Party incident imperils top immigration official

first_imgBond’s reaction was a surprise, said ICE spokeswoman Kelly Nantel, and Myers is trying to speak with the senator about it. Despite Bush’s decision to circumvent the Senate, it was clear in earlier hearings that Myers had won over many doubters with her performance in stabilizing the agency’s financial problems and improving its management.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre With just a few more weeks to go before the end of the session, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has not scheduled a vote on Myers. Spokesman Jim Manley said this week that Reid has “serious concerns” with the nomination and is consulting with other lawmakers about how to proceed. Myers met resistance in 2005, the first time President Bush tried to appoint her to the Homeland Security Department post, after Democrats and Republicans said she had weak credentials for the high-profile job. To avoid a fight, Bush installed her during a Senate recess and her position expires at year’s end unless the Senate votes to confirm her. Questions about nepotism also came up because Myers is the niece of Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She is married to John Wood, the U.S. attorney in Kansas City and former chief of staff to Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff. Even some of those expected to defend Julie Myers seemed shaky. “The way things are going, we may not ever vote on her nomination,” Sen. Kit Bond, R-Mo., who is a second cousin of Myers’ husband, said Friday. “Our nation’s immigration enforcement agency needs noncontroversial leadership. That would be best served by going in a different direction with this nomination.” WASHINGTON – Just when it appeared Julie Myers had cleared every hurdle in her quest to officially become the nation’s top immigration official, a dreadlocked wig and a prisoner’s outfit could cost her the job. Myers, director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ran into trouble earlier this month after she and two other agency managers gave the “most original” costume award to a white employee who came to the agency’s Halloween party dressed as an escaped prisoner with dreadlocks and darkened skin. The incident drew complaints of racial insensitivity and an apology from Myers. It also cast doubt on whether she’ll get a confirmation vote before the end of the year, when her original appointment expires. It would be a stunning collapse for Myers, 38, a native of Shawnee, Kan., who worked hard over the past two years to convince skeptical lawmakers that someone with little immigration experience was up to the task of running the government’s second-largest investigative force. last_img read more