Company caught thief after installing new CCTV system at Donegal business

first_imgA company installed a specialist CCTV system to catch a suspected thief after their accountant noticed their business was not performing as well as it should be.Castle Interiors, a painting and decorating supply company in Co Donegal had noticed their books were not tallying over a period of time. They installed a new surveillance camera system and observed one employee who was caught red-handed dipping in and out of the till.Alan Moore appeared at Letterkenny Circuit Court in Co Donegal today for sentence after previously being found guilty of ten counts of theft at the shop at the Courtyard Shopping Centre in Letterkenny.A jury of twelve found him guilty on all charges by a majority verdict of ten to two.The court heard how the owner of the shop, Rossa McCosker, had been informed by his accountant that there had been an unexplained shrinkage in stock.The accountant also said the shop was not performing as it should be.Employee Alan Moore, aged 54, had been reprimanded on a number of occasions for leaving the till open.An older surveillance system which had to be played back by staff was then replaced but Moore had not been told of this.When the new ‘live’ surveillance system was put in place, a member of staff in the company’s Ballyshannon office monitored the activity in the shop.Between 22nd November, 2013 and December 2nd, 2013, the employee made a contemporaneous note of everything that happened in the shop while watching the live CCTV stream.She had noted when to ring in some items into the till put money in or took money out.The jury was shown footage of ten specific incidents when More took cash out of the till and put it into his pockets.The court was told that a total of €794 had not been rung into the till and that €780 in cash had been taken from the till.Because the items were not being rung into the till there was no excess of cash in the till to be lodged at the bank.When approached about the incidents Moore became very angry and later claimed that Mr McCosker had wanted to close the shop and did not want to pay out redundancy money.She was strongly denied and the court was reminded that the Government paid 60% of redundancy payouts in any case.Detective Garda Paul Lynch gave evidence of interviewing Moore after he was arrested.He admitted that he had operated a haphazard system for operating the till for a number of years but this had been tolerated by management.In his victim impact statement, owner Mr McCosker said he operated a number of businesses and after this, he had found it difficult to trust employees.“I am less able to trust individuals and am watchful and needy and I feel more vulnerable to fraud,” he said.The court was told that Moore was now a 56-year-old married man with two sons and had no issues with drugs, drink or gambling.Judge John Aylmer adjourned the case to decide on a sentence which he said he will pass on May 8th next.Company caught thief after installing new CCTV system at Donegal business was last modified: May 2nd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Alan MooreCastle INteriorsCourtyard Shopping Centredonegalfraudtheftlast_img read more

GMOs are saving Hawaiian farms and forests from extinction

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest More evidence is cropping up all the time to support the environmentally friendly nature of biotech seeds and crops. As we’ve learned in Hawaii, GM papayas are a great example of how biotechnology keeps forests intact and decreases the amount of pesticides needed to grow marketable fruits. I call this “GMOrganic” because it’s earth-friendly, farmer-friendly and good for the consumer.Our three-generation farm has been growing papayas since the 1960s and continues to grow these delicious, highly sought after Hawaiian staple. The papaya is a fruit that many locals buy religiously, every week for years. But for a long time, this local favorite was under constant threat.The papaya ringspot virus was prevalent for decades and managed for a long time by cutting down the infected trees or moving fields. Leaf hopper bugs spread the virus, and no pesticide could stop or control the disease. Once a leaf was bit, the whole tree was infected and would eventually die or become a vector itself. The virus would come and go on the islands, and was managed well for the most part. But with no permanent solution, the virus became more prevalent as time went by. Simply cutting down infected trees or plowing new fields no longer stopped the problem. Some farmers even relocated to other islands to find refuge but they couldn’t fully escape the problem. No matter what farmers tried, the papaya ringspot disease ravaged fields across our state.Then, thanks to biotechnology, a new breed of tree came in to save papaya farms from extinction. The GMO solution saved crops by creating a plant that essentially was vaccinated with a weaker form of the virus. A farmer could now grow crops without having to cut down forests to escape the virus. We could once again plant in existing fields without fearing crop failure. GM papayas saved our businesses and helped preserve our vibrant ecosystem. These stronger trees produce a more consistent supply of papayas, often yielding fruit for up to five years. The trees are also less susceptible to other common fungal diseases and consistently provide sweet, juicy fruit in all seasons.This nutritious breakfast staple is once again on Hawaiian plates, and our customers are happy to have safe affordable fruits available year-round. Lines of eager customers waiting at stores for our papayas are once again a regular occurrence, thanks to biotechnology. Our farm is alive and buzzing, and our fields are green with papaya trees brimming with fruit, ensuring a harvest for years to come.last_img read more

Getting things “just right” for that summer livestock show with judge Gary Childs

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This time of year, Ohio State Fair exhibitors are beginning to really focus on a myriad of tasks all to prepare for one thing this summer — providing what the judge of their livestock show will be looking for in the show ring. Every exhibitor knows how much time and effort goes into getting things just right at just the right time, but what exactly is the “just right” in terms of both animal and exhibitor for earning that champion banner?Gary Childs, one of the barrow judges for the 2016 Ohio State Fair Junior Market Show, had plenty to say on the subject.“Success in the show ring requires lots of attention to many small details,” Childs said. “There are no shortcuts leading to show ring glory.”With that in mind, Childs compiled a few points to help exhibitors maximize their chances for success. Here they are. Work at homeThe harder I work, the luckier I get. Everybody wants to win the day the pigs are picked out or purchased. Everybody wants to win at the show, but not everybody is willing to put the time in it takes to develop a champion in between purchase date and show date. I tell the kids I work with that “the days you decide not to clean the pens or work on breaking your pigs to drive are the days you get beat because your competition is working!” Make the pig the limiting factorThey need to be shown at 12 o’clock! It is almost impossible to win a show at any level if the pig isn’t being driven as close as to show ready as possible. Regardless of the kind of pig a judge may or may not prefer, almost all judges select pigs that are show ready. Proper nutrition is one of the key factors for getting pigs to look their best on show day. Showing the right age pig is another huge advantage. Remember, every pig is unique and developing a specific plan for each individual is very important. ShowmanshipDon’t beat yourself. The higher the level of competition, the more important showmanship becomes if the plan is to maximize the opportunity for success. Most judges dislike having to pull that great one out of the corner that is squealing and about to stress out. Pigs have to be broken similar to a steer to get that extra look. The pig needs to have the endurance level to be able to drive at least 45 minutes without gasping for air. SportsmanshipI like to see humble winners. It is my sincere wish that every child that ever exhibits a pig is able to experience what it is like to win at least once. Learning how to win is as important as properly coping with a loss. Experiencing both winning and losing are valuable life lessons for young people. Humble winners don’t do “victory laps” in front of other competitors. Gracious losers don’t whine and pout — they address what needs to be done differently in the future. Always respect the judge’s decision. It is your right to disagree, but listen carefully to the reasons and the answer should be clear as to the placing. Family timeFamily time is the most important time. Showing pigs in 2016 has evolved into a family project. The time the exhibitor spends with their family or mentor is reason enough to show pigs, if there was no other benefit. Dad helps in his way and Mom does her thing and the child benefits almost as much as the parents. I firmly believe that the family that shows together grows together.last_img read more

Preparing cows for a successful breeding season

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A successful breeding season actually begins with management decisions made prior to calving. As we move into the winter feeding period, cattlemen need to review their management plan to ensure optimal rebreeding and success. Rebreeding efficiency can be optimized by focusing on body condition score (BCS), early assistance during calving difficulty, scheduling a breeding soundness exam for the herd sires, planning their herd reproductive health program, and developing a plan to regulate estrus in their first-calf heifers and late-calving cows.Reproductive management begins with evaluation and management of BCS. Body condition score is a numerical estimation of the amount of fat on the cow’s body. Body condition score ranges from 1-9; 1 is emaciated while 9 is extremely obese. A change in a single BCS (i.e. 4-5) is usually associated with about a 75 pound change in body weight. Evaluation of BCS prior to calving and from calving to breeding is important to ensure reproductive success.Rebreeding performance of cows is greatly influenced by BCS at calving. Cows that are thin (BCS < 5) at calving take longer to resume estrous cycles and therefore are delayed in their ability to rebreed. Research has clearly demonstrated that as precalving BCS decreases, the number of days from one calving to the next (calving interval) increases in beef cows. Females with a precalving BCS of less than 5 tend to have production cycles greater than 1 year. For example, cows with a precalving BCS of 3 would be expected to have a calving interval of approximately 400 days, while a cow with a precalving BCS of 6 would have a calving interval of approximately 360 days. South Dakota research illustrates the influence of precalving BCS on the percentage of cows that initiated estrous cycles after calving. This experiment demonstrated that the percentage of thin cows that were cycling in the first month of the breeding season (June) was considerably lower than for cows that were in more moderate body condition. During the second month of the breeding season, 55% of the cows with a BCS of 4 had still not initiated estrous cycles, while more than 90% of the cows in more moderate condition had begun to cycle. Thin cows need a longer breeding season, which results in more open cows in the fall. They may also result in lighter calves to sell the next year because the calves from these thin cows will be born later in the calving season.Management of BCS after calving also impacts rebreeding efficiency. Maintenance requirements for energy and protein increase 25-30% for most beef cows after calving. Producers need to plan their supplementation to match or exceed this increased nutrient requirement. Rebreeding efficiency is enhanced in cows that calved thin if their energy intake is increased (Rutter and Randle, 1984). Although the best management plan is to calve cows in a BCS of 5+, increasing the energy to cows that are thin at calving can boost reproductive performance.Dystocia (calving problems) can severely delay the onset of estrus after calving. Research shows that for every hour a female is in stage 2 active labor there is a 4 day delay in the resumption of estrous cycles after calving. Early intervention helps; 16% more cows conceived when cows were assisted within 90 minutes of the start of calving. The best method is to reduce the incidence of dystocia via selection but early calving assistance will increase the opportunity of cows to rebreed.One overlooked management tool that can improve reproductive performance is breeding soundness exams in bulls. Think of breeding soundness exams as breeding season insurance. These exams are a low-cost method of insuring that your bull is capable of breeding. Examine bulls for breeding soundness about 30 days before they are turned out.I have worked in reproductive management for over 20 years and it amazes me how many cattlemen still do not vaccinate their cow herd against reproductive diseases. Several diseases are associated with reproductive loss (lepto, BVD, vibrio, trich, etc). The main problem is that most reproductive loss due to disease is subtle and ranchers don’t notice the loss unless they have a massive failure. Most cattlemen are not aware of their losses due to abortion. Work with your local veterinarian to develop an annual vaccination plan to enhance reproductive success.Lastly, ranchers need to develop a plan to enhance the rebreeding potential of their first-calf heifers and late-calving cows. Young cows and late-calving cows have one characteristic in common that will greatly impact their reproductive success; anestrus. After each calving, cows undergo a period of time when they do not come into estrus. This anestrus period can be as short as 17 days but can also last as long as 150 days depending upon a number of factors. Typically, mature cows in good BCS will be anestrus for 45-90 days (avg about 60 days) while first-calf heifers will be in anestrus for 75-120 days. Research has shown that only 64% of mature cows have initiated estrous cycles about 70 day after calving while on 50% of first calf heifers have initiated estrous cycles at nearly 90 day after calving. Let’s consider the impact of anestrus and calving date for a herd that calves from March 1 until May 10. Bull turnout is May 20 and the length of anestrus for mature cows is 60 days and for young cows is 90 days. A mature cow that calves on March 1 will begin to cycle on May 1 and is highly likely to conceive early. However, the mature cow that calves on April 20 won’t cycle until June 20 and her opportunity to conceive early is very limited. A first-calf heifer that calves on April 20 won’t begin to cycle until July 20 and will have limited opportunities to conceive. Cattlemen can reduce the anestrous period by fenceline exposure to a mature bull or by treating the cows with progesterone for 7 days prior to bull exposure. Sources of progesterone include the feed additive melengestrol acetate (MGA) or an EAZI-Breed CIDR insert (Zoetis Animal Health). Both sources induce estrus in anestrous cows and exposure of anestrous cows to progesterone for 7 days before bull exposure will not reduce fertility. Pregnancy rates increase in these females because inducing estrus will increase the number of opportunities these cows have to conceive in the breeding season.Managing for reproductive success actually begins at calving. Cows need to calve with a minimum BCS of 5 and with little assistance. Effective planning for reproductive health and management plan for limiting the impact of anestrus will ensure that cattlemen are happy, happy, happy at the end of the breeding season.last_img read more

Career Opportunity: Director of Strategic Partnerships and Nationwide Services

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentThe Ohio Farm Bureau Federation is seeking a director of strategic partnerships who has a proven track record in creating and managing key relationships that will increase the visibility and brand of the organization. The candidate will strategize, develop and lead efforts in creating partnership activities for the organization. A bachelor’s degree in business, agriculture, agriculture business, communications, agricultural communications, marketing or related field is desired. Must have excellent networking skills, strong project management abilities, outstanding communication skills both verbal and written and solid sales and financial management skills. Experience in a membership association and nonprofit environment and a passion for agriculture are preferred. Competitive salary and benefits package offered.Please respond with a cover letter and resumé by email to [email protected].Deadline to apply: Sept. 20, 2019Primary Duties:1. Implement new and grow existing partnerships.2. Strategize, develop and direct effective partnership activities for the organization.3. Lead efforts, designated by the VP of Strategic Partnerships, related to growing the OFBF and Nationwide relationship including:Working with the senior consultant, business development for Nationwide Sponsor Relations; business development field director for OFBF; organization directors; Nationwide agents and more to develop mutually beneficial business opportunities.Strengthen relationships between Nationwide agents and associates and Farm Bureau programs that enhance sales.Develop membership and Nationwide sales opportunities.Assist in Land as Your Legacy programming.Develop strategies to expand Nationwide’s financial and commercial product and service portfolio within Farm Bureau membership base.Work with organization directors and county leadership to promote Nationwide partnership, products and services.4. Lead efforts, designated by the VP Strategic Partnerships, to grow additional existing partnerships and develop new partnership opportunities, including assisting in the identification of potential partnerships, benefit needs of relevant stakeholders and new market opportunities.5. Champion and manage new projects to create stronger partnerships.6. Manage the relationship, as directed by VP Strategic Partnerships, with members and vendors to build the brand and business.7. Collaborate within and outside the organization as needed to devise strategies and tactics for developing and growing partnerships. Liaise with partners to solve issues and communicate needs.8. Contribute to Ohio Farm Bureau media efforts as needed.9. Manage internal workflow, track revenue and expenses, track project performance, meet budgetary objectives and report to management and as directed.10. Build and maintain key contacts across the food, agriculture, business, education, political landscapes and more.11. Daily monitoring of actions of key partners and sharing content with key staff and leaders.12. Identify and prepare coworkers and members for specific events/activities.13. Plan/carryout special events.14. Collaborate with counterparts in other ag groups, state Farm Bureaus and American Farm Bureau.15. Prepare materials, communications, reports and more related to growing and maintaining strategic partnerships.Additional Duties: •    Other assignments as assigned by the Vice President of Strategic PartnershipsMINIMUM EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE QUALIFICATIONS –    Bachelor’s degree in business, agriculture, agriculture business, communications, agricultural communication, marketing or related fieldMINIMUM SKILL QUALIFICATIONS –    Strong networking skills –    Strong ability to communicate and develop professional relationships with a wide variety of current and potential organizational partners and members –    Excellent client-facing and internal communication skills including verbal and written, attention to detail and multitasking skills –    Strong ability to communicate on agricultural topics including (but not limited to) agricultural business, agricultural production, policy, economics, food issues, science, social issues, environmental issues –    Strong sales, project management, business, budgeting and financial management skills with a track record of successPREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS –    Minimum of five (5) years experience in a related position –    Ability to manage budgets –    Goal orientedAbout Ohio Farm BureauMission – Working together for Ohio farmers to advance agriculture and strengthen our communities.The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation is a grassroots membership organization that supports programs that ensure the growth of Ohio food and farms, such as advocating for good government policy, developing opportunities for young farmers, providing student scholarships and grants, supporting Ohio food efforts, creating food literacy programs for kids, hosting community building events and funding efforts to protect the environment, water quality, farmland preservation and more.  Leave a Commentlast_img read more