installers to attend whatamounts to one day of training every two years to earn eighthours of continuing education credits.”UGA specialists, engineers, state environmentalists and industryconsultants teach with both classroom and hands-on field trainingin the UGA program.About 4,000 Georgians are employed as installers. Another 400soil scientists and engineers work in the field, McVay said.With 70 percent to 80 percent of new home construction using on-site septic systems, McVay says septic system installation should be regulated because improper installation can severely impact public health.”The soils in Georgia are capable of taking careof this waste,” he said. “But the systems need to be installedcorrectly.”For a list of upcoming trainings, call McVay at (770) 233-5506or email him at [email protected] Pay now or pay laterIf you haven’t had your home septic system inspected in fiveyears, McVay recommends making an appointment with a septic tankpumper.”You may not want to spent the $200 or $300 for the inspectionand pumping now,” he said, “but it’s a lot cheaper than diggingup your lawn and installing new drain fields because youneglected your system.”McVay recently joined the UGA faculty in Griffin, Ga., asdirector of the university’s wastewater management educationprogram. He teaches proper septic system installation proceduresto installers across the state and at on-site training centers inGriffin and Hazlehurst.Each site demonstrates various types of septic system designs.The sites and the training program are funded by the GeorgiaDepartment of Human Resources, with support from the GeorgiaOnsite Wastewater Association.center_img An ounce of prevention”It’s not a pleasant topic, but it’s something that has to bedealt with,” McVay said. “The easy way to remember it’s time tohave your septic system cleaned is to have it done every electionyear.”To help extend the life of your home septic system, McVay offersthese tips:* Minimize water usage. “Your system can handle only so muchwater at a time,” he said. “Keep that in mind when you’re washingclothes, taking showers and running the dishwasher.”* Don’t use a garbage disposer. “If you’re on a home septicsystem, compost your kitchen scraps,” McVay said. “This canreduce the organic load by as much as 50 percent and help yourhome garden, too.”* Reduce harsh chemical usage. “Don’t use chlorine bleach toclean everything in your home,” he said. “Moderate use is okay,but excessive use kills the useful bacteria that are working tobreak down bacteria in your septic system.”last_img read more

Wisconsin faces Mankato, hoping to keep perfect start at home

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)Six down, two to go.After a perfect home stand to start off the season, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team closes out its home slate against Minnesota State Mankato (2-3-1, 1-3-0) this weekend.Sporting an undefeated record, the Badgers (6-0-0, 4-0-0) hope to stay perfect through two more games at the Kohl Center before hitting the road.“Well, you know you want to take care of business at home and obviously we’ve had a great home stand up to this point,” head coach Mark Johnson said. “I don’t know who put the schedule together, but to give us eight straight home games, you know you certainly want to grab your points now and be successful here. It’s nice for the younger players, it’s nice for the group to get some confidence and put some nice wins behind us.”Mankato isn’t the strongest of the WCHA teams, but Wisconsin isn’t going to underestimate it. Last season, the Badgers lost their first game ever to the Mavericks after 46 wins.The Badgers may hold a huge advantage over the Mavericks throughout the series at 43-1-2, but they know it’ll still be a tough battle on the ice.“Most of the games you look at four or five years ago you could predict, whereas now, a lot of the games we look at around the country on the women’s side becomes a toss up,” Johnson said. “If you want to win, there’s certain things you have to do. If you don’t do those things, then you run the risk of giving the game away or losing a hockey game.”The Mavericks have had six different players score goals, and freshman forward Kathleen Rogan leads the team with four goals and two assists.While Mankato has given up 20 goals on the season already, they’ve also scored three or more goals in each of their wins. As a result, Wisconsin won’t be letting up or taking plays off on defense.“Mankato is a hard working team and they’re going to come at us the whole game,” senior defenseman Geena Prough said. “We have to be prepared to play a whole 60 minutes.”“I think it’s the same as any other weekend, any other team that we’re playing,” junior forward Carolyne Prevost added. “I don’t really know much about them this year, obviously they have a new team. We’ll just prepare this week.”The Badgers feel confident they’ll have a successful weekend, but instead of playing at night, they have to start sharing the Kohl Center with the men’s team, pushing their game time up to 2 p.m.Johnson is focusing on getting his team prepared for an earlier game with just as much strength and focus as if it was a few hours later.“The hard part is getting ready for a Friday afternoon game compared to a night game,” Johnson said. “The kids have classes during that period of time. I’m trying to work with the players to be focused and ready to play when they drop the puck.”Before heading out on the road next weekend, Wisconsin needs to take care of business at home.Prough knows the squad will use the crowd at home to pump them up and help them play their kind of hockey.“We’re going to feed off of the crowd at the Kohl Center,” Prough said. “That always gets us going. We’re 6-0 right now, so we obviously want to stay undefeated and just keep working hard and play our game. Hopefully we’ll be successful at the end of the weekend.”last_img read more