CDC’s Cox honored as top federal employee

first_imgSep 28, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Influenza expert Nancy Cox, PhD, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was named federal employee of the year yesterday by a nonprofit group.Cox, 58, director of the CDC’s Influenza Division, received the award in Washington, DC, from the Partnership for Public Service, a nongovernmental organization that promotes excellence in government employees. She was honored for her work to help the United States and the world prepare for an influenza pandemic, according to a CDC news release yesterday.”Nancy Cox embodies the best of what CDC is about—world-class scientists serving on the front lines each and every day to protect America’s health,” said CDC Director Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, in the CDC release. “Her dedication and leadership of CDC’s influenza activities are truly making a difference in the country’s fight against seasonal influenza as well as in the world’s preparation for the next influenza pandemic.””I’m very honored to receive this award,” Cox said in the CDC release. “I feel like it’s a reflection of the excellent work done by many, many people who’ve worked on influenza at CDC—both in the past and present—and have helped build our influenza program into what it is today.”An Iowa native, Cox received a bachelor’s degree in bacteriology from Iowa State University and a doctorate in virology from the University of Cambridge, England. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, before joining the CDC in 1975.Cox assumed leadership of the CDC’s 14-person influenza group in 1992. The division now comprises more than 100 staff members.Under Cox’s direction, the Influenza Division monitors for new influenza strains or outbreaks that could signal a pandemic, assists countries around the globe in investigating flu outbreaks, recommends strains for the seasonal flu vaccine, and conducts a variety of influenza virus studies, according to the CDC news release.Cox has received numerous scientific and achievement awards, the CDC said. In addition, she was recognized by Time magazine as one of 2006’s 100 most influential people and by Newsweek as one of the “15 People Who Make America Great.”See also:Sep 27 CDC news releasehttp://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/r060928.htmlast_img read more

Football braced for financial impact from coronavirus outbreak

first_imgDomestic club football across much of Europe has been halted completely due to the coronavirus pandemic, with Germany following France, England and Scotland in suspending their competitions on Friday, while UEFA has postponed Champions League and Europa League games due to be played next week. Football has been suspended in many European leagues due to the coronavirus outbreak, and the economic impact could be considerable for clubs Numerous countries had been initially planning to carry on playing matches behind closed doors, following the example of several Champions League and Europa League games this midweek, but that was not to everyone’s liking. “My opinion is that all competitions should be suspended. In China they have been more responsible than they have been in Europe,” said Andre Villas-Boas, the coach of French club Marseille who previously worked in China, where more than 3,000 people have been killed by the virus. However, there is also an economic reality, with clubs dependent on income from ticketing and matchday hospitality, as well as from TV deals for broadcasting matches. “At the end of the day, it’s about financing professional football,” Bayern Munich chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge warned when asked if it might be better to stop playing football in Germany for the rest of the season. “If payments due from broadcasters don’t come in, a lot of small and mid-size clubs will have liquidity problems.” – ‘Serious implications’ – According to a study by Spanish radio station Cope, La Liga clubs would lose a combined total of over 600 million euros ($665m; 536 million pounds) in income from television and ticketing if no more matches were played this season. The impact on certain clubs could therefore be extremely serious, and the knock-on effects considerable in a country where almost 200,000 people have employment related to football, and where the sport represents 1.4 percent of GDP, according to La Liga. In England, Premier League clubs who have profited from huge television deals should be able to handle a few weeks without matches, but the effects will immediately be felt elsewhere, with games in the Football League, the three divisions below the top flight, postponed as well as in the Women’s Super League. “For the rest of football, it’s quite different (to the Premier League) as they rely on gate receipts and commercial activities, with a very small part coming from the media,” Peter Coates, the chairman of second-tier side Stoke City, told the BBC. “This will have serious financial implications, with some clubs possibly running out of money.” Loading… TV companies who have paid big money for the rights to show football now have no live action to offer paying subscribers In a country like Scotland, where there are no big broadcast deals to offer a safety net, the situation could quickly become dire. Ominously, Scottish Professional Football League chief executive Neil Doncaster has warned clubs “to examine their insurance arrangements in case of matches being affected.” While nobody could realistically have seen such a scenario coming, the next few weeks will at least be a test of how well run many clubs around Europe are. – TV companies forced to adjust – Postponing matches by a few weeks is preferable to carrying on playing games behind closed doors precisely because money from broadcasters will eventually come in along with revenue from ticketing, sponsors and hospitality. However, there are still major concerns. “The real immediate problem is cash flow because none of that will come in for at least a month. That is where we will see which clubs are well run and have a healthy economic model,” pointed out Jean-Pierre Caillot, the president of French Ligue 1 outfit Reims.center_img Promoted ContentIs This The Most Delicious Food In The World?Who’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Laugh, Cry, Or Just Relax With The Best Series Streaming On HBOPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D Graffiti10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs6 Most Unforgettable Bridges In The World10 Stunning Asian Actresses No Man Can ResistFascinating Ceilings From Different Countries8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hysterical Read Also: Five more Serie A players test positive for coronavirus In the meantime, TV companies who have paid vast sums for those broadcast deals now have no live games to offer their paying subscribers. Across Europe, they will have to adjust accordingly in the coming days and weeks. “They support the decision, we are in an exceptional situation and the broadcasters understand,” said Didier Quillot, the Director General of the French League, of their broadcast partners, Canal Plus and beIN Sports. They, along with clubs across the continent, must now sit tight and hope that action being taken by governments around Europe proves effective at slowing the outbreak and allows football to resume again soon, in front of crowds. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

College antics

first_imgMEMBERS of the gerrymandered California Senate, the great champions of democracy that they are, (once again) want to change the way Californians vote for president. On Monday, the Senate approved legislation that would effectively bypass the Electoral College. If enough other states passed similar legislation, California’s electoral votes wouldn’t go to the presidential candidate more Californians voted for, but the one who took the most votes nationwide. In other words, in 2004, Californians, despite voting overwhelmingly for John Kerry, would have handed a landslide electoral victory to George W. Bush. In theory, anyway. That’s assuming that electors – rabid partisans chosen by the Republican and Democratic establishments, respectively – could somehow be coerced into voting against their party loyalty. And that’s an optimistic assumption, at best. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! If this cockamamie idea sounds familiar, it’s because the Legislature passed (and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger wisely vetoed) identical legislation last year. If legislators are serious about getting rid of the Electoral College, they ought to push for doing so by the means the Constitution prescribes – a constitutional amendment. Meanwhile, legislation that’s sure to be vetoed, and which would only disenfranchise the state’s voters if signed into law, is a futile effort in the name of democracy. Let’s see our legislators do something about democracy where they actually can make a difference. Instead of passing this ill-fated symbolic gesture a second time, it would be nice if the Legislature would pass redistricting reform even once.last_img read more