Alumni enjoy working for alma mater

first_imgStephanie Mola graduated from Notre Dame in 2009 and moved to Florida to work for Johnson & Johnson, but a “Notre Dame itch” brought her back to South Bend a year later. “Along the way there just seemed to be a big part of me missing and a lot of it pointed me back here,” she said. “And this just kind of fell in my lap and seemed like the perfect fit.” Now, as the Notre Dame Alumni Association’s young alumni programs manager, Mola is one of many young graduates to work for her alma mater. While Mola said she is happy to be back at Notre Dame, there are differences between being a student on campus and being an employee. For example, she said students are not necessarily aware of the number of people who work on campus as full-time University employees. “Now I walk around and see all these people I work with that I didn’t really know existed before,” she said.  One difficult part of returning to Notre Dame as an employee, Mola said, is separating herself from student life because she has friends who are still undergraduates. As a former Notre Dame softball player, it is especially difficult for her to be on campus but no longer playing with the rest of the team. “It’s hard to seem them. It’s hard to go by the field and hear about them going to practice, and I’m not going with them,” she said. Because Mola graduated recently, however, she said she is better able to do her job at the Alumni Association, where she organizes programs for both for current students and alumni who graduated within the past 10 years. Mola said she has also learned since she began working at the Alumni Association that people who work for the University, even if they are not alumni, are just as enthusiastic about Notre Dame as the student body. “I guess an easy parallel from both perspectives is Notre Dame’s pretty well-known for having great people,” she said. “Everybody here is so welcoming and wants you to do well, just like when you were a student.” Mola said she does not know what she will do in the future, especially since her current position is best filled by a young alum. She said she would be open, however, to other positions at the University. “I’ll tell you, I left this place once and it’s going to be hard to do it again,” she said. “So I can definitely see myself staying here for a long time.” John Whitty, a 2010 Notre Dame graduate who now works for the athletic department’s Joyce Grants-in-Aid Program, said he also experienced a transition from being a student to being a University employee. Unlike Mola, Whitty began working for Notre Dame immediately following graduation. “I think it’s definitely a different experience working for a university than attending a university, but it’s been a good opportunity to see the different sides of the University as a whole,” Whitty said. “And I’m bummed that my card doesn’t work at the dining hall anymore.” He currently works with donors who give enough to the Athletic Department each year to fund one student athlete’s scholarship. Whitty did not plan to stay at Notre Dame following graduation, but he began working in the athletic department during the second semester of his senior year.  “As the semester progressed, I talked to my superiors and they expressed interest in keeping me,” he said. “It was pretty much too good of an opportunity to pass up. So I decided to stay here and it’s actually worked out pretty well.” Because he works for the athletic department, Whitty said the contrast between his life and that of undergraduate students is perhaps best exemplified on home football weekends. “I get to see a lot of insider stuff from places we take the donors, but it’s definitely not … the student weekend football experience,” he said. “I’m pretty busy on football weekends, but I definitely don’t get to tailgate.” Although he would like to go to graduate school for business or sports administration in the future, Whitty said he is happy in his current role at the University. “I like where I’m at right now, but I’m always open to options other places as well,” he said. “There’s no question that if there were positions available … I would stay at Notre Dame.” Sarah Rodts, also a 2009 Notre Dame graduate, began working for the University’s athletics media relations office following graduation. Rodts had planned to go to law school following graduation, but said she realized last spring she was not passionate about it. During the final semester of her senior year, she cancelled her plans to work at a law firm in Chicago and decided to work toward her dream of being a sports broadcast reporter. Now, she splits her time between two jobs: one at Notre Dame, and one at WNDU, a local television station. “In terms of whether or not I thought I would end up doing it last year at this time, absolutely not, … but as it’s all falling into place, it could not be more perfect,” Rodts said. “I’m learning a lot about athletics and how it is to work in the media, but then I’m on the other side of it, too.” Rodts said one of the highlights of working for athletics media relations thus far was serving as the University liaison to an Adidas production crew that came to campus on a football weekend to shoot a commercial.  While it is difficult to transition from student life to working 13-hour days, seven days a week, Rodts was prepared for the change. “I was going to have to separate my undergrad life from the post-grad life,” she said. In addition, she said her busy work schedule does not allow her much time to miss being a student.  Even though she was prepared to face this transition, Rodts said it is hard when she does not have time to see her friends who are still undergraduates. But her current positions are perfect for her planned career path, and she is happy to remain at Notre Dame. “I’m still so much a part of the University, and I don’t feel like graduation has made me any less a part of it,” she said.last_img read more

Ameren Plans Missouri’s Largest Wind Farm

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:Ameren Missouri announced plans Monday for a 400 megawatt wind farm in rural northeast Missouri, creating enough power to serve 120,000 homes within two years. St. Louis-based Ameren said its High Prairie Wind Farm near Kirksville will be the largest in the state.Ajay Arora, vice president of power operations and energy management at Ameren Missouri, called it a significant step toward Ameren’s goal of reducing carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050. “What’s most important for our customers is to have a balanced energy mix,” Arora said in an interview. “That would be a combination of hydro, nuclear, natural gas, coal, wind, solar. Our portfolio has it all. And that provides the affordability and reliability that our customers expect.”Plans call for 175 450-foot-tall wind turbines on land in Adair and Schuyler counties, near the Iowa border about 200 miles north of St. Louis. Groundbreaking is expected in summer of 2019, and the turbines are expected to be operational by 2020, Arora said.Arora said northern Missouri in general is a “good wind resource.” The state’s largest current wind farm, operated by Lenexa, Kansas-based Tradewind Energy Inc., opened last year in northwest Missouri and can generate 300 megawatts of electricity, or enough to power 100,000 homes.Additional but smaller wind farms could follow. Arora said Ameren plans to spend around $1 billion by 2020 toward a goal of generating at least 700 megawatts of wind-generated energy. Ameren Missouri also plans to add 100 megawatts of solar-generated energy over the next decade, the company said.More: Ameren Plans 400-Megawatt Wind Farm, Missouri’s Largest Ameren Plans Missouri’s Largest Wind Farmlast_img read more

Hales out of England World Cup squad

first_img(REUTERS) – Batsman Alex Hales has been withdrawn from England’s preliminary World Cup squad to avoid any “unnecessary distractions” ahead of the showpiece tournament, the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) said on Monday.Hales is serving a three-week ban for recreational drug use, the Guardian newspaper reported on Friday.“We’ve worked hard to create the right environment around the England team and need to consider what is in the best interests of the team…” Managing Director of England Men’s Cricket, Ashley Giles, said in a statement.“I want to make it clear this is not the end of Alex’s career as an England player. The ECB and the PCA will continue to aid Alex and work alongside his county club Nottinghamshire to give him the support he needs, to help him fulfil his potential as a professional cricketer.” The Nottinghamshire batsman will not travel to Ireland for a one-off ODI on Friday and has also been removed from England’s ODI and Twenty20 squads against Pakistan.The selectors added Nottinghamshire batsman Ben Duckett and Middlesex batsman Dawid Malan to the squad for the Ireland trip and the T20 against Pakistan after Jason Roy and Mark Wood were ruled out. Roy is unavailable after suffering a back spasm, while Wood will feature for Durham in the domestic ODI competition against Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire Vikings.The pair will return for the five-match ODI series against Pakistan which begins on May 8. They will be joined by Hampshire batsman James Vince, who was also included in the 17-man squad. A replacement for Hales in the World Cup squad must be named by May 23, when final squads are submitted to the International Cricket Council.Hales was fined and suspended for his involvement in a nightclub altercation with team mate Ben Stokes in 2017. The 30-year-old was given a six-match one-day international ban in December. He had already missed two games and the remainder of the ban was suspended for 12 months so he could be available for selection.The 50-over World Cup begins on May 30 with England taking on South Africa in the opening match in London.last_img read more

Wisconsin to host Michigan still in search of first Big Ten win

first_imgFollowing last weekend’s road series at Minnesota, the Wisconsin men’s hockey team will look to get their first conference win this weekend when it returns home to face No. 15 Michigan Friday and Saturday night.As road underdogs last weekend, the Badgers battled Minnesota to a 2-2 tie in their first game before dropping the second game of the series to the Gophers 5-2.This weekend, Wisconsin (2-13-3) will have a tough task ahead of itself once again going up against Michigan (13-7-0), who is ranked 15th in the nation and sits atop the Big Ten standings.Wisconsin’s series with Michigan will be its fourth straight series against a top 20 ranked team, but Badgers head coach Mike Eaves said Monday he believes it is a positive thing for his team.“When you play against ranked teams, regardless of what the results are on paper, you become better. You’re drawing up to play at a higher level,” Eaves said. “For our kids, that’s a good thing.”Eaves added he wants his team put together strong performances in back-to-back games, as opposed to last weekend when the Badgers played well in their first game against Minnesota and poorly in the second one.“We’re not where we need to be because if you want to be a big time team, you’ve got to be able to play back to back nights,” Eaves said. “We haven’t been able to do that yet.”Unfortunately for Wisconsin, they will have to play the series without junior defenseman Eddie Wittchow, who was suspended two games by the Big Ten after receiving a disqualification penalty in the Badgers’ finale against Minnesota.According to Eaves, Wittchow’s absence is a major blow to their defensive depth, and will provide an opportunity for younger, more inexperienced players to take on larger roles.With Wittchow out, the Badgers will be counting even more on senior goaltender Joel Rumpel, who is coming off a 45 save performance last Saturday, to keep pucks out of the net. Rumpel has carried the Badgers as of late, with a save percentage of 92.0 over his last nine games.If Wisconsin wants to upset Michigan this weekend, it will also need to continue having success on the penalty kill. The Badgers killed all five of their penalties last weekend against Minnesota after struggling the previous two series against Michigan Tech and Boston University, yielding six power-play goals in four games.The Badgers will also hope Grant Besse can carry over his hot offensive stretch from the Minnesota series. Besse, Wisconsin’s leading goal-scorer with six, scored three times last weekend including a two-goal performance in the second game against the Gophers.Friday night’s game between the Badgers and 15th ranked Wolverines will start at 8 p.m. and will air on the Big Ten Network, while Saturday’s game will start at 7 p.m.last_img read more

ANGLERS MAKE IT SAFELY TO SHORE AFTER ALERT

first_imgKillybegs Coast Guard were tasked this afternoon by Malin Head CG to a small angling boat which had left Killybegs harbour and made its way to Portnacross.While on its way back to Killybegs Harbour a member of the public reported seeing the boat in difficulty at Drumanoo Head.Killybegs CG were stood down by Malin Head CG when the boat safely made its way back to Portnacross Pier. If you spot someone in trouble at sea, on the cliffs or coast, even if you ‘think’ that someone may be in trouble , dial 112/999 and ask for the Coast Guard. If you are in trouble at sea, call on VHF Channel 16, MF 2182 KHz or use DSC. ANGLERS MAKE IT SAFELY TO SHORE AFTER ALERT was last modified: December 31st, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:coast guardKillybegsrescuelast_img read more